New answers tagged

2

Recruiters are not very likely to be interested in any projects that you have done, though it may be worth it to mention it if they are seeking you out for a specific role in mind. For example, if the role they are trying to fill is a database admin role, you may want to mention a project where you stood up a database and managed it. As a hiring manager, I ...


13

Put them on GitHub and finish them up. Actual experience in delivering projects is worth a ton, even if those projects are just things you coded in your spare time. This applies to very much all levels of software developers, and if nothing else shows that you have passion for it.


1

"I know that this is going to be a big problem for securing a job." "From conversations with friends and acquaintances who have been employed since their undergrad or masters, they unanimously conceded that a year of gap is a red flag in hiring. I don't have any concrete evidence." Do not listen to them. I have had a good 4.5 yrs of career break and now I ...


0

The best way to answer the question about the gap (if asked): Be truthful. There is nothing, which you described, is a deal-breaker. Just stick with the version you mentioned above. A timeline like Completed Masters in early 2013 Worked in the R&D company for 4 months. Application for PhD accepted in Jan 2014, joined the program on Sept 2014. Should ...


2

Your letter is fine. I like it because it is succinct and talks about why you deserve more. Its actionable, if they offer you between X and Y you will take the job. However, I am confused: and now I decided to join them and they made me a better offer but still low for such a big change. How can you negotiate an offer you already accepted? Its too ...


3

Why do you think it's a big problem? You're a PhD dude. How can they tell you "Well, you spent 6 years in the highest, most rigorous academic program afforded to you, but OH---here's this gap I know nothing about, you must not be motivated!" Bull-oney. Don't explain. If they ask, tell them exactly what you said here. That's academia in a nutshell.


20

I think your attempt to be polite is doing more harm than good. I'd recommend being more succinct, which can both be professional and polite. Thank you very much for getting back to me. I'd greatly enjoy working at your company, and I'm sure I'd be a valuable asset. However, I'm currently only considering offers with an annual salary of at least XXX,...


6

You asked, Who ultimately pays for health care? In the US, it's the payor for your plan that pays the providers for the claims they make. That's a bit of a circuitous answer, but it's essentially the truth. In a true commercial health insurance plan (i.e. a product from United Healthcare, etc) the insurer is the payor. The plan will have members from ...


0

Who ultimately pays for health care? You need not bother about this much. There can be two scenarios: If the coverage is there in the company policy: If the amount which will be needed is covered by the overall / generic organization policies, then the company usually need not pay anything extra to the insurance company, it'll be considered the same as any ...


0

Tell me about yourself. It's what I ask of people if I'm there for an interview. I've already read the CV, what's you that's not work-related? The phrasing of your question shows you think you must list achievements, accomplishments and other work things as "about yourself". If you live for the job, that's ok, but I hope you work to live. What do you do ...


1

"Tell me about yourself" is always my opening interview question. At my company the candidate's technical qualifications are handled by people far senior to me. My interview really has two objectives 1) will this person fit well in our program and 2) can I sell our program to the applicant. When I ask "tell me about yourself" I am looking for a connection ...


0

Will employer's be able to look past my bad record Maybe. This depends in large part on the state of the job market. Right now, in US and European markets, there is a large unmet demand for software engineers and data science staff. That works to your advantage. If companies are having a hard time filling positions they will typically be willing to talk to ...


1

Two jobs in short time after graduation is (in my experience) not bad enough to remove your CV alltogether. Even if it was, leaving the jobs alltogether from your CV would be worse. In an interview, you should be ready to tell a convincing story why you left the jobs (without blaming the other companies too much). Having "problems" in a job is a situation ...


5

When I see someone with unusual work history my first question always is "why did you leave X, Y, and Z" and then let the candidate tell me a story. Ideally, this story will outline why they've joined each of those companies, what happened after joining that made them consider leaving, and if what steps they've taken to try to resolve it internally. If they ...


7

Here are some options for you Create a fake account for the group. It is public right, so anyone can basically join with ease? Just make a new account to do this with. Send an email to the HR person asking if they can add your friend to their list of people to hire. Let the HR recruiter at your company in on the scheme. Maybe they know somewhere your ...


2

I have taken a break too and it was a good 4.5+ years. This is how I mentally prepared myself. 'No matter what my skills are, there is a job for everyone in this world'. With that in my mind, I took concrete steps to get back in the industry. I looked at my original skill set, looked at the documentation of each for the latest versions and spent enough ...


13

At the end of your post, add something like "I have keeping an eye out for a suitable position with my employer for them, but they don't match our current openings so I'd like to help them find a good position elsewhere." That both expresses your loyalty to your employer and to your friend.


1

As a person in that very job, I can tell you that general use of PHP hasn't changed that much. Assuming you used MySQL it hasn't changed at all as per Oracle's MO (However the codebase has been forked a few times e.g. MariaDB, adding a bunch of new features). For the frontend, quite a lot has changed: JavaScript ES6 has been out long enough now for it to ...


3

You don't necessarily need to update at all, at least before looking for work. The state of play has obviously shifted since 2011, but not to the extent you couldn't pick up (for example) the modern parts of PHP on the job. Of course, another potential opportunity would be working on a reasonably old PHP codebase (there's lots around) where knowledge of any ...


8

how can I know if a recruiter has a job I'm interested in before I tell them my whole story? Ask them. Make it the first thing you do in the conversation. If they open with a bunch of questions about you, then simply ask them "First, can you tell me about the position you're calling about please?" (or a similar question in a polite, professional and ...


11

Here is how recruiters work: they usually get payed large sums of money by the employer once a candidate they referred gets a contract (usually tied to the entry-salary). They do not work for you, they work for the prospective employers. You are their raw-material, so to speak. So they like to build up a database of candidates to quickly refer a suitable ...


43

You've received several good answers, but I feel there is an important point that hasn't been emphasized enough. Hiring managers are generally looking for individuals with the skills to complete job tasks, but also for individuals who will be happy, productive, and (ideally) long-term team members. That's hard to ask directly about in an interview, so ...


3

The question to ask yourself is what do you want to get hired for? There will be company's that will be, for want of a better word, starstruck seeing an impressive name on the CV and will let that unduly influence the hiring process. Even without that there is some kudos to having an impressive name on the resume. However a more savvy hiring manager will ...


1

Far from a complete answer, but generally speaking if your goal is to work at a large multinational company in R&D, then the hardest part(s) will be: Getting a work visa for the country you want to move to. Getting a job in that country. Getting a job in your field/discipline. Once you have those 3, getting a job at a different employer is not so ...


3

If you have access to a copy of the company's employee handbook (or similar document), you may want to review it to see if there is any policy regarding rehires. Some companies won't rehire as a general policy, some will rehire as long as you weren't fired or forced to resign, and some might not care at all. An employer of mine had a paragraph dictating that ...


60

I'm wondering should I even bother? Do HRs have some sort of employee blacklist? It's unlikely that you are on a blacklist, but certainly both HR and the hiring manager will know that a year ago you left your 2-month stint. Just be sure to have an excellent answer to the inevitable question of "why did you leave us before?" Make sure your answer is clear,...


23

Apply. They'll notice your stint on your resume as soon as they glance at your resume anyway. Let them make the decision. At one company I was at, one Vice President was famous for driving away his underlings, and no one blamed his underlings for quitting. In fact in that specific case, surviving more than one week under him was seen as a net positive by ...


5

I've seen people quit and rejoin the same organization (even the same division) many times, unless you were fired for any breach of contract, in general no one holds grudges for leaving the company. As you mentioned, last time you were dissatisfied with your boss, not the overall company policy and/or work culture - so I do not see any downside in applying ...


138

What’s the downside of applying again? If you apply and get declined, the end result is you wouldn’t work there. If you don’t apply, you also would end up not working there.


0

You can put it to your resume , because HR can see that you have experience even that for only a month / 28 days. The point is , if you put it to your resume , you must can explain what you are doing in that job for a month , and the most important thing : Don't Lie and it should be fine .


4

Don't put it on your resume A resume is a marketing document. You wouldn't put in a sales brochure that the prior owner of a house left after only a month. Something should only go on the resume if it makes you look good. Just leave it off. It will seem like you were unemployed for two months (assuming your prior job search took a month). Should I ...


0

The job didn't last for a full month and ended at a 28 days Should I mention it in my CV or not as prior to that job I was made redundant after 6.5 months. You can choose to leave anything you like off of your resume. Just be prepared to explain what you have been doing for the past month without lying about it. Lies can be uncovered, and the hiring ...


11

Take the opportunities you have in front of you when they are there to be taken. You never know when another will come along. As for the decision between small and interesting, and big and pedestrian, I would choose the interesting. While there is some currency in saying "I interned for big multi-national", you're almost certainly going to be asked "and ...


-5

having criminal record , you have more than 1 job that will not affected with your reputation like working online .. etc , and I think that u are a good man because u admits that u are guilty , you can make a a lot of good things to the community for the coming years .


1

First off, it's a great sign that you recognize that stealing your company was a terrible decision. Some people never acknowledge their mistakes and end traping themselves in a endless circle of self justifications. Second, we all make mistakes. Some even break the law and, as you experienced, all, in a way or another, suffer the consequences of their ...


-6

Considering that you are just 17 years old and you have stolen just $50, I would simply tell the truth during the job interview (if they ask you about reason of ending your last job). Honestly.. stealing money is pretty common, and can even happen by mistake. I do not agree with others that you should be deleting the question or changing your name. You ...


3

Do you have a criminal record for that? Do you want to work in the same industry? If both the answers are negative you are most likely okay and may live happily ever after. Even if you had the record there is still a chance the employer-to-be You did a really stupid thing. Shit happens. Everybody makes mistakes, some more serious some lesser serious. If ...


10

There are good advices in this answer, just adding a specific point: From my own small experience in a big well known fast-food brand when I was student (starts with "Mc", actually in France but I assume it's the same in other countries), they keep internal records of past employees and share them at least nation-wide. So if it's a big fast-food brand you ...


0

If I provide links for repositories, the resume looks full of links. What is the best way to handle this situation? Although there are variety of ways to put links on resume like: Using URL shortening service, cutting www or http, there is one more simple way to handle this Embed the link into the Project Name where it appears on the resume (this fulfills ...


96

Unless the issue is being followed up on by the police, the matter is closed. Fast food is entry level work and presumably you are seeking to obtain similar work, so just leave the job off your resume and apply to other places. You may want to change your username for this question, as I Googled the name you have and can match certain identifying ...


22

I'm assuming you were just caught and fired on the spot. If so, that is likely the end of it. Unless you were arrested, indicted, found guilty, or have a warrant out for your arrest, you should be OK. Otherwise, if it was a juvenile conviction, your "record" goes away when you reach a certain age (or so I'm told - this may vary depending on which state you ...


3

I am not a lawyer. That said, many of the existing answers and comments sounded decidedly... American... to me - something you’re often at risk of on the SE network. In my country (NZ) sharing the letter you had provided for the purpose of offering you a job with another company for a different purpose would be a breach of your privacy, and you could (at ...


10

This is India. TL;DR Incidents like this used to happen in the past, happening at present and WILL continue to happen in future. You cannot expect any sense of ethics from the most companies and their HR representatives. Do not hesitate to help them realize the taste of their own medicine. Write your reviews in Glassdoor, Indeed, MouthShut, LinkedIn, ...


4

There are good answers, but I’m going to address more simply your “what can I do?” You can choose to not work for either of them, and/or you can make sure other people know what kind of people they are.


10

I just want to chime in since every existing answer thinks you did something wrong. It's possible that in your location/field it's considered unacceptable to share information about offers, but that's certainly not always the case. At least in the United States and with software engineers, telling a company you have an offer from another is completely 100% ...


6

Remember this next time someone tries to push you around. Some people will exploit you. Some people will lie to you. Some people will take advantage of you. This is an almost inevitable certainty. You'll never be able to prevent it completely, but you can learn from past mistakes to help avoid future ones. The next time someone tries to pressure you to ...


0

I do not know your location but in the US they contact your previous managers to see if you worked where you claimed you did. You can say "I no longer have contact info with my manager from 10 years ago, but here is the contact info to the company's HR." When contacted managers often will only verify if you worked there. Of course from a phone call you ...


5

FYI, if a company is forcing you to do something you know is improper, specially doing the interview, you do not want to work for them. Second, never tell the name of the company you have an interview/offer with. If your market is small, interviewer might figure the other company out quickly. Or, might even be friends with someone with decision power in the ...


2

You're right - your personality and general competency can probably be gleaned through a series of interviews. However, one of the most important parts of a reference is confirmation that you worked at the company you claimed, performing the role and responsibilities you outlined, and during the period you stated, on your application or resume. While it ...


7

I am rejecting this idea NOT because I can't provide the reference, but because it is against what I believe is right. We each have the ability to stand up for what we believe is right and what we believe is important. Am I being too difficult and egoistic or Is reference check a common thing that I need to follow and respect without questing it? ...


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