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Part of technical leadership, or really any leadership, is the politicking that goes along with it. It helps to have a higher level understanding of what's going on. You need buy in. You can tell them they're wrong, you can explain why they're wrong, but unless they agree they're wrong it doesn't matter. In their reality, you are interfering. In their ...


5

I think we all can agree on one point, a management experience worth "about a week" is not a viable experience in this context. Moreover, you could not handle the responsibilities and you had to let go of them to continue your existing work - all more signs of the fact that you're not yet prepared to handle those responsibilities. I'd say, refrain from ...


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Although I helped my colleague on many occasions, even with some tips how to be a contractor, I am bit puzzled with the situation. I am a team lead and if I accept this bottle is it ethical? Since you indicate that you are an independent contractor (i.e., you are self-employed), you don't need to worry about violating any employer's rules. Many ...


1

I'd say it's definitly not unethical since it's not a client or an outside contractor that presented the gift to you, so it couldn't be perceived as bribery but you could check your company policies regarding 'gifts' within the team, especially in regards to being gifted from subordinates. Since you state: All the team members are contractors as well ...


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Usually, it's expected (and generally accepted) that gifts will flow down the hierarchy (superior to members). When it's the other way around - which is this case (a team member to a team lead), you need to be a little more careful. Check your company handbook, if you have one (i.e., applicable for you). In most of the cases, there's a cap (limit) imposed ...


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I would ordinally say it wouldn't be an issue, but I can see where the problem may lie with contractors as they may be looking to get on your good side to get an extension. For me, as a permie (but also a team lead) I would use it to share around with everyone else after work as a Christmas celebration and thank the contractor by name for the gift. That ...


5

You need to earn their trust and respect as individuals (or at least the trust of one or two of the more senior members of the team). You say that you're confident that their approach to the project is flawed. That doesn't matter as far as your short term goal is concerned. Instead, try to offer your help to deal with immediate problems they're facing. ...


10

Have a talk with your own manager. Explain what you've learned about their technical problem. Explain what solution they're currently pursuing. Explain what solution you have in mind. Tell him that the impression you get is that they're not open to different solutions than they're currently pursuing. Now ask your manager how to proceed. His job as a ...


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First of all, make sure you are approaching them in a official capacity, not just as a colleague-met-next-to-watercooler person. Couple of steps, when you are working as an adviser for a team which is not directly being managed by your superior: Ensue your manager and the manager of other team is aware of your involvement. Document everything, all ...


4

A very effective communication would be “I have had enough of this. If you don’t trust me, find someone you trust and I’ll leave. It will cost you, but it’s what you want apparently. Or you shut up and let me get on with my job and trust me that I know what I’m doing. “ There is a good chance that the complaints will stop, one way or the other. As a ...


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Assuming he doesn't directly develop on your project, I'd try the trust route. Say something like: I understand that you are concerned for the success project. You repeatedly say that you need my technical knowledge to make this project a success. I know there are several ways to solve the technical challenges, please trust my judgements in finding a valid ...


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IMO, the behavior of your employer shows deeper problems that usually don't improve in a short time frame, and often not in the long term either. If he only has a minimal knowledge, without even understanding approaches well established over several decades (such as object-oriented programming), what to speak of more modern stuff, and yet thinks himself ...


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has stated outright nonsensical facts about newer languages/frameworks Some people are early adopters of new stuff. Other people are down-right aversive to any change. While not having the technical knowledge, he expects me to be able to do everything at light speed and is constantly disappointed/aggravated when something takes me longer than a day. ...


5

It looks like you have 3 issues: (1) Boss prefers an alternative tech stack To me, unless your boss has the budget and stomach to fund a complete replatform I'd argue that this is a moot point. I'm a LAMP man myself but the benefits of modern frameworks especially React when building modern UIs should be fairly clear. (2) Wasted time arguing about ...


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The company should replace the CEO. That can simply mean to hire a new CEO to replace him, if he is an employee CEO. Except he is an owner CEO, as common in small companies. It is often the case that the owner or founder of the company "naturally" became CEO when the company was founded. That makes it more complicated, but not fundamentally different. ...


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