New answers tagged

3

Let's approach this from the other side. You claim to have 5 years of experience, but claims aren't proof. Maybe your company sucks. Maybe you lied. I have 2 ways to check your abilities: standardized tests (checkable certifications) our house test That's it. With this, we can weed out the fakes and under-qualified. We might weed out those who are too ...


1

An applicant isn’t applying for all jobs and the practice doesn’t correlate with pay and probably not with workplace fit, so what is common or generally acceptable isn’t really relevant. What needs to be considered are (a) is there a current job, (b) how important is it to leave the current job if there is one, (c) how important is it to get the position ...


7

As others have said, it depends. How badly do I want the job? How onerous is the test? I certainly would not be insulted just by the ask. From my own experience screening job candidates I know that people lie and exaggerate on their resumes with some regularity. I wouldn't hold it against a company to do a brief verification of my skill level before ...


2

It entirely depends on the situation. How much do you want the job? And how much is known about the job (role, responsibilities, and remuneration)? Then you will have to set a personal threshold - "I will accept a 3 hour test for a job at Company X that offers a 10% increase in my current salary". Surely a detailed resume showing 5+ years of employment ...


5

So, assuming the market is hungry for developers and my colleague is appropriately skilled for at least a mid-level position, is it worth their time? Everyone gets to place a value on their own time. And everyone gets to place a value on the possibility of landing a particular job. If they value hours of their time more than they value their chances of ...


0

There are so many potential opinions to this question it's difficult to provide a clear response. There is no right or wrong answer. I depends on the situation and how different people value job longevity. Personally, most jobs where I live are dead-end jobs and there isn't much opportunity within any given company. I don't know who could ever stand ...


3

First, the very short answers: Is it worth ... That is very unspecific. Worth from what point of view? Financial? Getting a job? Getting into some research? now I think to go and get higher education, but I doubt its necessity. The question is: will it make life difficult for me when I immigrate / to apply for a job? It is not necessary. You can ...


2

Put your visa restrictions on your CV, linked-in page or whatever the recruiters are using to find you. If you're not sure, ask the next one where they would have expected to see it. They don't want to waste their own time on a candidate that isn't allowed to take the job.


64

Can I get a "Hell no!" ? Using other solid offers as negotiation capital isn't bad in of itself - and while the individual(s) your interviewing may well understand what you're doing and may well even have done the same themselves in similar situations you aren't just interacting with them as individuals but as representatives of the interviewing company. ...


28

There is likely nothing to gain from your transparency. They may take offense and rescind their offer. If you want more time, just say you need time to consider everything. Even better, say that you are expecting* another offer shortly and would like to make your decision after seeing all the results. *Note, here "expecting" is important. You will come ...


76

NO, you should not mention this to the interviewer Two points: The recruiter does not have anything to do with the knowledge about how you want to make a decision (negotiation in current organization or not), they don't need to know that. Just because an organization offered you the expected salary does not mean you are bound to accept the offer, there are ...


7

Many employers can sponsor work visas, so just ask the headhunters if this is an option. However, you'll need to finish up your studies first. Depending on the country you're in, it may be possible to legally work while you study, but this typically comes with tight limits on how many hours per week you can work and what kind of work you can do, meaning ...


-1

One option you should consider is to take the job at A, but keep up the application at B. Should B makes you a better offer, just resign from the job at A.


7

The default behavior here (and I cannot find good reference) is that: You don't have a job until you signed contract or have a contract to sign If you have a contract that you can sign, then it is a real job. Anything else will wildly depend on: how much savings you have (more savings => you can treat "almost offer" as a job offer) how much you trust ...


5

So now, I was told I was in the last round at B, but it's not known where and when this stage will happen. At the same time I'm scheduled to start at A very soon. What is the best course of action here given that B would be my clear preference but I need money and can't stay without a job any longer (i.e. if B doesn't work out, I would ...


0

Starting out from the answer of Lucas, the portfolio serves two goals: to show the skills you have now, and that you could acquire new ones as needed. So how can you demonstrate what you have? Host a small website in which you demonstrate what you can make the frontend look like to a visitor. Make it look good, and make it work faste. Post the code on ...


0

Stackoverflow put out an excellent blog post last week on the nature of getting your first software.development job. https://stackoverflow.blog/2020/02/18/trying-to-find-your-first-dev-job-heres-what-employers-are-actually-looking-for/ I would add one thing to it; its first question, "Do you have the skills to do the job?" I would recommend you look into ...


0

I asked for retake ones, explaining that I had internet disruption during the test. But it was actually true, because we had power outrage in our part of city. You can use the same reason.


3

If you have the direct connection to the company, deal direct. If the recruiter had a contract with the company, that's not your problem. Unless you had any sort of agreement with the recruiter first, you have no restrictions. Some recruiters may have agreements with the client that all recruitment has to come through them - in which case, the company will ...


2

Do it! Enlightened organisations, their HR and hiring managers included, will rightfully see you coming back to try again as a very positive signal. It's impressive when a person has the tenacity and the willingness to put their ego aside to not be perturbed by initial failure, learn what's required to succeed and confidently try again. Indeed, those ...


0

I would deal direct with the company, but as the recruiter drew your attention to it they should probably get their normal commision from the company. Without knowing the recruiter I would prefer myself to talk about details of the hiring process / conditions of job offer etc. direct rather than go through a 3rd party recruiter. Some recruiters will do an ...


1

On the other hand, what if the company has actually enlisted this firm? I don't see evidence of it as there aren't any postings available for this specific position through the recruiter (there are many others though...) Make the best choice you can with the information you have, if you get more information, adjust your actions. So no "what if". I'...


1

No, it doesn't make sense. Incompetence follows you eventually and chances for advancement are slim if you keep moving. Realistically if you expect to be making enough errors that you need to leave in 2 years as your reputation is in tatters. You're better off fixing the underlying issues leading to the errors. Having said that, I have seen whole careers ...


1

A large part of experience in a career is learning from your mistakes. Everybody makes mistakes. Wise people learn from them and know to avoid them in the future. So, in my opinion, starting over from scratch after you've made some mistakes is a good way to pretend you're inexperienced. Experienced people are more valuable than inexperienced people. So ...


6

As you get further into your career, it will become apparent to any potential employer that you keep switching jobs every two years. At that point, nobody will want to employ you for anything but a temporary or unskilled job. There will be no point, as they know you are only going to leave again after a couple of years. Recruiting new people is expensive, ...


0

Don't ask for a retake. It's one thing to fail a test. This happens to everybody. But failing to accept that you failed would make you look childish. Failing at exams happens even to the best. You could be perfectly prepared and fail because of a headache or stress with your girlfriend/ boyfriend. These things happen. Just accept it, don't look for ...


0

You didn't get the job. Move on (mentally and emotionally). The vast majority of recruiters would be all over you if there was a possibility of you having done so (and their getting commission). I give it a few days and, Mr Recruiter doesn't accept my LinkedIn message or reply to it. Send an email requesting an update, but don't get your hopes up. ...


1

I'll give a reason not to ask for a retake in your situation. You say you feel you were caught out. I haven't read the job advert but as I see it there are two possibilities. Either you misunderstood it, or the advert was misleading about what the job entails. In the former case, that happens, it's not the job for you, move on. In the latter case, do you ...


0

It does not seem a situation that an organization would like their applicant to be in. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that this is because of a human error, the person from the recruiting team mistakenly used a no-reply mailer instead of their personal inbox to compose and send out the email. In the current situation, you can do the following ...


0

Remote paid entry position is hard to justify. However, pure equity based remote positions are abundant. Lots of non technical people have an idea but no money to implement it. There are ton of those online. Work for them, your title could be something like CTO. You won’t get paid most likely work for free at your own cost but easy to find such job. Under ...


-1

Is there any possibility to find internships where I can work from home? Remote internships are extremely rare to find, because typically interns are similar to entry-level employees that benefit from face to face interaction and adhoc training. If you really cannot locate and your town is just a college town, consider working for the university you attend.


1

As a hiring manager, I wouldn't consider you for a hire even if you passed on second try with 100%. When a skill is requested, the assumption is that you have the skill ready, to an advanced level (not necessarily perfect), not that you are 'able to refresh or learn it'. Consider they would have asked for 'english speaker', and you fail and say 'well if I ...


2

As a c# developer I can tell you that MVC is becoming less popular and javascript/html front end that connect to Web API backend more popular, so if you learn C# I would only bother learning how to build the backend, which is a much smaller set of c# skills


3

I can't really tell you what to do, but something that's certainly relevant: When companies say they want Java/Swift/C++/Fortran/Rust/MyNewFavLang etc. experience (and the role isn't an entry level grad or similar), they're generally looking for solid, commercial experience with these languages over a few years. Being spread thin often doesn't matter too ...


7

Just ask. If you want to work there, ask. The answer will go one of two ways: They'll say yes, you'll retake the test, and get another shot. They'll say no, and you'll probably never talk to them again. It's not a strange thing to really want to work somewhere, or to believe in yourself, so it's not likely anyone would hold that against you in a way ...


6

Yes, if… For the sake of balancing other answers, I would highlight in which circumstances it would be OK to ask for a re-take (and detail a bit more Dukeling's comment). Indeed, I think it's alright to have your SQL skills a bit "rusted" and been caught off-guard if you didn't prepare for it. I feel comfortable listing skills on my CV that I don't, right ...


3

although i had sql on my resume, I didnt touch it since I graduated from college Perhaps you should update that in your resume that you took college courses in SQL. Don't list it as a "skill." Would it be reasonable to email the hr and ask for a retake after I had some time to prepare? It doesn't hurt to do a follow up email and explain SQL is not your ...


11

No, that would defeat the point of the test. The point of these tests isn't to evaluate your level of skill in a programming language. The point of these tests is to cheaply provide the HR department with a metric with which they can use to justify tossing your resume in the bin. They've got hundreds of applications for each job, and they need something ...


-1

Same thing happened to me. Well, actually I refused to complete the test as I saw that not only were the questions ambiguous like that but they also involved too much actual work. What I did was in the end equally work intensive. I produced a question by question critique of their test and sent it to the CTO with an explanation why I would no longer be ...


66

No. The point of such tests is to determine if you know the subject matter well and therefore would make a good candidate for the job. "Cramming" to pass the test is nearly as bad as not passing the test - they're not looking for "I managed to pass the test" they are looking for a knowledgeable professional. There's limited ways to do that other than ...


125

I suggest you take this as a learning experience and not beg for a re-take. What technologies they have listed on the job posting are things they could potentially ask about in the test. You should have prepared in advance. I highly doubt this opportunity is going to go anywhere even if you do re-take the test as first impressions are usually key.


17

Would it be reasonable to email the hr and ask for a retake after I had some time to prepare? It's not unreasonable. It's also perfectly possible that the HR decides not to let you retake the test. As such, I suggest you also consider looking for other job options while you wait for their answer. Learn from this, and next time try to prepare if you see ...


7

I'll add a different perspective. Maybe they sent you the results exactly because they wanted to elicit some sort of feedback from you. Fully acknowledging that a written technical test is very much different from a face-to-face interview... When I conduct technical interviews, on a couple of "how would you do X" type questions, when I receive correct ...


7

I had a similar situation. The test was online. However, there were some mistakes. I took the test. Filled it with the proper answers (even if it meant failing). After that, I sent them a detailed e-mail, describing the problems I found in the test. They thanked me, and I have no idea what happened next, it is their problem. BTW, clarification: I passed the ...


4

So, I have had experience with a decent looking company. I flunked their test due to poor explanation and very open-ended expectations. They had two parts, which was a coding section and the other was a find all the problems in this file. This was all in C, so it was painful as there are A LOT more mistakes that can be made and to be frank, I didn't know ...


86

This is one of those cases where you need to view the entire interview as a 2-way street. You're interviewing them just as much as they're interviewing you. If you'd really like to work here, then it may be worth your while to draft a response to the recruiter and interviewer indicating why you gave the answers you did and (gently) indicate why you ...


247

You can push back via the recruiter, sure. The recruiter may or may not pass on your feedback, and it may or may not result in a different outcome. Your feedback should be pretty polite though - so lose that "junior developer graded it" stuff, and explain in detail your answer to the SQL queries you mention. You might want to ignore the nit-picky stuff ...


6

TL;DR - Yes, you should follow up. 2 weeks is a long time. If the clinic said the report will be delivered by 2 working days, you should have made a check with the company about the receipt of the same by now (after 3-4 days). Right now you are assuming things: So it seems that the company already have the result.. But i still not have any offering , or ...


10

This entire predicament seems based on the assumptions that The internal recruiter will be unable to move quickly to make an offer The external recruiter will be unable to wait long once they've made an offer Those assumptions are probably both false, but better than that, it actually only takes one to be false to resolve the other anyway. Slow down. ...


32

Should I let the internal recruiter know that I am likely doing the final interview at another company soon or should I wait until something more solid shows up? No. There is nothing to be gained, and it will not change the outcome. The internal recruiter, who had the project canceled on him, is probably way more frustrated then you are about canceling ...


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