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286

"Hey, you made this X change to that Y function. This change breaks my code because it's not taking Z in account, and Z is what happens on my side. Is it ok with you to do K to fix it?" You need to make this less personal. There is no my code and your code. Both of you are employees of a company, and that company owns the code. You merely wrote it, but ...


205

What do you advice me to do? Grin and bear it. Pay attention in spite of your boredom. Take notes. Not everything can be within your control. Not everything can be exactly the way you'd prefer. Remember this when you are eventually in the position where you can lead meetings. Create and follow a tight agenda. Make sure only those who need to be there are ...


135

Obviously, criticizing your elders isn't a great move and should be avoided. Belittling juniors is also a bad thing. One thing to remember is that loose coding practices doesn't necessarily lead to poor compiled code. So, if it works, it works, and the guys know how to maintain their own code. People can, and do, get defensive about their own parts of ...


133

As a slight frame challenge to your question, you need to get some clarity on what the role requires and then ask questions specific to that. In other words, I have the feeling that your real problem is that you don't have a clear idea of what skills you want in this person. Find that out and the questions will follow. Stop over-thinking "easy" versus "hard"...


129

However, I have no problems working with very junior employees but I know that in the first half year/year they will require a lot of tutoring and may even slow down the projects our team is working on. Every new employee slows down projects while they are being trained and becoming comfortable in the position. In fact, we are looking now for a new ...


120

Bring a pad and write, write down anything. It will keep you from looking like a zombie and if the person says something useful, you'll already have pen and paper in hand. I have a hard time sitting still, so this works for me, I need to get that energy out of me. If you're restless as well, this may help.


113

For a Junior, it's less about what they know, and more about who they are. If they don't know the answer to a technical question, follow up with something like? You said you don't know. How would you find out, and then implement it? For the tech questions themselves, have sets of Basic, intermediate, and advanced. Climb the difficulty tree until you ...


108

After two weeks, I can say with confidence that I clearly didn't create value for this company and the other developers that helped me could have done my job instead of spending time with me. You will not create "net positive" value for the company for much longer than that (even when I hire senior developers I assume they aren't net positive for 6 months). ...


102

All code should be peer reviewed (but I've worked in a lot of places where that never happened). How clean is clean? There should be coding standards and guidelines; ask for them. As to how "picky" you should be; that depends on the code being reviewed. Some people like having blank lines pointed out to them, and spacing. Others prefer you spot potential ...


96

A few points in addition to the other answers: Accept that, as a junior, you don't know everything :-)  There may be reasons for the style of code that you are unaware of, such as: Avoiding unnecessary changes to working code (keeping diffs manageable, avoiding introducing unnecessary bugs, &c). Keeping related code so it can be seen together.  (No ...


95

I've always been a believer in following your "gut" and your gut is telling you that this guy won't be a good fit. You'll probably turn out to be right. If it were me, I'd follow that feeling and tell the guy "we're going in a different direction" and just leave it that. If you have to bring him back in, interview him as you normally would but when he ...


91

Unfortunately, it's not your decision. You can either do it or they will find someone for your position who will. Tell him and then write him a letter of recommendation and offer to speak on his behalf to anyone wanting to hire him. You just need to make sure that you support management with your recommendation, if asked. You can talk him up about how ...


85

I think it would be extremely rare (e.g. almost never) to let anyone go after 2-4 weeks (for performance related things), and rarer still for that to happen to a junior developer, so take a deep breath and relax. Now let's figure out how to "get up to speed" and begin to feel a bit better about your position. They hired you after looking at your resume and ...


52

Upon request to make it an answer... It sounds like you've already gone to bat for this employee, but management wants him gone for their own reasons. And that really sucks, but you can help mitigate the negative impact of his firing. If you've supervised his work directly, you can offer to supply him with a reference or letter or recommendation for future ...


50

You are the technical lead. You have a subordinate that is not only stuck on a problem for a long time without delivering, but actively refuses to accept help. You need a one-to-one where you explain the problem, that she is not delivering anything, and that she was given help that would have solved the problem, but refused to accept it, and ask her what ...


50

As Joe mentioned in the comments, smile and deal with it. You are a junior developer. Unless you are the guy organizing the meeting and everyone that is attending the meeting is inferior to you, you don't get to "do" anything about a boring meeting. Although, I've found this one trick VERY helpful when I am bored in a meeting. INVOLVE YOURSELF! Contribute. ...


46

Hmmm....so instead of training an already known value (the jr. developer), the management wants to fire him, bring in someone new they don't know, hope that person 'fits' into the org/team, can understand the business quickly, and start contributing to the team. Also, if money is no object, makes one wonder why they don't just bring on another without ...


44

I worked there only 2 weeks You need to give it a lot more than just 2 weeks. Everyone feels a bit overwhelmed when they initially start a programming job. Your first few weeks/months will involve unlearning lots of things you were taught in school/bootcamp and learning how real software work is done. Nobody understands all the code at first glance. ...


35

Let's review your company options: Wait months for a perfect candidate - If you have reasonable expectation that such candidate will appear, and you can handle workload for months without him, this is a decent option. Hire more junior candidate and train him - At first, this will cost money and increase workload. "may even slow down the projects" is usually ...


32

"Underperform[ing] because [you] didn't like [your] tasks" is the sign of a very poor employee, and, in my mind, you are rather lucky that you didn't get fired given that you repeatedly made changes where your new "features were breaking existing functionalities, or that [your] bug fixes weren't working". It seems like you are now aware of that, and are ...


30

You seem to be a part of a team that is more experienced than you yourself are. The fact that these people have been working together for longer, and perhaps feel that their work is higher quality may lead to the attitude you're experiencing today. I have no way to tell whether you've done anything to make the rest of the team feel like their behavior is ...


29

This is not a highly talented valuable worker. This is a prima donna. People like this in a team if they don't learn to tone down and see the bigger pictures, are not a big asset in that sort of position, and can be a liability if they affect team morale. You have already tried the nice way. Take away her status where she thinks it's her responsibility to ...


29

Don't get hung up on junior/senior. No one is a perfect developer, and everyone - regardless of title - has the opportunity to improve. That said, it's important to consider the context. If you're picking out old work that's not really important or relevant at the moment, and then telling them why it's bad quality, that's not going to come off well. On the ...


28

I never made any progress in these things formal parts of his job duties That may be part of the problem. People (and particularly juniors) respond to incentives. It's possible this individual is focusing on whatever he views as the formal parts of his job duties and not so much on these other tasks. it's as though he thinks that being a developer ...


25

I started out in tech support. I would have loved to have your friend's job, but tech support was the closest I could get. They put me in my first coding job because I was horrible and unmotivated at tech support. They were unable to restrain me from goofing off and writing code all day instead of doing what I should've been, so they changed my job title. It ...


23

As a tech lead, you need to be willing to exercise your power. I have insane respect for you that you are averse to doing so (people can be bad with power). But the reason you have this power is as a last resort. If she is affecting an actual customer product, you must force her compliance At the end of the day, she won't be responsible for the product. ...


23

What many people do is create a sandbox application that isn't affected by the terms of the NDA that uses the same methods and get that to work. This way, it's possible to ask for outside help because there's no data or information being shared as part of that work. When you get your generic code working, you can place that into your project with a fair ...


22

First things first - it is not unusual for dependency code to break downstream code. There are development practices that can mitigate this, like good specification, documentation, and tests. But that is not the answer to your question. Hey, you made this X change to that Y function. This change breaks my code because it's not taking Z in account, and Z ...


21

I run an online community of managers called Resolve where we share and learn from each other's experiences. This question has come and here is a response from one of our community members. Become a manager of solutions and develop your teams. An open door does not equal being the answer database for your employees. Becoming a manager of ...


21

Put simply: yes, it would be a major concern for anyone hiring you as a software developer. Being somewhat blunt, it looks like you don't have the skills to be a successful software developer. If your CV comes onto my desk, I'd probably reject it if you were applying to be a software developer. On the other hand, if you were applying to be a data analyst, ...


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