New answers tagged

1

From my experience, where you search will depend on whether you are looking for a science job in the industry or in academia and what type of science jobs you are looking for. I can only share my experience from Berlin. Some of the universities and institutes post jobs in English on their website. I'm sharing a link to Bernstein Center for Computational ...


1

Interviews are a two-way interaction. If you're left feeling upset at the interview stage, what guarantee do you have that it will be different if they employed you? They failed at the interview stage, not you. I think good honest feedback to the recruiter is worthwhile in this case, but don't expect the company to make any changes.


1

The purpose of putting projects and previous work in your resume is not to give a detailed overview of the project's implementation. They don't care what your project is or what it does. They only care about the work you have done on it. Nobody cares about a would-be one-man startup or their product (something you'll figure out pretty quickly if you end up ...


4

Ideas, in themselves, are worth usually nothing, as long as they are kept strictly in the mind of the person who generated the said ideas. Therefore, it is totally inappropriate to mention these in your CV, since you are not willing to talk about it anyway. For the best outcome, just mention in the CV the information you already have and that you can talk ...


1

Try to see the interviewers' perspective. What are they trying to find out with those questions? If they are familiar with academic careers, they might be finding out whether your prime goal is to earn more money in industry, or whether you would leave them again if you receive the right offer from some regarded research facility. Otherwise, if they have a ...


0

This depends on a couple things: 1) What do you think your manager will say if he finds out you are leaving? Will he be vindictive about it, or will he try to retain you? I've heard in software engineering it's not uncommon for a manager to hear their subordinate is thinking of leaving their company, and then instead of being vindictive the manager tries ...


7

In general, this is a bad idea. If you actually have a relationship outside of work, then maybe. Otherwise there is a chance it will get back to your company (your manager), and the repercussions of that will not be worth the inquiry. Taking a chance that this will come back and haunt you for a small chance that an acquaintance can help you find your next ...


1

Answer: “I thought about what was best long term for me and my career, and getting into the industry seemed better to me than going for a postgraduate position first. “


2

I am not sure what the standard practice is, they only told me on phone at the present that they liked me after a interview and want to proceed You are now almost ready to proceed to the negotiation phase. Once you get their contract offer, you will need to read it, and maybe even run this by the person giving you legal advice. You also may need to run ...


2

Something I haven't seen addressed yet in these answers is that there are different standards and roles for postdocs in different fields. In some areas there are many postdoctoral appointments available (relatively speaking), while in others there are few, compared to the applicants. (Anecdotally, biology might fall in the first category while math might ...


1

Academics, in general, are aware of the financial uncertainty that comes with choosing academia - They lived it. Admitting that this didn't appeal to you isn't a black mark. What could be a black mark is that your answer as phrased makes it sound like you 'fell into' your chosen path as it seemed the path of least resistance. In my opinion, it's not so ...


1

I think you may be overthinking the questions being presented. Your top 3 technologies is a question you are supposed to interpret in whatever way suits your career prospects the best. For example, as a full-stack developer, I may say: "My top 3 technologies would have to be Angular, Node.js, and SQL Server." My answer, given with my own thought process, ...


1

Ed Heal's response seems like a good option for a niche role in a small company that did not outsource headhunting. But if we are talking about a big company who might receive thousands of applications for every role: You might often have your CV read only by machines, selected only if it seems like a good fit, and then shown to a human. So, maybe the ...


2

Yes, it's very common for companies to "ghost" -- ignore -- the candidates they interview and decide not to hire. It's rude, lazy, and counterproductive, but common. One day you'll be a hiring manager. You can learn from this experience and be polite to your candidates. It's a small world, and the way we each treat people matters.


34

This was your answer: I do not want to go into academia, so for me the choice was simple. Also, the uncertainty in funding for postdocs did not appeal to me Here are the reasons you have given us: I didn't want to go into academia. I didn't want to work long hours for little pay. I didn't want uncertainty in my pay, or job security. I ...


1

I like paperwork, bureaucracy and documentation. I also like programming I worked for about 20 years as a programmer, with countless programmer colleagues. If one thing is certain, is that programmers HATE "paperwork, bureaucracy and documentation". Also, programmers are usually not very "good at organizing things" - besides their software. It is very good ...


7

This is my standard answer, taken from academia SE Here are my findings: F1: If I overwork in science, I get the opportunity to have a position in science F2: If I overwork in industry, I get the opportunity to choose the position I want for my future In my field (Physics), there are two causes for F1: C1: The supply of researchers strongly outnumbers ...


58

My answer was, "I do not want to go into academia, so for me the choice was simple. Also, the uncertainty in funding for postdocs did not appeal to me." No need to feel ashamed about it. The above answer is a perfectly good and valid response. Judging by your question the only thing you need to consider worrying about is the intonation. Basically, don't ...


3

While berry120 is absolutely right, I provide reasonings on how to address the formulation. Increasingly, doctors are younger and PhD merely a pre-requisite to a career while it used to be the more prestigious title for renowned experts. They think that a PhD is a research education for academia. Did you learn it only there that it is just a step to an ...


5

You did not say anything inherently wrong, postdocs are not necessarily better than industry experience. However, this is a matter of ingroup vs. outgroup, and a better way would have been "I was really excited about it, but after doing my PhD I wanted to experience industry for a few years as well". you don't have to be meaningful, as long as their egos ...


89

The points you're trying to make aren't inherently bad, but in these situations, framing is everything. I do not want to go into academia, so for me the choice was simple This sounds a bit like you're waving away any point of doing a postdoc if you don't plan on an academic career ("not planning to go into academia, so there's no point!") Instead, ...


1

Apply even if you think you don't meet the requirements. You would fit pretty much any position as a junior developer if you have some coding skills already. With your background it sounds like you could grow past the "junior" stage pretty fast when you get a bit of experience. Consider also applying to jobs as an IT architect because your planning skills ...


0

Just pick the most appropriate job. Write CV/Cover letter for that. Any recruiter worth his/her salt will spot that you might be suitable for one of the other roles. Also applying for multiple jobs at the same company makes you seem desperate.


3

So is this situation normal? and happens frequently? How to deal with this situation. While it is good interview etiquette to do so, unfortunately, an employer is not obligated to provide feedback on your take home assignment. There is also some gray area if you should be compensated for your time on the assignment or who technically owns the copyright ...


0

It is life and your career, shape it the way you want. Find opportunities for yourself, your boss doesn't give a damn if he is not happy that your are finding a way to do something which you want to do. Don't bother to even spend a minute on diplomatic way. There are more than enough opportunities, you don't need him or his company to make things happen for ...


1

Start looking for a new job if this one is not a good fit. From what you're saying, you don't want to continue in this job anymore so do it now - don't waste your and your company's time. Either way I’m concerned that if I leave the job before reaching a year there it will look bad on my resume. Not if you tell the interviewer that it was not a good fit ...


1

Start looking now. There's no reason not to start looking, get some feelers out with recruiters, and plan to change your career come the new year. Depending on your location and specific industry background, it could take a few months to find something decent. Unless you are going through a clearance process, there's no reason to include the job on your ...


4

Definitely solution 2 ! You can not solely rely on your boss to find you a job where he has no business implemented, if you find a good position in Asia sign the contract there and resign from your current company.


4

I had Owner of a small business on my Resume, recently. I was doing technical writing on computer security. I was able to secure a job without any problem. Some people might see it as negative, but so what. Do you really want to work at a company where the managers are scoffing at the great things you have done? Find the job where the people there truly ...


1

You can start working full time and IF you will be accepted for a master degree program, you have at least two ways: quit your current job work parallel part-time


4

Your plan is to leave for graduate school next year. But what you don't know is if you will be accepted, and if you will be accepted to a particular program. I had a coworker who had to delay med school for a year because of a difficulty passing the MCAT. You have no obligation to work forever for your employer. So unless the required training for the ...


1

If you're sure you'd leave a job after a short period, then only applying for temporary or contract work would be appropriate. You could leave without feeling that you've upset anyone and done the right thing. OTOH, I think it's nearly a year, and new graduates often get better offers once they've got a year of experience. If you did leave a permanent job, ...


1

There is a fine line between being truthful and spreading rumours. I think this is probably over the line. If you wanted to say something like this, I would say: My current company isn't doing well financially and I'm worried about my company's future, so I'm choosing to be proactive and hunt for a job earlier rather than later. This shows the ...


13

should you tell your interviewer that you're leaving the company because you haven't been paid for 3 months, and for 3 more months you didn't receive a full salary? Only do it when and if asked. Try to keep your answer brief and honest, and stick to the facts (so it does not come out as you venting out with your current employer). Anyways, I feel that ...


1

You make some good points. Yeah, there's a little bit of a negative history. On the other, you have insights that another candidate doesn't have. If it's a short-term gig, it might be a good idea to apply. You won't be there long and they don't have time to spend working with someone to explain the company. If it's long term, they might be hesitant to ...


11

“Fired” sounds so negative. You were not fired, you were laid off. And not for a reason that any reasonable person would hold against you today. No reason not to apply.


2

a company's internal recruiter will send an email saying they came across my profile and think I might be a good fit for one of their jobs; would I be willing to talk to a recruiter? When people drop off their resume at a job fair, and then are asked to talk to a recruiter they generally have started the process without knowing exactly which jobs they ...


1

Depending a little bit on the company (size, business) I don't think it is very weird that there is no job description. It could very well be that there is an opening but no proper profile or exact description yet when someone stumbled on your profile. It could be that they are looking for an addition to a team with a skill set in either this or that ...


1

Some recruiters are better than others. However, think practically: is the recruiter going to put you in contact with the company at the time of your choice? Definitely no. So you will get the job description from the recruiter anyway. You cannot know if the recruiter altered it or not. So, the answer to the other question is your best option: be happy if ...


13

Would it be unwise to submit my CV to the agency regarding this role, given my history with the company? I don't see a reason why not to send your CV and apply. Furthermore, you suspect it may be your past employer, but you are not 100% sure about that... Best case you land the job, and worst case you don't and have to keep job-hunting... but if you never ...


6

Say Dear Employer, I have decided not to continue with my application for x. Thanks, You. Avoid adding qualifiers like 'at this time', 'currently', etc. No need to actually reference the assignment. They all provide wiggle room for negotiation. Unless you are open to negotiation. Sounds like you are not. That's ok. Hence short and sweet.


8

Are you sure you want to step back? If you had time, would you do the assignment? If so, you can write something like: Due to personal reasons, I won't have time to work on your assignment within the given timeframe. I am interested in working for your company and would like to request an extension to $date. If you just want to withdraw your ...


2

Unless they told you to use one specific method of contacting them, then either phone or email will work. Depending on the information on their card they could also ask you to contact them via social media or a contact method on their website. One advantage of email is that they don't have to be near their phone and free to talk at the moment you call. ...


4

Normally I would advise emailing them at the address on the cards. But after seeing multiple spelling and other errors in such a short question it might be best to give them a ring and see if you can arrange a meeting.


0

Your job title needs to reflect the actual work performed. Being a PhD Candidate may be hard work, but your education belongs under the "Education" section of your resume. Typically a PhD candidate is performing actual research of some form within their chosen field. If you are a research assistant, you use that and you describe the nature of the work you ...


2

Put PhD Candidate. Contrary to what others suggest here IMHO it is not lying to put it under work experience (where I am from it is considered a job and you get the normal job benefits). It might depend on the rest of your resume and the exact job you are applying for whether it is better to put it under education or work experience. I have gone both ways ...


1

Well, I would start planning a baby after at least 6 months in the new company. I cannot say for everyone, but for many of us, first couple of months at new place with new tasks, people, bosses and projects are a bit stressful. In this time I would strongly recommend not to plan a baby. You have to prepare yourself not only physically, bur also mentally to ...


3

also there will be great a risk to get a offer if I discloses it. Yes, you are right. The enlightened ones / larger corps may give you an offer, but otherwise be prepared to be skipped from offers on disclosing the details. I have a guilty feeling that, actually I am cheating them, as I will be going for a 6 month maternity leave Think: How would it ...


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