New answers tagged

3

Honestly you sound like absolutely any other developer - no difference. Find, apply for, and get jobs that look appealing to you: that's the whole story. Literally, do those three specific things. In answer to your questions. How should I position myself as resource in a job search to eventually become a "normal" Full Stack developer? Should I ...


5

I voted to close this question as too specific, but I don't like leaving people without help so I'll give you what I can, in as general a way as I can. You have skills in various technologies. Companies want people who know those technologies. So apply to those jobs. You have 4 years of Java Spring experience, that's nothing to laugh about, and a whole ...


4

No, there's no conflict there as far as I can see. You might want to take a look at the non-competition clause of your employment agreement to make sure though. If the consultancy is providing your company with a service, it's not likely to be interpreted as a competitor, so you should be ok. But check your agreement.


0

Of course you keep interviewing. One bad interaction should not sway you in any decision you make in life. That doesn't mean you have to give people hundreds of passes, or even two. But everyone has an off day. In passing up this opportunity, you are also limiting yourself to interview experience. Perhaps your next interview will be similarly awful - or ...


-2

You're lucky you're only at the introductory stage of the interview when you had this interaction. DON'T WALK, RUN. I can't make it clearer than that. So, you went to a convention for women and were referred despite being a man. The point is, regardless of your gender, you were impressive enough that the recruiters at the conference thought you would be a ...


0

It depends on how valuable the opportunity you'd be giving up is. So, you spoke to a couple of people at the company who impressed you favorably, and one who treated you somewhat badly. Most likely, from the sounds of things, you wouldn't be interacting with any of them regularly as part of your job if you did get a position. So... overall, maybe not a ...


1

If I've got this right, the recruiters that you're considering talking to are the original people who impressed you at the company's booth. I'd recommend pushing past the disappointing behavioral interview and expressing continued interest in the original positions that were discussed. If it comes up, you could mention that the behavioral interview presented ...


1

Contribute to open source projects! @daboross' answer is extremely good advice. I just want to clarify the point in that answer, "Make projects". It is not essential that you create your own application or library from scratch. That would show your skill, but not your "soft skills" working within a team setting. I suggest finding an ...


0

So far I've learned HTML, CSS, Javascript, JQuery, React including Hooks & Redux, Node, Express, MongoDB & Mongoose and PostgreSQL. I invested over a year learning all of this, You have started well Colt83. Those are really good choice of languages and great tools in your belt. Keep it up. When we were kids, we had to learn alphabets, our teacher ...


7

I started learning web development by myself, over the internet. [...] I was feeling like I accomplished something so far. Apparently not. I think you are missing a critical key ingredient here. You are looking for a job. If I told you I had read about accounting on the internet for a year and watched some really great youtube tutorials, would you hire me ...


0

The real requirement for most Junior Developer jobs is to be capable of writing the simple brute force solution to Hacker Rank programming challenges. Apply to a bunch of jobs that you're "Not Qualified" for. Some of them will send you at-home programming assessments. Do those assessments and if you can code then you'll get some job offers.


1

Many skills about technology are transferable - you say you can do React, so you can probably learn Vue pretty quickly too. Same thing with Node - if you already know Javascript, you should be able to pick up the other aspects quickly. If you have zero database experience then jobs with MongoDB, PostgreSQL or other data storage components are going to be ...


3

I totally understand you, we all have been there! After applying for the jobs, always get in touch with the job poster or recruiter of that company, ALWAYS. Make up a question, or ask anything but show your eagerness and interest to get that job. Do little extra than what all the other people are doing for that job. Please don't just send a resume and expect ...


15

I haven't found one single job I'm qualified for. Not one. Are you applying and getting rejected, or just looking at the required things and deciding not to apply? Here's what you do: Look at a job board to find developer jobs, only look at the title and salary Find one you like Avoid anything with a senior title, you want either "junior developer&...


59

1. finding a job is a number game Find a job is a number game so cast a wide net. Even if you're fully qualified, there's only a small chance any particular company will hire you for any particular role, purely due to the number of people applying. The solution: Get on as many job sites as you can find, and look for jobs you're remotely qualified for, and ...


0

They’re getting too many applicants. You’re asking why this is done, so I’ll tell you the simplest reason: they’re getting too many applications, so they then proceed to raise the requirements to reduce the number of viable applications they receive; if they’re getting a thousand applications and 90% of them have less than 5 years experience, then they can ...


3

In my experience, if we are talking about LinkedIn job postings, Majority of posters do not change that option and by default it is Entry Level


2

It means that you need to ask about the salary expectations that they have. Many places want to get someone with 25 years of experience, but pay for someone with only 1 year. If you expect to get paid for your experience, you need to ask for that and be prepared to walk when they do not match or even come close to what you need.


2

If it's on every job listing, then like others have pointed out, it's probably a default field that was missed or a bug on the website. However, entry level usually means a person just about meets the skills needed for entry, but not enough to work autonomously (without a lot of assistance from colleagues). I was under the impression that an entry level job ...


0

I would advice to first double-check that you're the person to fill that position. HR may be giving you another opportunity given your interest shown in the company, if you truly make the fit for the new job. But HR and recruiters are in charge of finding the right people to fill a certain position. People being enthusiast about working at a company is a ...


4

I needed to slightly reword my answer because your edit (internal recruiter from HR vs. external recruiter) invalidated parts of it... But I kept the same thrust It is the recruiters' job to find the best candidate for a position. The recruiter already told you, that they'd be happy to hear from you in the future. That's why I am quite sure, that the ...


3

"Honestly ... who the hell knows?" Just apply for the job, and good luck.


13

They've either got exceptionally high standards, or (much more likely) the person writing the job ad has no idea about the position they're recruiting for. Perhaps even more likely again is that there was a field that the person placing the advertisement didn't notice or read properly, and "entry level" was the default. I'd look at the other ...


5

I would apply but I'm not sure I should given it's possible that it's a position of my former employee's boss (again). How should I play that? Having already dealt with this employee, you should be in a better position to not only deal with this specific employee but any problematic employee that you encounter. This of course is assuming that you learned ...


6

Good news - it's a non-issue. This sort of situation is perfectly normal. During the course of your career, it will happen a number of times - in all permutations! Indeed in certain industries it's so common it's a non-event. Don't even consider it as an issue - move on with your choice. In all workplaces (such as your new one) there will be team members who ...


0

What is important in an interview, is your experience. Experience comes in many shapes or forms, even though it may not be immediately obvious to you how it's relevant to a particular job. Going back to school to learn more is generally seen as commendable, as you'll pick up transferable skills such as project and time management, meeting requirements set by ...


0

There's nothing wrong with what you did. Most companies will just accept it. If someone asks you for an explanation, you tell them that 8 months at university would improve what you can do and what benefit you in your career, and would benefit the next employer as well.


19

do i have to mention this to my interviewer? No. You don't have to. You can just say you worked at that company for 2 years. If you want to mention it (or they ask you) then you can say: I worked there for a year, then took an 8 month break to focus on my university work, and then returned for 1 year That doesn't sound bad or go against you at all. If ...


2

The things you learned are more important than where you learned it. So I would definitely put in there that you have been working and what skill you have develop. Linked-in does not force you to add an existing company to your work experience, so I would not add one. So something along these lines seem right to me: company: A bio-tech startup Title: ...


8

Treat it like working on some kind of classified research. Explain your duties, skip over the details or purpose of it, and if anyone asks tell them you're on an NDA and can't discuss the specifics of what you did. It shouldn't be that weird that you're not allowed to talk about some secret project you worked on. Just because you're on an NDA to yourself (...


-3

I think you should just gloss this over as a break. Entrepreneurs are sometimes discriminated against for many good business reasons. I've got a feeling based on how we left it that in a few years at least one of us will come back to this thing and pick up where we left off, and that's if no one keeps working on it now. This is one of the main reasons why. ...


3

Should I disclose that I was terminated? If you are asked why you left your last job (which will almost always be asked), then you should be honest and disclose that you were terminated. You should also have a story to tell about why you were fired, and a way to assure your next employer that it won't happen again. If you are not asked, there's no need to ...


Top 50 recent answers are included