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0

Job applications to online job sites, or web sites of individual companies, have an extremely low acceptance rate. Some applications are filtered away before any person even sees them. Often these types of job applications are posted for legal or compliance reasons, and there is no intention of ever filling the job from these applications. So if most or ...


3

Talk with a recruiter. Either to get help on finding a placement, or to help with your CV. I'm a bit biased against college academic advisors - in my experience, they drift away from a business-world mentality and into an academic one (understandable, since they spend each day surrounded by academia.) A recruiter doesn't have that issue. They're used to ...


0

I do agree with others that the best source would be friends or family members who are in the industry. I do not agree that a mentor at the university is a good idea. Here's the issue I found: most of my professors never worked a job outside of the academia or research. The career counselors at my university were students themselves who never held a job ...


2

Have you discussed your cv with friends and family? Usually, you will know some people with work experience. They will tell you if your cv is terrible. From your description it was not clear to me whether you are available immediately, or only several months in the future? I know that many companies are not interested in finding an employee for next year, ...


6

You're a student, so ask your mentor, or whoever is undertaking that role. You have a support network there, you should use it in order to assess the suitability and attractiveness of your resume and online profiles and help you to become more successful.


5

Its a perfect spot for a elevator pitch about yourself. Think of it as a compact version of your cover letter (which probably will only be glanced over anyway).


0

Yes, these are really bad. However, the golden rule is Never say any bad from your previous employer. Yes, working further by the company is expected, but not this is the custom. Check others' work history on the Xing/Linkedin. You will see that most of them did not work where he was trained. If they ask, why you did not work there after your degree, ...


-2

Note, if you have to fill forms on your application, it is likely a "zeroth step" in the employment process. Its most probable function to silently dismiss the applications where it is some crap. The HR will probably ignore it, except that it will be a serious disadvantage, if you had written something which is a red flag for them. In theory, you can write ...


2

Should I be applying as an intern? If you want a full time job then apply for a full time job and tell them your expected availability. I don't feel like I am very strong in my data structures and algo should I be worried? I don't expect that a company that would hire someone straight out of school would expect them to be an expert or to have any real ...


0

If the field is optional, and you can't think of anything to write there, leave it empty.


5

Was it a scam or a genuine call? I honestly think the latter because I think I asked the correct questions and I did indicate my willingness to work. You cannot decide this based on your questions but based on their answer/s. As per the information provided, I suspect this may be a scam or genuine company but not ready to spend enough. You can verify ...


1

Short interview alone is neither red nor green flag. There are 2 strategies that work: Hard to get in, hard to get out. This is probably what you're used to. A difficult interview that's supposed to weed out bad candidates, and after that everybody lives happily everafter with coworkers held to equally high standards. Easy to get in, easy to get out. This ...


0

A lot of good answers already, so I'll focus on the personal experience bit, which adds just a little. I'm currently working in a job which I got through a similar process. Though there were a few face to face interviews, never did I do a technical challenge of any kind. There were 3 meetings in total. Meeting with the team lead, but the topic was a ...


1

Since you have security clearance you must have worked in the defense sector before. I have experience in the public transportation sector which is fairly regulated. I can only suppose that the situation in defense is similar to other industries whose products are not software per se but machines (or weapons) which use software. Especially in regulated ...


1

My current company made an offer after a one hour interview. Which was all about solving real world problems with the big view of things, no programming at all. Another company interviewing for an hour led to me calling my agency “sorry, not these guys”. The company before took two hours. Manager of the team I would be joining, followed by team lead of ...


2

I cannot say for sure with the information you have provided, but there can be other factors that have some importance. But it boils down to: They have your CV, They have asked clarifications and could evaluate your personality (what an interview is for), They have specific needs (otherwise they would not be hiring), They may have other information (I would ...


27

I am going to be the dissenting voice here. I had this experience. I interviewed with a government contractor doing software. Just met with one or two people and got an offer. High paying offer. It was one of the worse places I have worked. We had people that were so bad they wouldn't even bill them to the contract and it still took them forever to ...


4

Interviews don't have to be the long, grueling affairs that some employers make them. Interviewing is often about "fit", as in "Do you fit in their culture?". For some places, the interviewers believe they can figure this out quickly. Furthermore, people often assume your resume tells the story of what you've done and/or they ask just enough to figure out if ...


5

For many companies, the style you described is absolute standard. If these are companies that you wouldn't want to work for because of this, that is of course your decision. But you shouldn't consider it a exceptional behavior or red flag. I always wondered how common 'show-coding' interviews really are - I have been in panel interviews for at least forty ...


14

Should I be concern on how they did their interviewing process or am I just overthinking it? You are overthinking it. I once had an interview which was over before I had finished my coffee (took the job) and I once gotten an offer while walking back from the interview to my car (did not take the job). My previous job I landed after a more "normal" process (...


3

Interview was just an one hour panel. Got offer the next day; do I take or is this a red flag? Neither. Maybe they are bad at interviewing, and maybe that's it and it's a great company. Or maybe it stems from incompetence at everything. Or maybe they've decided that technical interviews and/or skills aren't worth very much compared to willingness to ...


31

The places where I have worked with a smart, competent, motivated and functional team have typically employed LESS whiteboarding/tests/various interview shenanigans. My own theory on this is that knowledgeable technical people are able to identify others with appropriate proficiency just by asking them pertinent questions. There seems to be a direct ...


163

Interviews serve two purposes, both very important. One is for the employer to assess whether you are a good person for the job. The other is for you to assess whether you want to work for the employer. A one-hour many-on-one interview isn't a great way for you to make your assessment, as you know. You can say to the hiring manager something like "Thanks ...


7

I have done an apprenticeship as a software developer in Germany myself many years ago, and I have been the Ausbilder in two companies. Many of my friends have also done various tech apprenticeships (both Fachinformatiker and IT-System*). There is absolutely no reason for you to feel guilty about leaving after your apprenticeship ends. There is no need for ...


289

You realise most people here would kill for a one hour interview that resulted in a job offer the next day, right?! That's great! I'd figured there be some follow-up interviews where we can go more in depth of my coding abilities and system architects logic. IMHO, I'm glad more companies are actually moving away from this style of all-day really in-depth ...


46

Having been vetted for security clearance and passing a one hour conference can in some cases be pretty normal - especially if they're in need of a particular skill. I got hired to one of my nicest jobs in a similar fashion (basically a team of 20 people eating pizza and interviewing me). I don't really understand from your post what you are worried that ...


8

There are ways to be truthful while not being rude or insulting.. You don't seem to like the culture, or it isn't a good "cultural fit". What does that mean? I don't know, I just know that if I didn't like the work culture, or my personality didn't work well with the culture, I'd leave my job as well. People do it all the time, I love where I work now, I ...


4

"My instinct is to be honest and (politely) talk shit about my old job, it might come off as me being difficult to work with so it might not be the greatest idea, so I’m considering to either only tell part of the truth (health implications for example) or lying." None of these sound like a good idea. "I don’t learn anything so I can’t grow" This is a ...


2

In the UK, I would suggest checking whether a potential employer is signed up to the Disability Confident scheme. Disability Confident is a government scheme designed to encourage employers to recruit and retain disabled people and those with health conditions. In particular, many Disability Confident employers offer a Guaranteed interview scheme. We ...


4

I didn't see any location indication. My answer is based on my experience in Europe, more specifically, France. I am a software engineer. I have a disability caused by a neuro-muscular disease. I am recognized by the state as disabled and as such, I am entitled to adaptations in the workplace (like specific screens, keyboards, seats, etc). Because of this, ...


1

I'm writing based on experience in the US. As others have said, don't do this in the cover letter. By doing so you're telling the wrong people. (I'll explain what to do instead after I explain this statement.) The purpose of the cover letter, along with the resume, is to sell yourself well enough to get the interview. Don't misrepresent yourself, of ...


0

If you are having suicidal thoughts - seek help Rewrite the CV. and give it a timeline that can be easily followed. i.e. from the age of 12 to date Put at the top you name address and contact details. After this have a personal profile. This should include a bit about your character and what you are looking for in a job. Have a list of key skills - at most ...


5

This might not be the answer you're looking for, but I think you should look into fixing your resume. A resume should be targeted at documenting the skills that will allow you to succeed at your ideal job. Your resume is too much about your character and not enough about your IT skills, which is what companies will care about, especially big brand name ...


0

I agree with pretty much everything in John Spiegel's answer. I'd prefer, however, to showcase that you handled multiple, simultaneous roles in the resume. Simultaneous Positions - Company A (2015 - Present) Project Manager at Company A PM item 1 PM item 2 Sales Manager at Company B (Wholly owned subsidiary of A) SM item 1 ...


1

You should showcase your experience but brevity and clarity are key. I tend toward "non-material truth altering" in this case. What I mean is not to lie, but standardize the presentation to the industry. You can explain any detail that might matter in an interview but you don't want to raise confusion for someone scanning your resume. Unless Company B ...


3

Yes, you should showcase the relation between the jobs, to avoid confusion just as you mentioned. Something like Project Manager at A, 2015-current - item1 - item2 Sales Manager at B (Wholly owned subsidiary of A), 2015-current - item1 - item2 That said, I think you meant to write "2015", not "20015". You MUST NOT make these types of ...


7

How would you describe this situation in the cover letter? I am going to attempt to answer this head on. Your question was how would you describe this on a cover letter, my answer is as delicately as possible. If you are going to mention it up front, before they meet you face to face, I would recommend mentioning your disability in a way that shows your ...


3

I can only comment from someone who has applied to positions in the United States. When you apply to a job, you have (in general) three parts: Resume Cover Letter References And the application itself. The resume gives you the opportunity to present your work experience and skills for the job. The cover letter allows you the opportunity to address any ...


1

When writing a letter of reference, I include a statement of how I know the person. I'm delighted that Xxxx Yyyy asked me for a reference. For the last two years, Xxxx and I worked together as volunteers at Zzzzz. Our work required us to interact with users of Zzzz's product Qqqqqq. etc etc Xxxx was a good partner for me. He was reliable.... etc ...


1

I was a volunteer coach for a college sports club. I had several of my players, as well as someone who was as assistant coach when she was a graduate student, ask me to write recommendations for them for grad school, and for jobs. None of those positions were sports club related. So, first of all, it's a personal reference, but what I did was I thought ...


2

You asked a few questions, My question is, how would employers view a character reference received from someone whose relationship with the candidate extends only as far as online interaction through gaming? Ultimately, that's on your friend, not you, to decide. There may even be specific reasons why he's picking you (maybe he's applying for a job ...


5

Years ago I played an online game (Goalline Blitz if you've heard of it) and got to know a guy pretty well through managing our team. He and I have now been friends for about 10 years. In every way I consider him a friend and not just an online acquaintance. The reason I bring that up was that when he applied for a job, I served as a reference. ...


11

My question is, how would employers view a character reference received from someone whose relationship with the candidate extends only as far as online interaction through gaming? Not your problem. You've just been asked to write a reference. It's up to the recipient to decide it's usefulness. Should I be frank about the nature of our relationship ...


0

Keep it in context of the clan, but make the language more "squad leader/team" military in tone. The context will make this more readable and engaging for the reader, but don't forget to highlight his leadership and mentoring skills as well as displaying a respectful attitude toward other teams (with examples, if possible). This could turn out to be really ...


2

I would probably leave it off the cover letter. Disclosing information early makes it easy to discard the candidate very early, even though most cover letters are ripped off without being looked at. It's super easy to avoid all of the complications that come with managing people with disability to discard the resume before the interview process starts.


19

I'm not sure I would. The resume is all about piquing interest in you and convincing them they have to meet you. It's sad to say, but honestly, a lot of companies would simply bypass your resume if they saw you have a condition that might cause them any sort of inconvenience. It's after they get to meet you and realize you're competent and know your ...


0

What is the best way to respond? Thank them for their time and let them know they are free to contact you when they continue the hiring process. That being said, if you're looking for new work I would not recommend sitting and waiting for 6 months for any specific company. This company may contact you, they may not. Even if they do contact you, there is ...


2

Did you receive a formal offer with a start date far in the future? If not, I would work under the assumption that the employment opportunity is no longer available. “On hold” could mean many things, but it at least tells you that the company has ceased searching for candidates for the role. They may have found another way to organize a team so that the ...


9

I really want the job even if that means waiting 6 months. So do that. The company informed that they are putting the position on hold, not you or your application. There's nothing much you can do from your side now. You can respond them by thanking them for the opportunity, something like "Thanks for allowing me the opportunity to interview with your ...


6

I'm a senior guy who is a current reviewer of technical resumes for my company; In my opinion, anything like SE participation or Github/Gitlab projects that helps me to get a better idea of what you do and who you are is very welcome.


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