New answers tagged

0

You asked, How would I fill out the accomplishments section without it being a regurgitation of my resume? In general, you don't need to be concerned about it being a regurgitation. In practice, it's common for that text box to essentially be a cut and paste from an applicant's resume. This leads to an obvious question, why would employers make me do ...


0

You asked, What should I do now for switching First, you need to decide: What do you want to switch to? What is your dream job? What kind of work do you want to do, and for what kind of company? Many people who complain, my career is ruined! I don't have the skills to get a job! are really just either not looking for the right next job, or they're not ...


3

I'd say, as long as you can defend the reasoning behind short lived employments you'd be fine. I wouldn't worry too much about the 1+ years as they could be seen as 'projects'. You'd need a good reason for the first one though, together with the gaps. As for the gaps, I like this indeed article: There are a few easy-to-follow guidelines for how to ...


2

First of all your career is never ruined, but it might take an extra step to reach the position you want to. If that is an IT company, make sure you know exactly what you want to do in an 'IT Company' and start doing projects in that direction. What I have seen with other people in similar positions is switching to consultancy, contract work or temporary ...


2

This is based on my personal experience applying to companies with their own job portals (Software development) and interactions with HR when filling such forms. Don't worry too much about the box, pick any top X things (can be top 3 or 5) that stand out in your resume, and put it there. Your resume and Cover Letter are there to help the HR/hiring manager ...


1

Amazon Web Services actually offers more than 150 services and tools in 2019. It is unreasonable to expect a developer to know all services in detail – especially not the new very domain-specific services. But there are a couple of services that have been around for quite a while and that are the base of every infrastructure: EC2, RDS, S3, elastic load ...


0

"Let me know how it goes" is what you want to say to your mentor. If you don't hear anything, wait a few weeks after you contact has started their new position. Then reach out to them and ask if they are enjoying the new job. The reason for doing this two-fold: They may have made a horrible decision and are already looking at moving again, in which ...


2

Impossible to say exactly the scope but I would imagine the very least would be integrating AWS with a CI/CD tool like Jenkins. I would imagine the very least knowing what CI/CD is but not necessarily AWS. Also there's the whole aspect of configuring the AWS for DBs and things like that. I would imagine you'd need to talk to the job about exactly what they ...


4

I'm seeing a lot of senior engineer jobs that require AWS experience in addition to software development experience. Can anyone expand on what this means? Does it refer to working with AWS instances, creating servers etc. Although this is job-specific, yes, that is basically what they are expecting from possible candidates. Besides knowing how to code, ...


0

is it normal to ask for them to share my resume as well? It does happen occasionally but it's fairly rare and it may actually violate existing contracts, so you need to proceed very carefully Check your contract and/or employee handbook. Many companies have "anti-poaching" clauses in their contracts which explicitly forbids departing employees to connect ...


4

You asked, I wanted to know if it's normal or accepted to ask a technical lead, or any colleague I suppose, if they feel comfortable to inquire at places they interview at if they're looking for additional spots to be filled This is a little tricky to answer, since "normal or accepted" will vary from region to region, and also perhaps more importantly ...


4

Does it make sense to write cover letters ? Yes, but ONLY if it's the right cover letter. There is an astonishing amount of confusion of what a resume and a cover letter is for. Resume: This is describes you and your professional history. Your experiences, skills, achievements typically by going through your education and work history in chronological ...


0

You have mentioned CV in your question rather than resume which makes it sound like you are not in a location where resumes are common such as America. There resumes are generally advised to be limited in size, to one or two pages and are very succinct and to the point so the cover letter is an opportunity to give more information and to supplement the ...


0

I don't think you really have enough evidence here to say that they didn't read them or that they never do. Assuming you're referring to the application you talk about in your other question it may be that they would have read the cover letter and used it as some form of tie-breaker in the event of trying to decide between two candidates who looked equal on ...


0

If it's a job that stands out to you, it's worth doing. When I went through my first job application process after I finished university I wrote one cover letter for a job that felt perfect. I didn't with any of the others. I ended up getting an interview at that place, and they even mentioned the cover letter in the interview saying that there aren't many ...


7

Has it sense to write cover letters? Yes, but as I see it, CV's are more relevant for the application process compared to Cover Letters. Both are important, but CV's are more. In my experience, there are cases where Cover Letters are not required nor asked (some even don't have a place where to put your cover letter), but CV's are always asked or required. ...


3

I have worked in one kind of job, but realized that it is not the right job for me.I decided to apply for both new kind of jobs and the original type of job, but it seems I am stuck. Don't despair - you aren't the only person who got into a job/career and found it wasn't for them! For current type of job, I am not good enough. But on the other side, when ...


-4

There are three possible issues for why you are unemployable for the positions you are applying: You lack some of the skills required You lack the experience You lack the credentials(an education or cert.) A maximum of one of these can apply to you for you to get the job. This leaves you with four options if you want to get a job you are unqualified for: ...


18

Thank you for CV, but we just employed new colleague. This most likely means your resume was received, but they have already filled the position.


9

So far, existing answers have focused on the discrimination angle--which is correct and important. However, because you are applying for overseas jobs which will require a work permit or immigration visa, I have a different take on the answer. The Netherlands and New Zealand companies were rude, no question about it. They probably were discriminating ...


9

Regarding (1): As someone who's been involved in reviewing, interviewing and hiring applicants in IT (developers): If you put this information forward and make sure I know it's important to you, finding "Antitheist Gnostic Atheist" at the top of your Twitter feed and seeing questions like this on SE will certainly make me wonder about both your perspective ...


29

Unless you draw unusual particular attention to your online name, it isn't going to harm you. For example, don't show up at an interview with a t-shirt saying "I am Overlord Dragon". And don't use phrases like "we humans" during an interview. You won't appear "less controllable" solely due to your online name. You'll only appear that way if you act that ...


3

IMHO, Unless it can directly affect your work duties, you are not responsible to disclose it. Second, in current situation you would not be able to prove discrimination, at later stages of the employment process it may be more possible. And finally, when you will be able to prove it, you will not have to, because company will be aware of it as well and ...


4

Many countries have laws preventing discrimination on the basis of disability. You could have a legal case against the prospective employer if you can prove that discrimination has taken place. However, the other side of that is that many employers are therefore aware of the law and very aware of the repercussions should they be found guilty of ...


20

My only question would be, is there an ethical way not to disclose my disability or disclose it in such a way that it doesn't make the second party afraid of hiring me? In short, I would not disclose the information until you have to. Let the company get to know you first. Your best bet IMO is for them to actually meet you face to face first -- ...


0

First, I would not discuss this concern until you have an offer in hand. Second, in the shops I work in, developers have frequent collaborative meetings, and while remote participation is possible, it is normally more awkward. I want my employees to be happy with their work, but the quality and quantity of the work, and their integration with the team is ...


17

You're not an employee, you're an intern. Company B can't be accused of "taking employees" if you're not an employee. Do what you feel is best for you and what feels the most "right" to you. If there's any animosity, it has nothing to do with you. Don't let the actions, words, feelings of others dictate your career path. The only thing you need be concerned ...


1

If you are going to be applying for jobs in a directly related field then yes, it might be somewhat relevant - it shows you have got a genuine interest and you might even be able to bring some of your findings to the job. But it's only going to be either a positive, in that rare case, or fairly irrelevant. What is going to be more important, for a graduate ...


0

Your instincts are correct, you need to address this before getting an offer/starting. If you try to negotiate after then you may well seem demanding and might end up fighting the company culture (in which case you are unlikely to get the result you want). Many companies offer remote work, some jobs are almost exclusively remote. For development it's pretty ...


3

Undergraduate topics likely don't matter all that much - especially within a discipline (like engineering). A robotics dissertation will be just as impressive to a company that builds software as one that builds robotic vacuums, and would be considered similarly to any impressive engineering dissertation. Future employers are likely to consider your ...


1

I've found that it's always best to do the ramp up in person, for all seniorities I've worked with. You being a junior means your ramp up will probably be a bit longer. If I were in the company, I'd prefer that you work on site all days at least for the first month, for this reason. I suggest you straight up offer this to the company, so they can see you're ...


1

Do they need to know? because this is often that is something that can be mostly omitted. If for example you fill in a form where they have a "reason for ending previous emplyment" field you could fill in After a few months I found out I did not fit the company culture and we decided to part ways. This is both true and something that happens all the ...


5

It's important to place some context around your question. It sounds like you're still in school and are considering your first job after school. Employers look at fresh grads slightly differently than experienced staff, and in general, school-related attributes become less and less important as you gain more years of working experience. As a hiring manager, ...


4

Firstly you have my sympathies - it sounds like you were in a toxic situation and I know how soul-destroying that can be. So I absolutely understand why you wanted out ASAP but don't tip-toe around this by trying to claim you "quit", you didn't you were fired and with cause. As you say this was some time ago so you've had time to reflect on this and I'm ...


3

If flexibility is important for you, you may want to consider picking job offers from companies which advertise flexible hours or remote work. It is now widely understood that flexible working conditions constitute an advantage, so companies which are able to offer such flexibility to you usually advertise it. Interviewing with the right companies from the ...


30

In a similar vein to Snow's answer, you're free to ask about how flexible their work policies are. It will likely come up in an interview, depending on the questions they ask, and you can seamlessly talk about your successes in that remote work environment without having to awkwardly bring it up out of context. However, since you are relatively ...


24

You might consider negotiating your offer outside of the interview. Keep the interview to demonstrating your capabilities and asking questions that will help you decide if an opportunity with the company would be exciting. Instead of asking for remote work in an interview, express you desire for remote days to the recruiter. He or she can help you ...


95

In the interview, simply ask what their flexible working policy is and indicate that you've found remote working to be productive in the past. Then see what their policy/approach is and work from there. You'll probably find out here at what point you'll be allowed to work remotely (e.g. after the probation period has elapsed). You need not make a big deal ...


1

So as an intern with little professional experience and very little practical guidance worked for a company to take a new application from concept to reality in only a few short month? That's amazing! Definitely an experience worth hyping when you start talking to other employers about hiring you. So the code quality isn't what you wished it were. As you ...


1

Sometimes the skills surrounding the project are more imressive than the project itself. These could include the following communication and presentation: You did a project for nontechnical people. So you had to talk to them about the project itself, its scope and features, technical details. Communication to nontechnical people or people with a different ...


2

Consider that it's hard to sell anything without having an audience to sell to. What kind of job do you want? What kind of employer do you want to work for? How you sell will depend as much on these factors as on the personal experience you're trying to sell. So, before you go trying to write up the ideal resume, consider the following: What sort of ...


0

On your resume pitch this project as a prototype-- a proof-of-concept project. Emphasize that you got it working. Prototypes are definitely hard work, and definitely work worth doing. You finished a prototype during your internship. That's an accomplishment worth bragging about. Did you or your internship-host company use your project or the prototype ...


6

An internship is a learning opportunity. It helps you a) pick important skills that you can use in your early career b) have something to talk of during your initial interviews Other students are right, they've experienced a different way of working than what is taught at the university, and so they've picked up "industry skills". However, you too have ...


1

Short answer: You don't sell what you have, but you show it. As you mentioned, you developed a "Prototype" and "a lot of corners have been cut and 'best practice' was often cut in favor of new features/speed of development due to time constraints". So, you would go demonstrate your prototype as-is and present it to potential buyers, and once someone likes ...


2

Would it be inappropriate to send only Bob a thank you email, and not the rest of the panel? I unfortunately do not remember the name of one of the 5 panel members. That is unfortunate. But it appears that sending it to just one is the best you can do, so it makes sense to go ahead and send your thanks to Bob. Make sure you ask Bob to thank the others ...


2

It was Bob and one other employee that interviewed me first, and I sent a single thank you email to both of them. The HR recruiter did not participate in either of these interviews, and for this reason, I am not sending a thank you to this recruiter. Is this the right move? It's okay. One of the members of the panel, I'll call Bob, is the would-be ...


-1

Approach the supervisor and ask for a reference. Be polite. Your supervisor will either say yes or no. Most likely yes. It would be very unusual for someone to give a poor reference in the UK because companies (and universities) are worried about the possibility of being pursued in court for defamation or similar.


2

From everyone comments I can conclude the best way is not to provide their name at all and avoid mentioning their names during the interview. Their names come in my thesis and in my publications. However, that does not mean it is the end of teh world. I graduated and lost contact with them. I cannot force them to write a reference letter for me and I do not ...


-1

Depends on the country. In the USA: Give them the name. Tell the supervisor, and tell them that you will hold them responsible if they damage your prospects. As the supervisor, I would be very reluctant to say anything bad, especially if you got a letter from the university apologising for the supervisors behaviour.


0

You definitely should. The excuse is perfectly reasonable, and they may be able to help in ways unexpected. Such as we can make your job telecommutable, or move you into a role that is we have a branch in that city / ready to open one we know people in companies there who would love to have you. Can we recommend you?


Top 50 recent answers are included