300

I just went through this myself. Not everyone really wants advancement and the more responsibility and pressure that goes with it. It is great for such things to be available, but as long as they are still useful to the organization, and retained, some people are happy without it. In my case, when the new growth path was added, the first thing many team ...


283

As a developer these are things I hate: Requesting software/resources taking forever and needing loads of forms etc. Stupid requirements that are contradictory to other features or tecnically not possible due to existing functionality. Unreasonable and arbitrary/pulled out of thin air deadlines being set. Not knowing the priority of my work. So, if you ...


250

There is a certain amount of "getting your ducks in a row" that may be necessary when someone leaves employment very quickly. They may have been fired (despite someone saying X texted Y "I quit", you may have been deceived) or known they were about to be fired. If locks are being changed, something went down - I've had people give notice at my small firm, ...


201

Some people work to live. Others live to work. If she is happy and doing a good job why worry. She has different priorities in life.


159

As a speaker, I never want to be nitpicked or corrected. I can sometimes handle it when it's important and relevant for this audience. Usually, it isn't. Usually, I've decided to simplify things because I want to get a concept across, so it's not my lack of knowledge, it's a choice. And yes, I have been in the audience and cringed a little at things I have ...


150

From one of your comments: i want to work what i like to work and not what they want me to work You need to go and start your own company then. If you're working for somebody else, you're at work to do what your employer wants you to do, not to do what you want to do.


128

We all encounter this kind of conflict. The only thing you can do is DOCUMENT EVERYTHING There's nothing wrong with the boss being the boss until he tries to push his mistakes off on others. The most effective way to push back is to do the following. Document the flaws you see in his approach Document the consequences you foresee in taking his approach ...


109

If your goal is to help her develop professionally you should already be bringing this up with her. It sounds like you haven't. It is incredibly likely she will feel betrayed and view your inability to discuss this with her prior to leaving as a sign of your poor management skills. Particularly if you tell her, "oh those emails you write that are long? I ...


105

There are a bunch of moving parts to this question, so I'm going to respond with a quote, attributed to Howard Aiken: "Don't worry about people stealing your ideas. If your ideas are any good, you'll have to ram them down people's throats." Or, in this case, your ideas being given to someone else. Let's see: first, you talk about being a leader, and ...


91

I disagree with parts of the other anwers. Your message is unclear. Things like we need your help in this space to double-confirm that everything is ready are very vague. What are you asking/saying? Your colleague is now left to guess what you mean and will respond following his own interpretation of your text (that's what human beings do). You should be ...


90

First off, I want to say that there would be many people envious of your position. You mentioned you are a graduate, this situation can be typical of graduate programs. Sometimes placement within a specific team can happen quickly, and sometimes without even the blessing of the manager of a team. They may not even be prepared for you, or have work of a ...


78

You're the team lead, so you should be mentoring in this respect. Offer feedback, but do this away from the team so that you're not publically undermining your team members. Be supportive of what they do right, underplay what they do wrong (and address that separately). In the meetings, concentrate only on what's important and correct those points, but in ...


77

I can partially agree with most of the given answers. I do find the message unclear, but I don't think that that's the main issue here. Even if you had been clear on the tasks, it's the phrasing that is raising my eyebrow the most. What I immediately noticed is that you never asked anything, you only stated things. If I were to tersely rephrase your ...


76

Why do interviewers ask leadership questions even for “follower” positions? Because they suck at interviewing. You can dress it up as much as you want but the specific instances you describe are typical of novice interviewers who are just going through the motions or following a script. Now, that's not to say that it can't be useful to poll for this kind ...


68

In addition to the other good answers already here, I also think it may be useful to note that your attitude toward languages shows inexperience as a programmer. The core tools and structures of programming (and, more generally, software engineering) are largely language-independent, and most of the people that I know who are strong programmers are not ...


64

Is this a suitable skill to put on my resume? Should I list it as my most recent employment? How should I include this on my resume if so? This has given me many valuable leadership activities. You could put it in a section for "Leadership." I have played similar games, though not to the extent you have - the skills you learn coordinating dozens or hundreds ...


62

You do not have to be the best developer on the team to be the lead. It is important that you are technically competent to maintain respect, as you are in a hybrid role. Never lose sight that you are a developer too, as I would gather that it will remain at least 50% of your role. IMHO most good developers have no interest in being burdened with ...


57

A common mistake in engineering is that "the team lead has to be the best and if they're not I can haz they're burger". Sadly, the term is "team lead", not "best developer". Think of it like this - Abraham Lincoln lead the Civil War, but he was not a general, nor a great fighter. Steve Jobs led Apple, but he was not a great engineer. Leadership isn't ...


53

I am exactly in the same position as you, and my boss has asked me to become lead of my team precisely because I am new and don't have standing issues with anybody, I will probably be in a better position to defuse conflicts. I think about it as an opportunity to jump to a team leader position, which is something I wanted to do eventually. Also, this kind ...


53

Look at this from his point of view. He's a new member of a team. A few days before a project that he didn't work on is scheduled to be delivered, you send a message that this project's readiness is now his responsibility. And you send it publicly, without giving him any warning. What makes it worse is that the comment about "pressure coming from the ...


50

You are the technical lead. You have a subordinate that is not only stuck on a problem for a long time without delivering, but actively refuses to accept help. You need a one-to-one where you explain the problem, that she is not delivering anything, and that she was given help that would have solved the problem, but refused to accept it, and ask her what ...


46

In my opinion, you should do your best work until the last hour in your job, so the fact that you will leave in two weeks does not make (much) difference. That said, the main question should by: What do you want to accomplish? It does not look as if the behavior of the employee is causing concrete problems, so with respect to the goal of getting work done,...


43

So you are saying that you are underpaid but this is fine because you can help people and you enjoy that, but you could make more money elsewhere. And Ken either ignores this, or doesn’t even realise. I’d talk to Ken and make sure he understands that you are annoyed, and why you are annoyed, and that he might lose you over this sooner or later. Make sure ...


42

Wow, I think you already summed it really well. I'm not sure I could - on a big picture level - describe it better than you did in the question. So perhaps the strategy should be to go to specifics that your people can relate to. My examples are often things like (said to people on my teams): I have to keep track of all the work, not just the details of ...


41

A team of talented developers look to their dev manager not to be better than them at development, but to be a defender against drains on efficiency. Your administrative work will be critical. Director comes down asking for X coworker's time when that coworker is already 100% allocated to another project? Be there to talk to the director, explaining ...


36

First - you're not alone! I see this alot in folks that are only just starting in technical leadership, particularly when they are promoted from within an organization where they were excellent individual contributors. Some thoughts - I find this to be an oddly assorted collection, even in my own mind, so I never really have a perfect model... but here's ...


36

There is a huge difference between someone that focuses solely on flaws and someone who provides positive reinforcement along with constructive criticism. If the majority of what comes out of your mouth is "this is wrong because of XYZ" then you're likely doing it wrong. However, if reviewing a bit of code or a process design and you see something that ...


36

What's amazing is to see that despite your experience (at work and in life) and position, you still haven't realized that for some people, work and career weren't THAT important in life. Do you realize that many of us laugh at people focused only on their career, spending their time for their employer? The questions to ask shouldn't be focused on career, ...


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