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204

Is this normal? In my experience, this is not normal. What typically happens is your employer would work with you in the transition by supporting you with training. Or alternatively, you employer could allow you a bit more time to do tasks in this new technology to account for the learning curve. I will say however, as a developer myself, it is on me ...


153

From one of your comments: i want to work what i like to work and not what they want me to work You need to go and start your own company then. If you're working for somebody else, you're at work to do what your employer wants you to do, not to do what you want to do.


123

This new team member can be quoted as saying "It's not upon your employer to give you time to learn" and that we should all be doing this in our spare time at home. This new team member is confused. And unless this new team member is your boss, or is funding your paycheck, then this new team member can be safely ignored. If an employer wants you to ...


121

Whether it's condescending would depend on the individual person, situation and tone, but generally speaking I would consider this a long-term / teaching strategy. If they simply tell you the answer, then sure, you know the answer, but you may rely on them to give you the answer in future or not really internalise why the answer is the answer and thus ...


90

First off, I want to say that there would be many people envious of your position. You mentioned you are a graduate, this situation can be typical of graduate programs. Sometimes placement within a specific team can happen quickly, and sometimes without even the blessing of the manager of a team. They may not even be prepared for you, or have work of a ...


71

Give a man a fish... If you ask me what the current rate between JPY and USD is, I can tell you (about 95 JPY/USD). If you need to know the same thing again next week, or next month, and I'm not around, what will you do? It may be efficient in the short-term to just tell you to use 95, but long-term if an important part of your work is knowing what the JPY ...


68

In addition to the other good answers already here, I also think it may be useful to note that your attitude toward languages shows inexperience as a programmer. The core tools and structures of programming (and, more generally, software engineering) are largely language-independent, and most of the people that I know who are strong programmers are not ...


60

Don't worry about it. Different people have different backgrounds, different ways of analyzing and investigating problems. People have different experiences and one problem might be similar to a different one they've solved in the past. What can you do about it? Be happy that it got found, and see if you can learn from the other team member what thought ...


58

You can quit? The working world doesn't consist of choosing to do and not do things regardless of whatever your boss/business requires. There's... really not much more to it than that. You are paid to do things for your boss. Not paid to do whatever you want. If you find your interests don't match your companies, you can either: Work to get transferred ...


50

Good companies invest in their staff. Technology is a rapidly changing industry - there is always something new to learn. It is much cheaper to keep a current member of staff up to standard than to replace them with a new hire, which costs time and money in recruitment and getting up to speed. Good companies recognize this, and provide their staff with ...


46

Ask You really have nothing to lose. By asking you show that you are motivated to learn, ready to research where you can do so and by checking for group discounts you show that you are not doing it for purely egoistical reasons (which would be ok, too). If your boss declines your request, nothing bad happened. You can still do this privately. If you have ...


46

Welcome to my workday. Some issues are easy, some are tough, some you find immediately, others take weeks. I understand your stress as I suffer it as well. It's not fun to get up every daily and say yeah, I'm still on that bug, no progress.... You feel kinda stupid after 2-3 days. Here's my personal formula for getting over it. Keep notes. Write down your ...


36

First - you're not alone! I see this alot in folks that are only just starting in technical leadership, particularly when they are promoted from within an organization where they were excellent individual contributors. Some thoughts - I find this to be an oddly assorted collection, even in my own mind, so I never really have a perfect model... but here's ...


35

Unless you work for a company that only makes its own proprietary software, and therefore has complete control over their languages and tools (and has no wish to move on), learning unfamiliar technologies is part of the job. Saying no to it is not only impractical at your level of experience, it is also a significantly career limiting move, as when the ...


32

"Underperform[ing] because [you] didn't like [your] tasks" is the sign of a very poor employee, and, in my mind, you are rather lucky that you didn't get fired given that you repeatedly made changes where your new "features were breaking existing functionalities, or that [your] bug fixes weren't working". It seems like you are now aware of that, and are ...


29

This is an issue that you need to address. Feeling that there is something wrong when anyone but you solves a problem, or anyone but your turns out to be 'the best' in some particular circumstance is an emotional issue that is going to cause you problems in later life if you do not address it. Reacting like this is going to cause you problems, from ...


27

No, it's an actual teaching technique called the Socratic method and it is very effective because it is active learning as opposed to passive learning. Also, it gives the person insight to where you are having difficulties as it is drawing out your reasoning process. If you answer "well, I think that I should do 'XYZ'" and it's right, then they know the ...


26

.NET is not a language. This is a detail, but it quite strongly suggests that your programming skills are not as high as you may think. I think you have few choices: quit right away, accept the mission but look for a new job aggressively and quit as soon as you find a new job that aligns with your goals better, persuade the manager to give the task to ...


24

You need to buy into your organization's vision statement and core values to leverage your skillset and reap the benefits of synergy with your team members by achieving your goals and objectives. Once you fulfill these metrics you will achieve work life balance, meaningful work, fulfillment of corporate responsibilities, satisfied stakeholders, and nirvana. ...


22

Ask your question like you would ask it on Stack Overflow. Demonstrate all your research. Don't just say you googled it. Give the specific search phrase and explain what result you got and why it doesn't help you / why you don't understand it. Also, try other documentation before asking. Your teacher seems to suffer from a syndrome many experienced answerers ...


21

There's another aspect to this that jmac did not address: It's likely that your boss is busier than you are. If you do more research beforehand you maybe can avoid the questions and save him time. He will appreciate that. Also, extending your question with your research results (in your example: reasons pro and con for installing that program) may help you ...


21

I'm really not sure whether I'm supposed to pay this myself or ask the company to do it. Technically I can afford it but since this would greatly benefit the work I do shouldn't they support it in a way? EDIT: the only big downside I see in them paying for this is that I assume that they will want to make sure that I'm actually learning. I ...


20

Is it condescending? No, not at all I think you've already figured out this, and why they ask a question as an answer to your question: they expect you to understand the process, and hope that you will remember it so you don't have to ask about it again in the future. There is also a slight chance that they really are testing you (and not just an ...


19

No, it is not okay to expect that of your employees. You say: Assume a non-toxic environment. A manager saying "You better study over the weekend or you're fired first thing on Monday" is, unquestionably, a reason to pack your things and go. But how is that not exactly what is implied when you tell a junior walking in the door that you expect them to ...


19

As a rule of thumb, what you do in your free time is none of your employer's business. Their right to assign tasks is limited to work hours. They hired you for a specific position, presumably after interviewing you for that position, and the skill set that you had at that time. They have since then changed their mind and decided they want a different skill ...


18

I used to have similar thoughts and problems, frowned upon my colleagues for not respecting best methodologies and thought I was better than most (not saying you think this, but I did when I was junior), but as I eventually become more experienced, I understood I was missing a big part of the picture. I underperformed because I didn't like my tasks Well, ...


16

The goal of everyone learning to code is a noble one, but it's just not a good one for the vast majority of companies. Various companies have tried releasing tools which allow the "normal office person" to create their own solutions - which is why we have stuff like Visual Basic, macros in Office, etc etc. And those solutions are the bane of any software ...


13

There's a few questions in here, really :) Let me try to break them out and address each one: How do I avoid being defensive when people are critiquing my work? I don't have a great answer for this one; but some observations about cases when I feel defensive about my work: You've but days/hours/weeks/months into a project, and someone shoots most or all ...


13

Nothing wrong with asking questions unless they're such that it shows you have made little or no attempt to work out the answer for yourself first. Use whatever resources are available to you to do a bit of research on issues yourself before bugging someone else. They will notice and appreciate it. Question A (annoying) "I couldn't login, do you think it's ...


12

I have quit my job without a new one in order to change the mix of technologies I use. Although I don't have a job lined up, I believe I could find one using my current mix of skills fairly easily, so there is a reasonable similarity with your question (of course I want to find a new job with a different mix of skills). I have some time to go and so far ...


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