New answers tagged

1

Do they work in companies? Sometimes. They may work for a government as a Diplomat, Intelligence Specialist, or Political Analyst. They may work for an international non-profit. They may work for a corporation as a Lobbyist. Or they may work anywhere in an unrelated field.


3

This question will be closed soon. But before it is, let me answer that normally people's education only to some extent defines their professions. There are exceptions such as strongly regulated professions like M.D.s and lawyers. But apart from them, it's more complex. I'm currently looking to employ someone as an IT Project Manager (PM) and plenty of ...


10

She's emailed the company's HR representative asking for help. Is there anything else she should do in this situation? You did almost everything that needs to be done, just to make sure the information is not missed / lost, call them up (the HR, Recruiter or the contact person - as applicable) and inform about the issue.


13

I think your view might be warped because of the places you worked (gaming industry). That industry is based on exploiting impressionable young software developers who want to create games and are willing to work long, long hours for peanuts in the gaming industry. Once people grow up, so at the age of 30, they don't fall for that kind of BS anymore, and in ...


2

I think many software professionals make the mistake of looking at the job market, things like TIOBE and the Stackoverflow survey to assess their "market value". They assume that to be valuable in the job market they need to possess the most popular skills of that market. The problem is that's only true in a "macro" sense, and is geared ...


15

Late 20's? I didn't start in IT until my mid 30's. I started in COBOL and moved off the big-iron 6 years later. I was laid-off in late 2018 and found a new position in two weeks. I was 61 at the time. I'm Microsoft full-stack but this would apply with other skill-sets. From your listed skills you can code. C++ and assembler are positives. What's not ...


8

There is no problem with your age. You should focus on your experience and ensure that your skills are up to date. If you do not have the certifications but done some training. Showcase your newly learned skills by creating a GitHub project. We recently employed someone in her/his late 50's. So for certain recruiters age not an issue rather an advantage.


1

Another common approach is not to disclose your current employer until later in the process. You could put on your CV something like "One of the top 10 universities", or whatever generally describes it, instead of the actual institution you work at. You also should, as mentioned in another answer, explain in the cover letter that you will disclose ...


3

You can explicitly say in your cover letter (or application form, or say to the new employer directly, or whatever) "please do not contact my current employer for references yet, as they do not know I am looking to leave - I will of course provide a contact if we reach the stage of a formal job offer". This is fairly normal and any reasonable new ...


1

A very common (and understandable) complaint from people just entering the job market is: "every job opening wants someone with experience. But I can't get experience without a job!" The reasoning behind the recommendation to work on open-source projects is that it is a way to gain experience without first having to get a job. The key point is that ...


3

In more than "thirty-plus" years in this crazy business, I have never actually created an open-source project. And, as a sometimes hiring manager, I can honestly say that I don't have time to code-review your project. I'm not going to look at your source-code, nor ask one of my subordinates to do so. In my opinion, the most-important factor – ...


1

I would say if you make additions to a well known project, then you can consider yourself a contributor to open-source. Doesn't matter which project you do, just as long as it is well known and you made a useful contribution. I don't think these changes need to be popular or in widespread usage. Just need to be useful for you and possibly to others. Also of ...


6

While working on personal projects and community projects are beneficial, I think they are beneficial in different ways. I think it actually matters greatly. But let me be clear, doing something to advance your skills is always better than doing nothing. Personal projects are one way. A large part of development is dealing with people. That is something that ...


0

Just for general advice, it is a bad idea to give away the last four digits of your social security number. Just like it is bad advice to play Russian Roulette. It may be fine sometimes, but other times the outcomes are very bad. Unfortunately you have no way of knowing. When I'm cold-called by an recruitment agency about a job, and I agree to be submitted, ...


7

If I create my own projects and hosted them on GitHub, and others have stared and forked them, does that mean I have worked on open-source? Or is it how I initially thought, you can only say you have worked on open-source if you've contributed to other people's projects? I think this is your problem - you are focused on trying to phrase in "worked on ...


0

When I read "gain experience through open-source" I also understand this to mean, contribute to an communal open source project, not working on your own projects and making those open-source. However I think the latter is also an useful experience. And when other persons are forking your repositories you should definitely put that on your CV.


-1

And they replied that it does not matter. It doesn't matter. But it has little value unless it's a high profile project. The reason they say contribute to open source is because it's a tiny bit better than nothing at all. It's just another factor to add to an otherwise bare resume. At beginner level it's not really necessary because most people do not view ...


1

I posted the original question three years ago. Since then, for better or worse, I have been giving recruiters my birthday/date (not year) and last four digits of my SSN. A few months back, I got an e-mail from a recruiter I had been corresponding with; it accidentally included some information that was supposed to go the hiring company. In a cell on a form, ...


0

The fact that you 'survived' 3 ownership changes in your organisation shows that you are an asset that is worth keeping and that you are good in what you do. So it is up to you to decide what you want to do next. Be that a new challenge within the same sector or a complete career change. I would say you are not being 'taken advantage' of, but paid to do a ...


0

Firstly well done for persevering in job-hunting. You recognised it as having a negative effect on your mental health and you got it sorted. I would look for both temporary/contract and a full-time position. Any working experience is valuable when you start out. Even if it is temporary work, and not exactly in your field. You know that you have a long term ...


1

I was one of the first people to get laid off. So I quickly found myself another job. Subsequently, more people got laid off, and they had much more trouble finding work because the available jobs had been filled by people in the first wave of layoffs. Consider yourself fortunate. Get off your ass and start looking for work now, while the looking is good.


0

One thing you can ask is how the company will manage without your particular skillset. Pethaps your skillset is expendable because they can do without by taxing others who possess a similar skills and are otherwise not easy to replace. There might be many reasons for letting you go that are not performance based but rather otherwise strategic.


3

There's definitely no reason for you to remain idle, "hoping" that they will call you back. Dust off the ol' resume and get shopping for a new job. Pronto.


0

Ask them. If they have a requirement, or their customer has a requirement they will know it. In the US there are no standards, there is plenty of advice but there are no absolute standards. When we have put in a bid for federal contracts, I have seen a wide variety of requirements. I have seen word counts, font requirements, page requirements, margin ...


1

It is important to note that in most cases these days "thanks for your application" messages are automated emails generated by the company's online hiring portal. That email is just to confirm that the hiring portal worked as intended and that the company is now able to review your application when they get to it. Not only do you not need to ...


8

At least in the UK we have government help for furlough, which applies up to a limit. Therefore it makes sense to furlough some employees rather than reducing the salaries of all - it's better to spend someone else's money than your own. All other things being equal, the employees to furlough are the ones with the highest salary below the cut-off, as that's ...


25

It is entirely feasible you were let go because your projects were finishing up-- you can be left behind with no disruptions to other projects. That makes you expendable, almost regardless of performance. Still, it is a good idea to talk to your manager. The worst that can happen, and the most likely, is that the manager will give you little to no ...


1

Never let the possibility of something get in the way of the here and now. I've made that mistake plenty of times and it never results in anything good.


30

I agree with Old_Lamplighter that, justified or not, you have been categorized as the expendable bottom 10 percent and you should start looking for another job immediately. However I think you have nothing to lose by asking your manager for some honest feedback. Sure, he/she might just give you "managerial nonsense" and a "HR friendly ...


130

Update your resume and look for another job. No matter the reason, you've been put in the bottom 10% of employees, and deemed to be expendable. If it's not by department, not by project, or anything else you can point to, then the reason is you. WHY the reason is you is irrelevant. If you ask for an explanation, you will just get some managerial nonsense ...


3

The project is important to your company and they have asked you to work on it. Therefore, you should try to complete the project to the best of your ability. If you might not complete the project then you need to communicate this with your management team and ask for advice.... .... it sounds like you have already done this and they have instructed you to ...


0

First off, you need to determine what field you'd like to work in and the jobs you'd like to target. Second, prepare for the target field. If it is anything remotely coding and software related (like machine learning or data science), you can build projects and showcase them on a GitHub profile. One thing is that the current pandemic situation means that ...


4

If the "thank you for your application" message was the first e-mail they sent you, it is worth replying to confirm round-trip communication. It can be a very simple quote of their message with "Thank you" added. If you have already established that the secretary is sending to the right e-mail address do not clutter their mailbox with a ...


2

My goal is to work for this company for 4 months, and search for a Jan 2021 position in the mean time. I want to believe that COVID will be at a minimum during the months of Nov and Dec 2020, so positions for Jan 2021 will open. Actually your goal is to work for this company until the job situation improves. And by improves that doesn't just mean it becomes ...


34

Don't send anything. They have explicitly told you that they will contact you. They are not expecting an acknowledgement. They do not need an acknowledgement. If you didn't get their email, they would expect you to follow up, so the assumption is you received it, until you prove otherwise with a follow up email. Some may say that it's always a good idea to ...


4

File it away - either in your trash can or, if you are closely tracking the status of all your job applications, in a relevant folder.


159

Don't send any reply. They told you they received your application and will contact you when they're ready. There's nothing for you to say, and any email you send with a non-message will just clutter their inbox and waste their time. Unless you have something of substance to say or a question you need answered, don't send them anything.


3

You are not mandated to send any response, however, a thank-you response does not harm. You can reply with something like Dear XXX, Thanks for the acknowledgement. I will wait to hear back from you. Meanwhile, if you need any further information, I'd be happy to provide the same. Regards, Rishab.


14

There's nothing wrong with "I'm unemployed, I'll take whatever is offered just to get money" (to be honest I've done the same thing many times personally). What is wrong is stating as much to your employer. That will likely burn your bridge there permanently and make everyone there hate you. Plus, it's not productive to go in with the mindset of ...


1

This <a href="mailto:someone@example.com"> thingy is already a part of the software. If it is wrong, this is simply a bug. Or maybe the writer has not been skilled enough with some authoring tool. Forgot to update the link after updating the visible part. Or the authoring tool itself is buggy. You should always use the link visible for humans....


1

I did a quick look at some of the jobs posted using the above methods on Stack Overflow and Indeed (quick and non-scientific). My conclusions: This works well on Indeed. The 'R' tag on Stack Overflow brought up mostly jobs with Python in the title, and I found no mention of R within the bodies of the job postings. I do appreciate the methods outlined, and ...


5

Seems like it might just be a little mixup. If I encountered this, I'd just send the message to both addresses using a CC option and point out in the message that I wasn't sure which address it was supposed to be and that it might be some kind of mixup in their page. At best, they'll appreciate both your attention to detail and willingness to help them ...


-2

I would address it to the "Fred Nurk" name/email since that's what was explicitly stated in the job ad. I think the underlying "mailto:" hyperlink is probably just a tech malfunction. "JBloggs" (Joe Bloggs) is a standard placeholder name [e.g. I have used "J Bloggs" as an example at least 4 times this week when talking ...


1

So who do I address my email to? "Fred Nurk" or "Joe Blogs"? It doesn't make a difference how you start the letter. When you send a cover letter it will be read by multiple people. The screener will read it; the one doing the phone interview will read it; the 3-5 people conducting the face-to-face interviews will read it. Then the hiring ...


3

You have a few options. You don't NEED to use the mailto: link. You have the email address listed. You can simply send your letter to that address and address it to the appropriate person. It's possible the JBlogs address has been deleted and the person has left the company and this is a copy/paste error. Or you can assume this is something scammy and just ...


4

This is a job, though a fairly rarefied one. Major enterprises (e.g. Dell, Home Depot) have dedicated performance engineering organizations that usually use expensive application performance management (APM) tools to monitor and optimize their applications. Big tech companies have the same that do tool creation and such - like Yahoo's Exceptional ...


8

Find a niche where optimization is important and work toward career in that niche. The examples that came to my mind immediately are: Embedded development: faster and smaller code allows cheaper hardware and longer battery life. Size is often more valuable than speed, since RAM consumes power even when idle. Game development: faster algorithms allow ...


3

Tell the truth. But show that you have learned from the experience. I was deceived into accepting ... The hiring decision is a two way street. If the company managed to "deceive" you, then you didn't do your home work properly. Portraying this entirely as the company's fault will backfire. Explain where YOU went wrong and talk about what YOU ...


0

There are many red flags here, and I would jump ship immediately: You were promised to be fast tracked to the final stage of the interview process, but then that promise was reneged on and you had to complete an additional interview stage. Make no mistake, this is reneging on a promise; it's not as simple as "circumstances have changed", this is ...


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