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-1

In short, because they can ask, because it has always been that way, and because everyone else does it. Originally, this was needed before the popularity of internet when official communications were sent via mail. This is so they can send interview schedules and offers. In modern times, no one needs it for an applicant. The reason that it is still there ...


5

My sickness allowance is not enough to survive With paid sick leave shorter than 6 weeks at 100% and extended paid sick leave around 70% salary indefinitely, that is exceptionally bad financial planning. Sorry to be blunt, but if you are so much in debt that you cannot survive on 70% of your salary you have a problem. And it's not your workplace. Your ...


2

Health is one of the most important thing human being can have and if doctor insists on doing something my advise would be to do everything within your possibilities to comply. Even if you'd have to leave this particular job. Don't you ever stick for any job if your health is at stake - it's just that easy. Of course there are some extreme exceptions (like ...


1

Should I listen to the doctor and recover fully? If you want to recover, of course. If you need more time to recover you could ask the doctor to provide you with some medical letter or form, where it specifies that you need X time off for recovery. Try asking for more sick leave, and explain your situation. You can show them the letter in case they are ...


0

Saying something negative, even when absolutely true and not misleading in any way, is disparaging. That's the meaning of disparagement, as opposed to libel, for example. Whether a contract that forbids disparagement is enforceable or not, that is another matter. At one place where I worked, there were layoffs, and some employee's access card stopped ...


2

I'm more interested to know if there are any established precedents as to the scope of non-disparagement clauses. Here are the precedents: https://www.littler.com/publication-press/press/non-disparagement-agreements-worth-it However, during these layoffs, a number of people found out that they had lost their jobs when they received administrative ...


0

If your position (finance? health care? security clearance?) requires a deep background check they probably will find this kind of legal record. But deep background checks cost money. They probably won't do one until they have decided to hire you. You can explain the situation if they raise the question: "My former landlord is trying to cheat me." Or, ...


0

old landlord to court No good company would be concerned about this. Taking legal action doesn't mean anything negative about you. When a company does a background check which can include a credit report, they are only concerned about judgements against you for a huge amount of money where you did something unethical.


5

Could it still be seen as a red flag that I had to get involved in the legal system? Of course it could be. It could be that someone would see this and conclude that you are a lawsuit-happy individual, and worry that you might come after their company. But that's exceedingly unlikely. First, they would have to somehow discover that you are "involved in ...


1

Could it still be seen as a red flag that I had to get involved in the legal system? The only raised eyebrows you might get is if your dispute somehow involves one of your former employers or if the outcome of the dispute could affect your ability to do your job (for example the possibility of losing your license for severe traffic violations for a delivery ...


12

Your legal dispute with the landlord is not unusual, and I do not think that an employer would look negatively on it. You initiated the lawsuit not vice versa. If you landlord was suing you, then it might raise red flags. Given that the information is public, any potential employer could get the information on the case through public record to see what ...


1

IANAL and the legality would most certainly depend on location but, I would be inclined to say that it's not against the law. It's certainly morally wrong, considering the company wouldn't allow him to directly employ his sister. None of this should be of any concern to you anymore. You've left the company now and should leave these things in the past to ...


3

You probably want a different site to truly answer the legality, but nepotism is generally frowned upon, but I don’t think illegal. How they went about it sounds more like loopholes and tricks than any real legal issues as well. As far as what to do, it’s a matter of your motivations—morality? vengeance?—and your risks. Burning bridges is rarely ...


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