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139

You need to make HR aware that there are potential criminal charges between two of their employees resulting from an out of work incident, as this will affect the professional relationships of everyone involved, including yourself as a witness to the case. Other than that, let the trained HR people sort it out.


109

You need to talk to a lawyer before you say anything to anyone about this incident. Don't assume you're safe because you didn't do anything; the law is complex and the other people involved may not remember things the way you do. Don't assume your job is safe because it happened outside of work; HR protects the company, not you, and they often take the ...


79

You are a witness. You need to refuse to discuss the case at work except to parties such as HR and your boss with a need to know (and they only need to know there was a problem, not details). As far as coworker A, treat him at work with exactly as much professionalism as you treat everyone else. Likely he will not respond the same, but you need to stay ...


68

People can say all sorts of things. Whether you can be sued "for damages" by your employer is a question for a lawyer and depends on your location, situation and contract. By and large, employees are protected from such shenanigans but there can always be loopholes. In my non-legal opinion your boss is blowing hot air because he knows you're underpaid, ...


51

It's not just CEOs. It's pretty unusual for anyone in a leadership position to step down and take a lower role in that organization. To start with it usually makes for a strained relationship between the former leader and their new peers. If someone didn't get on well with the former leader they may try to take some sort of revenge now they are equals. Or ...


46

I'm Canadian, we have similar laws but not identical. This is something that needs to be addressed by your company HR department. That behaviour is unacceptable and cannot be condoned. That being said, I'd also start looking for another job. You've probably done nothing wrong to warrant this behavior by others, so this may seem unfair. However, a company ...


38

Now, that last line. I see that as a threat and I was wondering if it's even legal for them to say that. It is a clear threat, unless and until you have been done anything which is against your employment contract. So, you might want to cross-verify that, just to be double sure. Do hire a lawyer (if you can afford), before you submit your resignation so ...


37

In cases like this what should I do? Learn your lesson, never do it again, and never, ever, ever think that you can completely delete anything that has been posted to the web. As for smoothing over the current situation, the only thing you can really do is apologize to your boss (which I assume you have already done) and show that this will never happen ...


33

I've been assigned to run interviews for a position. What kind of training have you done? Have you told the interviewing team what they are expected to do? Specifically, have you informed them regarding the laws that must be adhered to during the interview process? When the team said "it's hard to relate to people that are so much older than us. We should ...


27

If their "personal belief" regarding not hiring someone is based on a protected characteristic in that jurisdiction, (e.g. gender, religion, age, race, etc in the US, UK etc) then yes that's discrimination, it's pretty much the definition of it actually. Hair colour, or fondness for potatoes (or other root vegetables) isn't protected directly anywhere that ...


25

Do you fear that A may physically assault you? If you have any such fear you should immediately make HR and/or the police aware of that. If you only fear that A may retaliate against you in ways that impact your work and/or career, I don't think you need to act based on fear alone. Until there is evidence of retaliation against you it would be most ...


24

All you can do is apologize and demonstrate that you've learned the lesson. There's not much you can do about it now and I'm sure that you'll be more careful about asking for coding help in the future. Don't forget that it's often better to ask within your own team first.


24

You asked three questions, Is my employer discriminating against non-parents? If so, is this discrimination allowed by UK employment law? Employment law in the UK currently classifies parental leave as a protected right. That is, the law protects the right of parents to take leave. This seems to inherently imply that such leave is not considered ...


23

It is harassment. Don't take this lightly, you don't want it to escalate behind your back. It's also a threat, sometimes the sort of people who would say something like this can get physical, already the implication is there is more than one and this is not the end of it, it's not a friendly 'heads up'. I got a lot of this in blue collar jobs and bouncing, ...


20

Since you have left rather than taking it to HR at the time, any complaint will almost certainly be dismissed as "sour grapes" unless extremely well documented, which by your own statement isn't the case. You chose to get out of it rather than fighting it. You've made your decision.


17

I am not a lawyer, but according to this interview by Spiegel Online with a lawyer specialized in German employment law, public transportation strike is not a valid excuse to come late to work. Employers can cut pay in the short run, and could even pursue termination if the problem repeats. What you could do to get to work on time despite the strike: Find ...


17

Telling the boss that someone is pregnant and therefore shouldn't get an assignment is a bad, bad, BAD idea. Either the boss will act on it, in which case Bekkie is part of something that is probably illegal (discrimination based on pregnancy) or the boss will be annoyed, in which case she'll take it out on Bekkie. Bekkie needs to keep her mouth shut.


17

At any career level, having someone replace you, and then having to witness daily how that new person performs at your previous the job (either better or worse than you), would be extremely frustrating to most folks. Further, the new boss doesn't want to deal with the baggage and office politics of a disgruntled employee who has been demoted. Finally, as ...


16

Depends greatly on the company and their policies Note that it is best to ask ones own company to get details on the steps that they will take, since it will vary by company. With that said here are some examples of things one could expect. Stop Pay For hourly employees if he does not show up he does not get paid (exceptions do apply). So if he stopped ...


16

This is completely unacceptable in many ways, including legally. While only a court can definitively pronounce on what is harassment, this is virtually certain to fall within that category. You should immediately take this up with the company. Start with your boss, but if he does nothing (or he is one of the people involved) go to HR. Tell them what has ...


14

Termination isn't a discussion, the employee cannot threaten you to retain the job. You mention you have reasons for letting the employee go - I assume those are documented and dated. Release the employee and, if need be, get a lawyer.


14

Between jobsites, yes but not between your home and the first/last site. California defines the term “hours worked” as “the time during which an employee is subject to the control of an employer, and includes all time the employee is suffered or permitted to work, whether or not required to do so.” I.W.C. Wage Orders, Section 2


13

If we assume that you're working for Evil Corp with demonically aggressive lawyers then, of course, you're taking a risk. You're violating the letter of your contract. And an aggressive lawyer can certainly argue about whether your performance is affected, whether the markets are different, whether you're competing with some subsidiary of the corporation, ...


13

It sounds like you're in quite a jam. When you mention that you don't want to hire a lawyer, you'll get very vague answers here. I'll try my best. So, to add insult to injury, our junior HR manager has also ordered that nobody may carry a pocket knife, even a multitool like a leatherman, unless it's for religious reasons. First, on the the knife-...


13

Note: due to a preliminary injunction issued by a federal court judge on November 22nd the new overtime rule is on hold and will not go in effect on December 1st 2016. As of June 2017, the rules remain on hold with the DOL issuing an RFI while the administration is expected to block the rules or, more likely, significantly reduce the salary requirement. A ...


13

Generally, this is how it works: Time from your residence, to the FIRST work location of your day, is unpaid. Travel time to any subsequent locations, after the first location, is paid time. Travel time back to the first location is paid time. Going home from there is unpaid time.


12

When a situation goes to HR trying to enforce absolutes rather than a first step of negotiating for peace among employees - I would say the situation has already gone quite far from normal. In something this weird, the first question is really - do you still want to work here? And what are your job prospects? The real bottom line is that you could end up ...


12

You should stay as uninvolved as is possible considering you're a witness. Don't discuss it with HR unless they ask you for your version of events. Nothing good for you personally will come out of stirring the pot in any direction. The only situation I can think of where you should take it to HR is if your colleague becomes obnoxious or tries to coerce you ...


12

You can re-read your contract, but a few things: Most of those contracts force you to repay the bonus unless you are laid off; they often have language that says something like if you decide to leave or if you are let go for performance reasons. Edit in response to the language being added: "Should you choose to end your employment" means that if you decide ...


12

PTO is the wrong thing to be worried about here. It's kind of like someone running over your dog and then focusing on how it messed up the edging on your lawn. There is basically no reason for a salaried employee to ever consent to working 30 hours straight, let alone come back to work another 20 hours shortly after that. I'd recommend setting boundaries ...


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