Hot answers tagged

204

What do you advice me to do? Grin and bear it. Pay attention in spite of your boredom. Take notes. Not everything can be within your control. Not everything can be exactly the way you'd prefer. Remember this when you are eventually in the position where you can lead meetings. Create and follow a tight agenda. Make sure only those who need to be there are ...


135

Obviously, criticizing your elders isn't a great move and should be avoided. Belittling juniors is also a bad thing. One thing to remember is that loose coding practices doesn't necessarily lead to poor compiled code. So, if it works, it works, and the guys know how to maintain their own code. People can, and do, get defensive about their own parts of ...


134

As a slight frame challenge to your question, you need to get some clarity on what the role requires and then ask questions specific to that. In other words, I have the feeling that your real problem is that you don't have a clear idea of what skills you want in this person. Find that out and the questions will follow. Stop over-thinking "easy" versus "hard"...


129

However, I have no problems working with very junior employees but I know that in the first half year/year they will require a lot of tutoring and may even slow down the projects our team is working on. Every new employee slows down projects while they are being trained and becoming comfortable in the position. In fact, we are looking now for a new ...


120

Bring a pad and write, write down anything. It will keep you from looking like a zombie and if the person says something useful, you'll already have pen and paper in hand. I have a hard time sitting still, so this works for me, I need to get that energy out of me. If you're restless as well, this may help.


114

For a Junior, it's less about what they know, and more about who they are. If they don't know the answer to a technical question, follow up with something like? You said you don't know. How would you find out, and then implement it? For the tech questions themselves, have sets of Basic, intermediate, and advanced. Climb the difficulty tree until you ...


108

After two weeks, I can say with confidence that I clearly didn't create value for this company and the other developers that helped me could have done my job instead of spending time with me. You will not create "net positive" value for the company for much longer than that (even when I hire senior developers I assume they aren't net positive for 6 months). ...


102

All code should be peer reviewed (but I've worked in a lot of places where that never happened). How clean is clean? There should be coding standards and guidelines; ask for them. As to how "picky" you should be; that depends on the code being reviewed. Some people like having blank lines pointed out to them, and spacing. Others prefer you spot potential ...


96

A few points in addition to the other answers: Accept that, as a junior, you don't know everything :-)  There may be reasons for the style of code that you are unaware of, such as: Avoiding unnecessary changes to working code (keeping diffs manageable, avoiding introducing unnecessary bugs, &c). Keeping related code so it can be seen together.  (No ...


85

I think it would be extremely rare (e.g. almost never) to let anyone go after 2-4 weeks (for performance related things), and rarer still for that to happen to a junior developer, so take a deep breath and relax. Now let's figure out how to "get up to speed" and begin to feel a bit better about your position. They hired you after looking at your resume and ...


50

As Joe mentioned in the comments, smile and deal with it. You are a junior developer. Unless you are the guy organizing the meeting and everyone that is attending the meeting is inferior to you, you don't get to "do" anything about a boring meeting. Although, I've found this one trick VERY helpful when I am bored in a meeting. INVOLVE YOURSELF! Contribute. ...


44

I worked there only 2 weeks You need to give it a lot more than just 2 weeks. Everyone feels a bit overwhelmed when they initially start a programming job. Your first few weeks/months will involve unlearning lots of things you were taught in school/bootcamp and learning how real software work is done. Nobody understands all the code at first glance. ...


35

Let's review your company options: Wait months for a perfect candidate - If you have reasonable expectation that such candidate will appear, and you can handle workload for months without him, this is a decent option. Hire more junior candidate and train him - At first, this will cost money and increase workload. "may even slow down the projects" is usually ...


29

This is not a highly talented valuable worker. This is a prima donna. People like this in a team if they don't learn to tone down and see the bigger pictures, are not a big asset in that sort of position, and can be a liability if they affect team morale. You have already tried the nice way. Take away her status where she thinks it's her responsibility to ...


29

Don't get hung up on junior/senior. No one is a perfect developer, and everyone - regardless of title - has the opportunity to improve. That said, it's important to consider the context. If you're picking out old work that's not really important or relevant at the moment, and then telling them why it's bad quality, that's not going to come off well. On the ...


21

Put simply: yes, it would be a major concern for anyone hiring you as a software developer. Being somewhat blunt, it looks like you don't have the skills to be a successful software developer. If your CV comes onto my desk, I'd probably reject it if you were applying to be a software developer. On the other hand, if you were applying to be a data analyst, ...


21

I am going to answer differently to existing answers. I have no control over the meeting. (I cannot tell them to stop doing this, and do something else.) I think as an employee you can find ways to exert some kind of influence. You might raise the issue with your line managers, talk with your colleagues, raise it on company all hands or off site ...


19

I'm worried in case I do get a response back and then I don't bother replying, the company will put me on some sort of 'waste of time' list which could affect me in the future if I am looking to move companies. If that's your worry, then you shouldn't apply. FWIW, if I got a resume, read it, short-listed it, invited you in for an interview, and then ...


18

While there is a lot of good mileage in your friend learning Test Driven Development (TDD), the fact that he/she is being disciplined by multiple managers for falling short in Telepathy skills means that this looks like a toxic workplace. The person that never makes mistakes never makes anything at all. My advice can only be to make rapid strides towards ...


18

No, it is not okay to expect that of your employees. You say: Assume a non-toxic environment. A manager saying "You better study over the weekend or you're fired first thing on Monday" is, unquestionably, a reason to pack your things and go. But how is that not exactly what is implied when you tell a junior walking in the door that you expect them to ...


18

Welcome to the Jungle. :) Yes. It's normal. You're a junior. It's expected that you will not have a clue, and that's why they're having you do what you're doing. Ask questions. Get the understanding. Ask what you can read on your own time to help you develop an understanding. Be willing to work hard even by spending a few hours outside ...


16

30 year software development professional here. Perhaps some insight I've gleaned might be of help. Don't sh*t where you sleep. Everyone thinks everyone else's code is crap. This is a pretty natural reaction to reading any code that is difficult to understand. Railing about it, unless you have a good reason to (eg: telling your boss why a feature change is ...


15

When I read the title I thought you meant a highly intelligent person who is critical of her seniors and is right in her criticism, a kind of a maverick who's too straightforward. However, if the architect wasn't expected to and wasn't paid for working on the tasks she accused him of not performing, the feedback she gave him was unfair. Unfair feedback can ...


15

Well, there is no one solution for all situations. Make all efforts to understand what they discuss about. You may get important information for life even from random "bla bla". If you are not very pressed with work, tough deadlines etc. - just be nice and suffer :) Maybe they suffer also when you speak :) If you are really pressed by time - ask politely if ...


15

You can criticise the code, no need to criticise the developers. My guess is they want to do better and a friendly comment from a workmate, worded with care, will be welcomed. It's normal to get in a hurry and be a little sloppy--reminders help correct that. If you've been a developer for 5+ years then the junior/senior demarcation doesn't make a lot of ...


14

Think about the first time you found someone who lacked experience but could code and learn. Would you have successfully trained the person by now? How much longer would have been needed? That's your guideline. How long is the test assignment? I personally try to avoid companies that give long assignments, especially if I already have a job, because I ...


14

Am I freaking out too much or are my concerns justified? You are still new. You need to give it more time. We all go through a similar phase in a new career. I know I did - several times with several careers. Give it more time. Do your best. Keep asking your boss for guidance. my hope is that this situation will relax in the future with some time and ...


13

Are there any indications or warning signs of junior developers being let go after 2-4 weeks. And is this common practice. There's nothing in your story which makes me think so. Of course, what happened before you landed this job, or how long your commute is is irrelevant for letting you go. If they let people go after such a period, it usually because such ...


12

The top answer is very good and should suffice I guess. I only want to add a small detail as a person who was interviewed for a junior position several times not so long ago. Sometimes during an interview I had an impression while being asked ('hard'?) tech questions that interviwers were rather trying to show off their knowledge than to know about mine: ...


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