204

Is this normal? In my experience, this is not normal. What typically happens is your employer would work with you in the transition by supporting you with training. Or alternatively, you employer could allow you a bit more time to do tasks in this new technology to account for the learning curve. I will say however, as a developer myself, it is on me ...


153

From one of your comments: i want to work what i like to work and not what they want me to work You need to go and start your own company then. If you're working for somebody else, you're at work to do what your employer wants you to do, not to do what you want to do.


123

This new team member can be quoted as saying "It's not upon your employer to give you time to learn" and that we should all be doing this in our spare time at home. This new team member is confused. And unless this new team member is your boss, or is funding your paycheck, then this new team member can be safely ignored. If an employer wants you to ...


90

First off, I want to say that there would be many people envious of your position. You mentioned you are a graduate, this situation can be typical of graduate programs. Sometimes placement within a specific team can happen quickly, and sometimes without even the blessing of the manager of a team. They may not even be prepared for you, or have work of a ...


79

I lack the appropriate skills? or Is it a lack of guidance on the part of the company? Both. You lack the required skills for the assignment (not your fault, but it's true). You cannot certainly gain the knowledge overnight. You need to understand the scope and ask for required training to update yourself about the domain and technology. ...


68

In addition to the other good answers already here, I also think it may be useful to note that your attitude toward languages shows inexperience as a programmer. The core tools and structures of programming (and, more generally, software engineering) are largely language-independent, and most of the people that I know who are strong programmers are not ...


50

Good companies invest in their staff. Technology is a rapidly changing industry - there is always something new to learn. It is much cheaper to keep a current member of staff up to standard than to replace them with a new hire, which costs time and money in recruitment and getting up to speed. Good companies recognize this, and provide their staff with ...


46

Welcome to my workday. Some issues are easy, some are tough, some you find immediately, others take weeks. I understand your stress as I suffer it as well. It's not fun to get up every daily and say yeah, I'm still on that bug, no progress.... You feel kinda stupid after 2-3 days. Here's my personal formula for getting over it. Keep notes. Write down your ...


37

I see a number of red flags here. First of all, you're a recent graduate, which means, without much experience in software development. Second, you graduated in mechanical engineering, not software. And they give you as your first task, to recognize objects in a video stream? Seriously? That's like asking someone who went through a 6-month training in ...


35

Unless you work for a company that only makes its own proprietary software, and therefore has complete control over their languages and tools (and has no wish to move on), learning unfamiliar technologies is part of the job. Saying no to it is not only impractical at your level of experience, it is also a significantly career limiting move, as when the ...


32

"Underperform[ing] because [you] didn't like [your] tasks" is the sign of a very poor employee, and, in my mind, you are rather lucky that you didn't get fired given that you repeatedly made changes where your new "features were breaking existing functionalities, or that [your] bug fixes weren't working". It seems like you are now aware of that, and are ...


29

This is an issue that you need to address. Feeling that there is something wrong when anyone but you solves a problem, or anyone but your turns out to be 'the best' in some particular circumstance is an emotional issue that is going to cause you problems in later life if you do not address it. Reacting like this is going to cause you problems, from ...


20

The first thing you should do is ensure your boss has a realistic idea of your progress. Tell him "this is a lot harder than we thought", as soon as possible. Do not fall into the trap of waiting until the deadline finally arrives to admit that you're nowhere near finished. What you're trying to do is hard. It was impossible when many of us started work, ...


19

As a rule of thumb, what you do in your free time is none of your employer's business. Their right to assign tasks is limited to work hours. They hired you for a specific position, presumably after interviewing you for that position, and the skill set that you had at that time. They have since then changed their mind and decided they want a different skill ...


18

I used to have similar thoughts and problems, frowned upon my colleagues for not respecting best methodologies and thought I was better than most (not saying you think this, but I did when I was junior), but as I eventually become more experienced, I understood I was missing a big part of the picture. I underperformed because I didn't like my tasks Well, ...


12

I wouldn't lose any sleep over this, especially if no-one is questioning your ability. Quite often when debugging you can get so deep down one path that you lose perspective for other issues. This comes from being so focused on the investigation. Sometimes stepping back, or having someone else take a look, brings a new perspective and the bug is ...


11

TLDR: It may be appropriate to expect an employee to study a new technology outside of their 40 hour work week, but such expectations should be reflected in their compensation. I think the issue is more nuanced than the question you refer to might indicate, and the question contains confounding factors. It may also depend on local custom and labor law. In ...


10

TLDR: Expecting employees to do regular work (incl. self-training) in their spare-time is not okay. Expecting employees to do emergency tasks outside of work hours in a reasonable amount, taking the wishes of the employee into account, and compensating that with money/time off is okay as long as it's officially communicated early or not enforced (clearly ...


10

I already have a job (courtesy campus placements) and now I don't know what should I do with this month. First of all you should enjoy yourself. Travel, visit friends and family, relax - whatever you like to do. You'll be starting a job and may not have much time off for a while. Then, you can learn what you feel you'll be using on the job. This isn't ...


10

The thing is that I really didn't like it, I was also working on micro-features and I felt that I had coding-monkey tasks, so I made the horrible mistake of not giving importance to my tasks, also because I though that they weren't so important for the company This is indeed a horrible mistake. For your company these tasks might indeed be not that important,...


9

You should take it as a blessing in disguise. You are learning other technologies and tools that you wouldn't otherwise learn if you were "pigeoned holed" into one language or platform. It gets easier to learn new technologies the more you do it - they are more alike than you think and there are frameworks or methodologies that span across platforms and ...


9

Communication is the key - Talk to your manager It's clear that you are stuck with something and unable to make a progress. And that's a perfectly normal thing to happen. The first line of action that you can take is to speak about it to your manager/supervisor. Share what you have done so far. Seek his inputs. Don't hesitate in mentioning that you have ...


7

Broadly speaking, I feel like the responses to these sorts of questions don't consider the reality of the market. In short, being a developer is all about knowledge and experience and often knowing more means you can experience more which then reinforces what you know. It makes you extraordinarily valuable if you can do this. That said, consider your ...


7

Non disclosure agreement means that you won't tell outsiders about the project you've worked on and developed, for example the technical environment, how the code works and other details. You can learn whatever you want and add that to your resume and no one can prevent you, your resume means what you can do, so why would you want to hide that, make sure you ...


7

When I put it out to to the wider team someone has come in and spotted more context pretty quickly that then joins the dots and solves the problem. I find it difficult to deal with this emotionally because my ego tells me I should have solved it. It seems that your primary internalized reason for doing this is work is so you feel accomplished among ...


5

Free time is your time. Unless agreed otherwise, you're free to do whatever you want. Those are your legal rights, and your manager should respect them. That is, a manager that ... directs you to learn in your free time violates the law honestly advises that learning in your free time would advance your career is ok asks you to agree to learning on your ...


5

With more experience comes more wisdom. It's likely the other person has had a similar problem before. There's also the real issue of being "too close" to the problem. You've been staring at the same thing for so long, you can't even see the missing semi-colon, for example. I've worked on things for hours, only to realize I needed to replace the equals sign ...


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