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6

You're not obligated to tell them you're being made redundant - and on the whole your instincts are correct, telling them you are being made redundant can hurt your negotiating position. The circumstances where you are better off telling them is where it would likely appear as if you were trying to cover up an otherwise negative trait (such as job-hopping ...


6

more recently, a special program (let's call it Phoenix) was started. IMO Phoenix means significant restructuring (externalizing a big fraction of the shared services and some layoffs). However, this program is accompanied by a great marketing effort (a big Intranet page describing in detail the steps, list of possible companies where some products and ...


4

when a misunderstanding in the business flow led to a bug in a product shared by both the X and other group companies and this was not fixed immediately, a X boss complained that "they are not sold yet" Soooo never, ever in your company no one ever made a mistake of ommiting some divisions or totaly forgetting they exist and let them knwo about some changes?...


4

There is one benefit to telling them you are being made redundant, the notice period may have just dropped to zero. If you normally have to give a notice period of weeks or months, being made redundant can remove the notice period. Leaving quickly can save the old company money. To the new employer being able to add you quickly can help them. They know ...


3

There are two answers for two very different scenarios. Agencies: Tell them straight. They are paid for getting people into the job, and just want to know about your situation with regards to availability. They will usually push for the best fit salary for your skillset because this keeps them sweet with both you and the prospective employer. Direct: ...


2

They can either be public about the restructuring process or they can be private about it. Twice in my career I have been an employee when a company split into two companies. The first time it was a surprise. Everybody got an email on Monday morning saying the company was splitting in 30 days. But several changes started that day. You couldn't jump from a ...


2

When restructures are expected to take a long time - such as a year or two - it can create a lot of instability in the business and make many people (who are otherwise safe) fear for what's going on and leave prematurely. In these cases, being open about the changes coming - so people feel that the changes are expected and know they will continue over a set ...


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