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204

Don't confront them. Here's why: If they say they aren't going to lay you off, will you believe them? You shouldn't. So you are no closer to resolution or closure. If they say they are letting you go. Then what? If they are truly magnanimous, which is unlikely, they will give you time to figure things out. So what should you do? Go figure things out. ...


190

You can trust Parkinson's Law (work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion) to provide more work for you. You don't know what that work might be, but if your bosses see you as competent, capable and trust worthy, you have nothing to worry about. If you can automate the mundane stuff, that just frees you up to do more interesting things....


144

It's challenging to speculate about why particular decisions are made, even if you're able to observe directly - so, as a potential frame-challenge to your question, it's worth considering that you may not be correctly attributing a given decision to the right factors. But generally, there are lots of reasons why management might make these decisions: ...


130

What should I do to rehabilitate my reputation? First off, you should apologize to Bob. Without intending to, you misled him and falsely raised his hopes. Something like "Bob, I'm truly sorry. I thought I knew the list and was just trying to be reassuring. Turns out I didn't know the real list and I should have kept quiet. I know this was painful to you, ...


121

Damn, that's a really crappy situation for both you and "Steve" As I think you've already concluded warning him is not a smart move, as ruthless as it sounds you need to look out for yourself. Sure him having some notice and being able to prepare would help him out a bit since he could get a jump on the job hunt but that's not really worth potentially ...


111

It's more than perfectly reasonable, it's crucial, to ask for a much higher rate than you were receiving when you were employed because your previous employer will no longer have to pay costs and fees associated with having you as an employee. That cost will now go onto you. There are numerous articles and strategic videos out there on how to target your ...


96

You seem to be thinking of this from a very cold perspective. That's probably a good way to get into the "mind" of a corporation, but since the decision-makers are actual people they may not respond quite that way. For example, your point on morale suggests that morale would be higher with larger and more intense layoffs than with smaller, less aggressive ...


95

I think you should double down on effort AND interview for other roles. I was once put on a PIP, it was shocking at the time and I didn't totally agree with it but I realised it wasn't totally unfair. My solution was for the next three months I worked my butt off to improve and impressed the management enough I was able to hand in my notice on the same day ...


84

Another lesson I learned in life is that a company that will do that to a fellow employee will do that to you. Update your resume and be ready to move. This is an awful position to be in. Don't warn him "officially" as this will only bite you hard later, but if a few things start happening that are beyond your control like meetings being scheduled without ...


78

The company has no business being interested in what you do in your spare time. As long as you keep this outside of work hours, there isn't really much they can do to stop you. However in the interests of not appearing to be in open rebellion against the company you should probably keep this relatively discreet, by which I mean don't put up posters ...


76

Brexit hasn't killed your company. Your boss has killed the company by assuming that Brexit will kill your company. Working and living in the UK for a large technology firm, Brexit hasn't changed anything about how we work. The fact that your boss thinks it's a guillotine pedestal is simply a sign of his bad financial planning. Obviously, you don't have ...


69

This is not a decision you want to spend a long time contemplating: the longer you take to act the more suspicious it will look when you eventually come forward. I really see three options: 1. Honesty In this situation you are - somewhat - putting yourself at this company's mercy, and also counting on their generosity, which may be ... silly. You go to ...


67

Being fired is reserved for individual personnel issues: performance, behavior, etc. This would be targeted at a single individual. Being laid off is when the company is having financial issues and needs to remove costs. This is almost never just a single individual losing their job or the suspicion would be that it's actually a firing. Note that financial ...


64

I suppose, theoretically, a terribly short-sighted organization might potentially see a manager with little to do in this situation and consider laying that person off. But that would be exceptionally rare. And quite stupid. Companies are generally not in the business of laying off people with a proven record of being able to create successful self-...


61

Rarely if ever will an employer give a direct, honest & unwavering answer to this question. Either because they can't/don't want to show their hand, or because they honestly don't know. Or the answer they give today could change tomorrow. I have a former colleague who was told by a trusted source on one day that "no layoffs are coming." 2 days later, we ...


60

Setting aside the personal issues with knowing a coworker will soon be terminated (which may be troubling but really is none of your business), there is a bigger management problem here that needs to be addressed (and can coincidentally fix your dilemma as well). The Root Problem Based on the scenario you are describing, it seems clear there is ...


58

This is a very real phenomenon. The people who are laid off receive a shock, of course, and may be upset at first, but they go on to something new and hopefully exciting. You on the other hand still have the worry hanging over you, you miss your friends, you did not get new replacement friends, and in some cases you are also being asked to do more work (...


53

Cancelling is easy. You call the person who set up the interview (phone is better than email unless most of the interview arrangements were done by email) and say "Thanks very much for your invitation, but my circumstances have changed and I'm no longer interested in interviewing for this position right now". Don't worry, your recruiter has this happen all ...


50

What's your duty? Give it to them - if they want it. As a paid employee, you have a fiduciary duty to provide them with this code that belongs to them in the first place. You should not even begin to consider other alternatives. It's theirs. They pay you. Give it to them. If they ever find out you withheld it when you knew they wanted it, you could be in ...


46

First, talk to a lawyer. They are the only ones who can give you definite advice on this. My guess is that if you quit because you aren't being paid it can be treated as if you were laid off, but absolutely 100% talk to a lawyer before acting on this. Second, talk to the Employment Insurance people right away. There might be something they can do for you. ...


45

In addition to the other answers which contain many true things, these "old timers" often have soft contributions that are difficult to measure, but which are important. Some examples depend on the exact role they have worked in: They may have long-standing relationships with customers, which are useful intermittently and hard to replace They may have deep ...


44

Something that you wrote which is unaddressed by the other answers is this: My "slow performance" is true but due to micromanaging; constantly interrupting me and (unilaterally, overruling my protesting) moving goalposts. My "lack of understanding" (other aspect I was criticized for on the sheet) is due to manager aggressively probing angrily whether I ...


43

There are some lessons to learn from this. In these circumstances, never, ever tell someone their job is safe unless you officially know it is. You just experienced the downside of getting it wrong, and its very bad. Jackie and Sue should absolutely not have been sharing names from the list with you unless you were supposed to know it. The fact that they ...


41

What best I can do to make sure I am in a position that minimized my risk of layoff? Managers don't want to lay people off, but sometimes are directed from above to do so. Sometimes managers have leeway in whom they lay off, sometimes not. When they do have some leeway, you want to be in the best position you can be to avoid being high on their list. Here ...


37

It's never a nice feeling, but there are several things that you can do to prepare. These are what I have done when I knew a company was planning to let a lot of people go. Join a union. You do not know the labour laws in your country, they do. Find someone who can explain your rights in a situation like this. How much compensation are you entitled to? ...


36

A major benefit is something you mention in your question. If a company can tell prospective employee that it has never laid off an employee, that can make the candidate more likely to join the company or to accept less compensation in return for the perceived better stability. Of course, as you've discovered, that perceived stability may evaporate quickly ...


31

Are there pros and cons? Absolutely. You would much rather be laid off than fired. If you are fired you may have to explain the situation to future employers whereas if your were laid off it is self explanatory. The term "fired" means the company got rid of you due to performance reasons ( on an individual basis). "Laid off" means you were let go to ...


30

Before breaking the news to your superior, I'd make very sure first that you have a new job. This means I would only tell this if I already signed a contract with the other employer. If you make your plans known prematurely you might end up being fired at your current position, and no new job to follow it up. Once you have a new job, I'd discuss this asap ...


30

Basically, because not all business decisions are made with a ruthless eye on only the bottom line: some are made with a sense of compassion and humanity. If keeping the obsolete worker on roll would bankrupt the business, of course the old guy would generally be out of luck. But in human terms that desk and that salary may be worth a lot more to him than it ...


28

The company owns the code. Any attempts of selling them their own code will end in tears. When you are laid off, all employment contracts that I've had required me to destroy any copies of code, or generally any company documents, that I might have in my possession. And that's what you need to do. If you have been given notice, so you know you are going to ...


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