200

Alphabetical order If you and the other members are on the same level (not able to make distinctions between "Team Leader", "Junior Dev", etc) Everyone will understand that the list is presented in alphabetical order and shouldn't arrive to any conclusion on who did what.


125

Admit your mistakes quickly Explain what you did wrong Explain what you will do to fix them Explain how you will make sure this will not happen again Don't make the same mistake again.


99

It sounds to me like you're coddling an underperforming employee. Anxiety and lack of self esteem are not reasons to allow an employee be unproductive and picky with their tasks. You aren't equipped or trained to treat self-esteem issues. Sit down with him, discuss what the road blocks are, and brainstorm ways to move forward. You should not allow him to ...


50

I have some experience with this from the other side. We did not have much pairing when rebuilding our Kubernetes infrastructure recently. The person who built most of the new infrastructure is now on parental leave every other week for the rest of the year. Every time they are gone we have to scramble to solve problems. This means we are losing development ...


38

If you are doing the presentation, and the higher ups don't already know you, then consider putting your name on the title slide. As for the rest of the team, if they are still around, take a team photo with everyone and insert that on the last slide of the presentation. You can then list their names from left to right, however they happen to arrange ...


38

"I know I'm failing him as a leader" I think you are doing really great according to your actions and go further than a lot of managers I've experienced in my last 20 years in the IT-industry. "..and what did you do to get things back on track?" We once had this issue with a long-term intern in our company working on minor tasks of our flagship-product....


36

How should a leader behave when he misses deadlines himself? Leaders need to be held accountable just like anyone else. If they missed a deadline they should: Admit to missing the deadline Apologize for missing the deadline Explain the reason(s) for missing the deadline Explain the steps that they will take to prevent this from happening in the future. ...


25

There's one thing that seems to be missing in the steps you said you did: Evaluate his skills, and based on that, what tasks he can do. If needed, if his skills include some that you're not proficient at, find other employees, senior ones whom you can trust, to evaluate his skill level. Based on that, estimate whether there is a place for him at all, or ...


24

Think carefully about what you want from team members and align interests and incentives As far as I can tell, most managers give very little consideration to this on a day to day basis and that lack of consideration can be seen frequently in questions on this site. Many things that managers hate are because they expect employees to make themselves worse off ...


21

All the other answers are great, but nobody gave what is in my opinion the most obvious answer: How do you expect your subordinates to react if they miss a deadline? Whatever your answer is, do that.


20

I think you are focusing to much on the term in a programming sense. By working with another, you can teach and learn from each other. For example, early in my IT career, I was a sales engineer for a software product. I was "paired" with a salesperson. We would travel to potential customers to sell them the product. He focused on selling and I focused ...


20

Have a talk with your own manager. Explain what you've learned about their technical problem. Explain what solution they're currently pursuing. Explain what solution you have in mind. Tell him that the impression you get is that they're not open to different solutions than they're currently pursuing. Now ask your manager how to proceed. His job as a ...


18

It seems you have wasted a lot of time wondering on "if"s and "but"s and did not take a stand on your decisions. In other words, they undermined your authority and decision, because you allowed them to do so and get away with it. I'm sorry, but at times, you need to take hard decisions to ensure that the protocols are followed and the work is delivered. ...


17

I think you need to involve HR (am I really saying that? :-) ) in a formal review process. A manipulator is at work here. A few serious red flags here (and not your fault at all). he'd tried to deliver the work package we'd agreed upon, but that he'd hit a dead end and was giving up. That's not his choice. You agreed a goal and he can't just opt out (...


14

First of all, make sure you are approaching them in a official capacity, not just as a colleague-met-next-to-watercooler person. Couple of steps, when you are working as an adviser for a team which is not directly being managed by your superior: Ensue your manager and the manager of other team is aware of your involvement. Document everything, all ...


13

My son has anxiety, among other things, and exhibits many of the same behaviors as your employee. I have some insights I think will help. His self esteem is largely because he isn't finishing things. When you let him not finish something, it reinforces that you also think he isn't capable. He is probably capable, he just needs a strategy for getting past ...


13

The best thing to do -imho-: don‘t make it a job interview. If your manager just has a slight idea what you are looking for, then he already asked a lot of question and thinks him to be a good fit from a technical point of view. Take the lunch exactly as the manager told you: find out if the new colleague is a good fit social wise. Talk with him about ...


12

I've done a lot of things to benefit myself that screwed my company because it made sense for me to do that. I am wondering if there is a way to structure things to prevent that now that I am in management and get to create my team from scratch. 1) Don't hire people out for themselves. I'm pretty unapologetic about weeding selfish people out of the ...


12

From my perspective, if I am doing great work in a leadership role, I should be given the leadership role formally. From your perspective, sure. From anyone else's perspective: NO. If you can't work nicely with others then you are almost certainly not suitable for a leadership position. You might be good at some aspects of the role but a surprisingly large ...


11

There are many different orders that you can consider for names on any kind of report: Order by contribution. Whoever contributed most (preferably using an objective measure) has their name first, and other names are applied in descending order. Alphabetical, typically by surname. Whoever's surname comes first alphabetically comes first in the list and it ...


11

There's two parts to this question. First part: "I am afraid of dealing with people smarter and more skilled than me!" Uh, no. Terrible way of looking at it. If you're a manager, your goal should be to hire as smart, as competent, and industrious of people as you can. If you don't do that? Oh, sure, you'll be smarter than your underlings... but your ...


10

Am I right to think the designer should be involved from the start - in the decision making stage? Yes, you are. Most development environments I have worked in to include the designers input in the beginning. Furthermore, their opinion carries considerable weight. The leadership does not see a problem in our process. How to make them see it? ...


10

Admit your mistake Admit your mistake. That's the most important part. Do not excuse it Do not explain it. Do not justify it. Do not give out reasons. There are exceptions to this rule. But for now, I won't go into them. 99% of the time, it's just better to not give out any. Do not promise that you won't do it again If you want people to trust you, ...


10

So we have slow team velocity, seemingly productive devs, but a project that is not moving forward. I can think of three options here: There is a pile of other work not accounted for on the task board. One of the many issues I have with Agile driven everything is that the board rarely captures much of the work being done. If you look at my project's board ...


9

You need to earn their trust and respect as individuals (or at least the trust of one or two of the more senior members of the team). You say that you're confident that their approach to the project is flawed. That doesn't matter as far as your short term goal is concerned. Instead, try to offer your help to deal with immediate problems they're facing. ...


9

I would ordinally say it wouldn't be an issue, but I can see where the problem may lie with contractors as they may be looking to get on your good side to get an extension. For me, as a permie (but also a team lead) I would use it to share around with everyone else after work as a Christmas celebration and thank the contractor by name for the gift. That ...


9

Usually, it's expected (and generally accepted) that gifts will flow down the hierarchy (superior to members). When it's the other way around - which is this case (a team member to a team lead), you need to be a little more careful. Check your company handbook, if you have one (i.e., applicable for you). In most of the cases, there's a cap (limit) imposed ...


9

How can I phrase this in a way that's professional AND doesn't hurt Joe's reputation too much AND doesn't make me sound conceited? I would suggest not to get into the meeting discussing your Root Cause Analysis of the problem (it seems that Joe really just doesn't have the skills at this point to lead the project). There can be any number of reasons for ...


8

Is pairing an effective strategy for non-programming related tasks? That's not your call. It's whatever management decides it is. They're the ones with theoretically the knowledge and specific experience to make the call. And yes, it is a reasonable way of spreading knowledge and pooling resources.


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