Hot answers tagged

203

Don't confront them. Here's why: If they say they aren't going to lay you off, will you believe them? You shouldn't. So you are no closer to resolution or closure. If they say they are letting you go. Then what? If they are truly magnanimous, which is unlikely, they will give you time to figure things out. So what should you do? Go figure things out. ...


143

It's challenging to speculate about why particular decisions are made, even if you're able to observe directly - so, as a potential frame-challenge to your question, it's worth considering that you may not be correctly attributing a given decision to the right factors. But generally, there are lots of reasons why management might make these decisions: ...


96

You seem to be thinking of this from a very cold perspective. That's probably a good way to get into the "mind" of a corporation, but since the decision-makers are actual people they may not respond quite that way. For example, your point on morale suggests that morale would be higher with larger and more intense layoffs than with smaller, less aggressive ...


95

I think you should double down on effort AND interview for other roles. I was once put on a PIP, it was shocking at the time and I didn't totally agree with it but I realised it wasn't totally unfair. My solution was for the next three months I worked my butt off to improve and impressed the management enough I was able to hand in my notice on the same day ...


45

In addition to the other answers which contain many true things, these "old timers" often have soft contributions that are difficult to measure, but which are important. Some examples depend on the exact role they have worked in: They may have long-standing relationships with customers, which are useful intermittently and hard to replace They may have deep ...


44

Something that you wrote which is unaddressed by the other answers is this: My "slow performance" is true but due to micromanaging; constantly interrupting me and (unilaterally, overruling my protesting) moving goalposts. My "lack of understanding" (other aspect I was criticized for on the sheet) is due to manager aggressively probing angrily whether I ...


30

Basically, because not all business decisions are made with a ruthless eye on only the bottom line: some are made with a sense of compassion and humanity. If keeping the obsolete worker on roll would bankrupt the business, of course the old guy would generally be out of luck. But in human terms that desk and that salary may be worth a lot more to him than it ...


26

Based on the details in the linked question, your division lead, "Chan", acted against his employer's interests in order to ensure his team continues to be paid for work that (based on the information available) is easily automated (how can a team of 200 developers be replaced with a script? Is the company that inefficient?). Also, your division lead sounds ...


26

My question - Should I expect the management to be completely honest about the burn rate and runway length? You should expect management to be exactly the same way they have been so far. If they have been completely honest and open about the burn rate so far, if they were completely honest and open about the upcoming redundancies, then you should expect ...


24

Sometimes it's just the decent thing to do. If a person has given a large portion of their professional life to the company, its not unreasonable to treat them well. When a 60 year old is laid off, do you believe it's easy to go find work? A company that believes in treating their people well is a good company to work for.


22

It's pretty normal to keep the hard and fast details of burn rate and runway from employees, especially if you're trying to turn it around and secure more funding. View yourself in the shoes of the startup founder. They've hit a tight spot maybe and need everything to go right to proceed. To have a viable pathway towards more funding and eventual success, ...


18

There are two different answers. The first is that "Jane" is likely to create a self-fulfilling prophecy by becoming ever more negative that she leaves, or is terminated, when there was absolutely nothing at all wrong with the business. I would tell her this immediately -- share with her whatever concerns, or lack thereof, that you may have. The second is ...


17

In many jurisdictions making someone redundant is somewhat hard - deliberately so - precisely to protect employees from unscrupulous employers. Some of the UK (your location) specific laws are summarised here In short, for a hypothetical 65 year old employee who has been employed by the company for 20 years, they will be legally entitled to: 12 weeks ...


17

I don’t have too many options here, but one is to confront them As @bruglesco already pointed out, there is no possible upside to this. Should I put in lots of time and effort at my current job? Or put in the bare minimum and start interviewing for other places? These two items are not contradictory. Put in your normal effort and start interviewing. ...


16

Is there something else they might mean? There's always going to be some guessing here - but I'd imagine from the context (not announcing it until later on) this is nothing to do with your exit from the company, but instead about the CEO's "exit strategy" for the business as a whole. It's a bizarre term, though. It could well be that he's working towards ...


15

One conception of a company is to provide for its employees. Americans often think of companies as having a singular goal: profit. But even then, profit for who? Sometimes companies focus on profits for employees rather than for a CEO or stock market investors. If the goal of a company of people is to provide for said people, of course you'd prefer ...


14

I worry that being made redundant twice in two years is going to look very bad on my CV Not exactly. First of all, usually you don't put the reason for shift in the CV, that just describes your experiences and capabilities. Secondly, if asked, you can mention the exact same thing you put in the question, preference to off-the-shelf solutions for ...


13

Continuity of institutional knowledge. It really matters when you have someone who understands every aspect of your business, and how all the pieces interact, and what's gonna move if you pull a string. Inexperienced people will blunder around and make a lot of costly mistakes, that the old guard could say "In '93 when we tried that, this is what happened." ...


12

Dear [former client] Thank you for reaching out to me. I enjoyed my time working with you at XYZ company. The layoffs at XYZ were a bit of a shock, but I expect that I will bounce back. It was unexpected, but that's the nature of layoffs. While this was not voluntary, it was also not performance related. There is no ill will between xyz an myself. It ...


12

Talk is cheap. I think she should be worried. The CEO probably wants your friend and others like her to work until he decides who goes and who stays. If people start to leave because they are likely to be laid off it might create problems for the company. If the CEO can make his life easier by being optimistic, why shouldn't he do that. If he had said "...


10

If you think you're going to be let go by your current employer, start looking for a new job now. Don't hand in your resignation until you've found an offer. You can't be certain you'll find something good within your notice period, and shouldn't risk being out of work entirely if you don't. Being laid off because your job function is being reorganized/...


9

Since the question has been answered already, I thought I'd focus on a different aspect of your question that drew my attention: There were two aspects that I was listed as underperforming in: (1) execution speed, which I feel is due to manager constantly moving goalposts (overruling my protestation)/ manager not being satisfied with any approach other ...


9

Companies with competent management typically don't do much laying-off of their workforce. Companies that don't have competent management typically aren't good at identifying their valuable employees. If a company is laying people off, and they don't know who the valuable employees are, there's not really any good way of knowing whether you'll be cut or not. ...


8

I would think that for future interviews it wouldn't matter which option you picked. Leaving before you're laid off The option of leaving early is completely understandable, why would someone want to stick around a company knowing they'll be let go, unless it was advantageous to them? The opportunity cost of not finding another job is something to ...


8

One thing I haven't seen mentioned in other answers, Karma. If you feel as though you may yourself reach this point later in your career, having a track record of getting rid of people near retirement age because they are no longer necessary may come back to haunt you. Fostering a culture where those near retirement age and have been with the company for a ...


8

Look at the potential costs vs the potential gains when you make your decision. You stand to gain: The satisfaction of taking retribution against someone who hurt your partner. The comfort of knowing you've done everything you could to expose this person's ethical bankruptcy. However you shouldn't rule out the risks and potential costs - she will ...


8

Before asking your manager anything I would suggest that you work on your resume and start applying to new companies. The situation at your company does not look good from what you have described and you need to be prepared for the worst case scenario. Also, asking your manager likely won't be helpful. If you are going to be laid of and he knows it, he ...


8

This won’t change until either you tell her, or she is laid off. Meet with her and talk to her. Tell her that her continuous moaning gets on everyone’s nerves, that she is wasting time instead of being productive, and that if she doesn’t stop, you will talk to your line manager to get rid of her because if her effect on the team. Then whenever she comes ...


8

An important consideration when thinking about Jane's attitude is that she has likely formed her current beliefs based on things that she has observed in her past. Layoffs are traumatizing. Even if you aren't laid off, it can be traumatic to see your peers or friends get laid off. For some people, this sort of trauma creates fear or anxiety. Anyone who has ...


8

You can't stop Automation. When automation occurs in general, its aimed at increasing productivity by removing easy and repetitive tasks and allowing an employee to focus on more important work. If its the case that these automation procedures are being targeted at making people redundant, I would go back and look at any team which are under performing or ...


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