Hot answers tagged

100

While I don't see any disadvantage for me to apply the leaves as suggested by him You are taking sick days when you are not actually sick. Maybe this is OK with and encouraged by your manager but what are the consequences of HR finding out? You need to read your employee handbook and find out if sick days at your company can only be used if you are ...


71

This is a type of unethical conduct or workplace dishonesty which happens in hierarchical environments where there is little accountability of the greater good and huge accountability from your imminent relations. What it could be about: As pointed by many: boss looking after his workers. He cares about the loyalty of his workers. Loyalty allows him to ...


52

The writing is on the wall. In Big Neon Letters: sorry, you have no future there. Your company is very nice and transparent about this. They treat you fairly and offer you a very generous deal. Take it and focus on the next adventure in your career. Edit: Just to elaborate, there are two things going on here Your company isn't doing well: They may recover ...


45

What will be the consequence of not returning or ghosting my employers while on leave? There's burning bridges and then there's napalming them to a crisp. The exact consequences are going to depend quite a lot on your location and perhaps most importantly what your contract says about things like giving notice. If you happen to be in a situation where you'...


32

What will be the consequence of not returning or ghosting my employers while on leave? Your reputation will be shot, and a bad reputation will follow you for years Most industries are very tight knit, and people tend to transfer between companies within the same industries, plus there are trade shows where people talk, et cetera. That is enough of an ...


30

Inform them if you want to. Or don't inform them if you would rather keep it private. Do whichever feels more comfortable. You have no obligation to notify your employer unless it impacts them directly. Personally I would make the decision in the same way that I would decide whether or not to tell any other friend, acquaintance, or stranger. I typically ...


20

It is not completely unusual for employees to view sick days as a commodity that are there to be "used up". This is an incorrect view of the world but just about common enough that it is likely your boss genuinely believes that you deserve the sick days as holiday. However... It would be very unusual for this to be an actual company policy and as such you ...


19

Just because this has not been mentioned yet, Assuming your company is larger, I have seen organisations where the budget for paid vacation comes directly from your team / manager's budget, but sickness comes from a central company medical expense budget. It could be that your manager is trying to manipulate such a system to have a little more money for the ...


15

While I don't see any disadvantage for me to apply the leaves as suggested by him, it is beyond my understanding whats in it for him? There should be nothing for him personally here. He seems to be trying to build goodwill with the employee (you) by getting more monetary benefits available to you (by having PTO's cashed / carried over) by working the system....


15

This is a horrible plan. If you want to leave, provide the proper notice, then leave. Do not just quit without providing any notice. It even looks worse if you take PTO and then not show up to work after. It is considered really bad form, unprofessional, and you can kiss any positive references from them goodbye as well.


12

The "definitive" answer: only time can tell. However, if I were you, I'd take this "hint" as a sign that there is not going to be too much positive possibilities. Start brushing up your resume and look for other opportunities. You had a good career there, now time to move on and find another (maybe better, who knows?) workplace.


12

Your boss is messing with your professional reputation I don't know if that is their intention, but it is certainly the end result. Taking sick leave straight after a planned holiday generally carries a negative connotation - it is not a good look. Your boss might think they're doing you a favour, but it could give other people in the company the impression ...


11

Is it typically acceptable to ask for a day off Yes, it's typically acceptable to ask. Be prepared for how you will choose to react if they are not typical and don't grant the day off. Then, consider if this extra work is likely to be a regular part of the job, and if that fits into your lifestyle or not.


11

Take the package. Even though you might not be greedy for money, you can always bank away the extra cash for incidents that might come up (illness, repairs) while in the meantime be paid (!) to do a job search. This company is looking out for your well-being, while admitting they may not last longer if you do stay. I admire companies with that kind of ...


10

While their method for calculating the effective accrual is.. well it's pretty shoddy. They are allowed to do it this way however - as long as you get your statutory entitlement, which in your case would be 22.7 days (since you started 70 days into a leave year) and they are giving you 27.5 so you are above the minimum. Given this is essentially a one-time ...


9

This is an excerpt taken from UK GOV Website (noticing the UK tag) The general notice period for taking leave is at least twice as long as the amount of leave a worker wants to take (for example 2 days’ notice for 1 day’s leave), unless the contract says something different. Unless your employment contract states otherwise (which it does - and is in fact ...


9

What you're describing is pretty much every job (if you omit the Maternity Leave part.) Seriously, the progression for pretty much every job is: Previous person doing the job leaves (they quit, they're fired, they're promoted, whatever.) New person is hired to do the job. New person is trained by someone else on how to do the job. New person does the job. ....


8

My question is, why would you ghost your employer while on leave and just not come back? Why not just return from leave, and on your first day just go to HR and be like "hey, I decided this job isn't for me, see ya later"? That would work way better and be way less unethical. It's a job, you can quit whenever you want (modulo e.g. 2 weeks notice and so on)...


7

So you want to test-ride a girlfriend / boyfriend abroad while your current partner is waiting for your decision after 3 months ?! Do you see how preposterous your proposition is? Neither parties will have incentive to get into this agreement, especially your current employer. You can't just try out a company and leave. You need to sign a contract (...


6

You have to be very careful. As I understand, you will have two contracts for two jobs at two different companies at the same time, for three months. With this situation: you can break at least one of the contracts / company regulations (very likely); you can break country laws regarding work and employment in at least one of the countries (also very ...


6

First of all, my condolences for you loss. As for informing your employer, that is up to you and how comfortable you are sharing personal information with them. I would not inform them to give them a "heads up" that your work an attitude may be affected. Instead, should your attitude and work start to deteriorate and they ask you what is wrong, I would ...


5

Should I still inform my employer of the loss, as it has a possibility of affecting my work or attitude? Or should I not bother providing any information since it is not work related (e.g. its just a personal problem and is not a concern for my employer since I will not be taking leave)? If you think there's a possibility that it might affect your ...


5

Welcome James, but you should probably address this to the StackExchange legal group. The answer depends on too many unknowns. Your best bet is to book an appointment with a local Citizens Advice Bureau and take all company paperwork with you, especially your contract of employment and any company policy documents (employee handbook etc). Your immediate ...


5

Sounds like your manager is trying to cut you a break. My old shop had sick days that you could roll over because we were union. But some places don't, so it sounds like hes trying to help you stretch your time. So long as HR doesn't complain, it looks like he's just being nice. I wouldn't worry too much, because sometimes you get someone who isn't just in ...


5

Honestly I'd guess there's a greater than average chance that what's happening here is not legitimate. I think you probably realise that it would take some extraordinary reason for it to be. Key seems to be this line why waste it when other types of leave are available Well, because the different types of leave are for different purposes. There's ...


4

Were any pay-cuts being done against your unpaid leaves when you were paid your salary after your leaves? Generally followed industry practise is to deduct against any unpaid leaves from the due salary in the next pay cycle. Legally speaking, you are bound by the original terms of job offer from the employer as stated in the offer letter and agreed by you, ...


4

When taking a couple months of unpaid sabbatical in the UK, the employer will usually drop all benefits until the employee is back. Quite certain this policy would cut the national health insurance payments too. What are the options to maintain cover by health insurance during the sabbatical ? Not asking about the private health insurance, but ...


4

To answer the question: Potential Consequences of ghosting or quitting immediately Sued for breach of contract (you mentioned a required 6 month notice) Not qualifying for unemployment benefits Loss of severance package Destruction of your professional reputation <-- Almost guaranteed, not just potential No chance at a good future reference, and some ...


3

The NHS is largely funded from taxes, including employment related taxes, but it is not an employment-related insurance system. It is a service, primarily for UK residents. There are complications such as fee-for-service for some services to visitors. Some visa types require a contribution to the NHS. The simplest case, and the one that seems to apply here,...


3

Express your desire to your manager - the case you made above is pretty convincing. Your manager almost certainly cares a lot about your development and happiness. If this is something you want to do, you should expect him/her to be supportive. In your conversation with your manager, be assertive and specific in your plans. Don’t ask for permission, tell ...


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