Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
232

The whole point of LinkedIn is to allow users to share business, and in some cases personal, information about themselves. The converse is also true; allowing you to view business and professional information of a potential employer, customer, business partner or other business relationship. Honestly, as an employer, I'd be disappointed and surprised if you ...


220

No. Don't apologize. Had it happen to me, and I've done it myself. If a person doesn't want their profile accessed, they shouldn't make it publicly available. There is nothing wrong with that.


176

Regarding the first question, "is it legal?" questions should always be posted on Law SE, not here. As for your LinkedIn account, LinkedIn has the ability to change your email address associated with your account. It should be in your profile settings somewhere. You should change that.


146

Should my manager be aware of me being offered opportunities to other companies? The short answer to this is no. The longer answer is that once you make that statement, you have essentially said "I am not happy here for whatever reason, and I am looking." Once you have implied this, it is really hard to take it back. Your best approach is to keep this ...


133

How long is it appropriate to wait before sending him a message on LinkedIn? Whenever you feel like it. As you said, he probably left and burned some bridges; your thank you message will surely lift his mood, so maybe it is better if you write to him as soon as you can.


105

Update your linkedin profile IMMEDIATELY, report possible fraud to them. Change the email from your work email to a private one. Get a lawyer to send a cease and desist order to your previous employer. Ask your lawyer about identity theft and criminal impersonation charges. Also ask your lawyer if you're permitted to reach out to the clients.


99

I think you can just add them on LinkedIn without asking permission or talking about it face to face. Just build a network, you will never know when it will come in handy!


74

You work in the "Financial Services" industry, and your job title and skill set is "Software Developer". This will be important later in your career when you're applying for developer roles that want experience in the financial sector. It won't limit you to only working in software development roles that require financial knowledge however. The skills you'...


67

I'm assuming you are taking this agreement to a lawyer before signing, right? This is a business and employment contract, and this no-LinkedIn clause is a built-in provision which will allow them to sue you for money damages in perpetuity - that means that by the wording of the contract they can sue you on your deathbed if they claim you EVER re-activated ...


63

It depends on how you plan to use LinkedIn. Do you plan to use LinkedIn to keep track of past and present coworkers? (i.e. Keep track of their education history, job history, accomplishments, etc.) If 'Yes', then don't accept these LinkedIn invitations. On the other hand, if you plan to use LinkedIn to network and find new jobs, then you should accept ...


54

As an individual who is not involved in the recruitment or hiring practices, beyond participating in phone screens and interviews, I would see this as an unreasonable request. All of my profiles, including LinkedIn, are representative of me as an individual and not as an employee of my company. If I'm not using LinkedIn for my job, I don't necessarily want ...


54

If your date of volunteering was given as Nov-2016 then I would assume that you volunteered for the whole month. If I found out that you actually volunteered for one day only, I would assume that you were intentionally misleading me, that you were totally dishonest, and that you couldn't be trusted. That would greatly reduce your chances of being hired. If ...


51

Company owns your email address (for example natasha.nice@yourcompany.com ) so they could theoretically re-use it, however impersonating someone (especially to obtain financial gain) is strictly forbidden in most civilized societies. For example , in US it amounts to a criminal fraud. I advise you to write polite but firm letter to your former company, ...


50

I also receive quite a bit of requests from recruiters on LinkedIn and like you, they ask me to reply if interest or forward to others. Those recruiters are taking the easy road by blasting requests to many LinkedIn users without qualifying first. This is not much better than spam. Since you are not looking for another position at the moment, I would ...


48

Send back an objection. Let your employer know that your LinkedIn account is NOT a company LinkedIn account, that it's your personal LinkedIn account, and that you are using your personal LinkedIn account as a vital tool in your job search. Offer, as a reasonable way to resolve the issue, to have him review the content of your LinkedIn account for anything ...


48

I was wondering if it would be appropriate for me to ask my co-workers if I could maintain a professional network with them It's perfectly appropriate to invite anyone who you think would add value to your network. Depending on how you worked with them during your internship, and how they feel about you, they may not all accept your invitation. Don't ...


45

LinkedIn actually has a form you can fill out to report that a profile has been left behind by a deceased colleague. This will allow LinkedIn customer service to remove the profile themselves rather than have his son happen upon the profile himself 5-10 years down the road when it thoughtlessly suggests his dead father under "people you may know". ...


44

You need to be aware that LinkedIn recruiters contact a very large amount of profiles. They are fishing with a large net to hope catching one fish. So telling your manager that you are very solicited isn't much of a threat. There is no such thing as keeping a kind of implicit pressure on managers for them to keep workers happy before they start to be ...


43

If I were one of the interviewers, I would view it as good research and a positive indicator about your interest in the job. I would however stay away from asking any questions about info you found out on LinkedIn that is not directly relevant to the job you are interviewing for unless they volunteer the information. The fact that you went to the same ...


42

Should I rephrase the question? Also, I have a doubt: is it appropriate for me to ask her for a referral, given that we don't know each other (neither personally, nor professionally)? It's perfectly appropriate and reasonable to ask for a referral from someone who read your writings, liked them, and asked to connect with you on LinkedIn. And your ...


40

I have a bit more of a broad answer. Never go to any meeting without knowing what the purpose of the meeting is, and what each participant wants out of it. * * Exceptions exist for spouses and bosses It follows that you should never attend a meeting unless it aligns with your interest. If you are prepared to go for a vague chat about things, it signals ...


39

Many of the reporters I follow on Twitter are very good at figuring out the secret plans of large tech companies by seeing what their employees describe as their duties on LinkedIn. Really. (They also do quite well perusing the Experience Required sections of those companies job ads.) If you say you're building a distributed whotsit system with integrated ...


38

I call these "fishing expeditions" by recruiters. They may or may not have an actual job, but with this kind of wording I tend to think there is no job and they are fishing for candidates - that is, people that they can sell to clients once jobs come up. It is a way for recruiters to have a pool of people to search for - the more the better as far as they ...


38

"Don't update your profile" This requested delay, in my opinion, matters little. Your director likely does not want clients to see a current team member leaving the company, and ask questions ("why would somebody leave the company I'm paying? Is there a problem?"). A possible "fear" is that those clients to which you're connected would ask why you left, but ...


36

Yes, it is ok to ignore them because they most certainly are spamming you. They are not your buddies. They are not your family. They are looking for product to resell to their customers. That product is you. Any recruiter in the business more than an hour and a half has a pretty thick skin, and will not be crying himself to sleep every night because, "...


33

I am wondering where I should list the three years of PhD on my LinkedIn profile Chose Option 3 The third bullet you provided is the way to go, put it in both locations. It looks like, and is work experience while at the same time you were able to obtain your PhD. That is a fortunate set of circumstances you found yourself in, being able to accomplish ...


32

Putting a photo on your profile does a few things: It distinguishes you from other profiles that only have a generic image People who look at your profile will relate to you better, as the profile now has a face When meeting face to face, people may recognize you from your photo It shows that you are who you claim you are People who do know you are more ...


31

In my opinion, it's not just accepted practice, but best practice. Whenever I've noticed candidates poking my Linkedin profile, I was actually positively impressed, as it shows preparation and insight. What is not cool, is asking for a connection to your interviewer before an interview. Don't do that.


29

I receive many "cold-contacts" from recruiters on LinkedIn. I always politely respond, and usually agree to add them to my network. I don't think you should attempt to deter them from contacting you, and here's my reasoning: I've had cold contacts turn into great jobs! My previous job was a cold contact from a company's recruiter, and even though I'm no ...


29

Yes. Just mention him you saw a Linkedin account using his name, picture, role and stating he attended that University, and ask if maybe it is his. If somebody is trying social engineering methods to gain access to reserved information, it is worth taking action before it's too late.


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