125

Your friend is just wrong. Obviously companies hire from other parts of the country, otherwise everyone would be stuck in one city for the rest of their lives. Is it helpful to live in the same area as the companies you are applying to? Yes, of course, but it is by no means a hindrance. Especially in today's perpetually-connected world with recruiters from ...


30

There are things to consider, but that isn't really one of them. Your first position as a programmer need not be career-defining, but it is influential, and it will start a rut that can be hard to break out of later. Location... isn't really a big deal. There are lots of ways to get a position that have nothing to do with the specific people you know. ...


25

It's reasonable to try, most things are. However, to follow up on what @Angelo touched on in his comment, the money is not the only concern. For most companies, I don't think it's even going to be the biggest one. I've seen this in practice a couple of times, where people would do weekly commutes from out of town (train and/or air) and it was always ...


25

Scrap the addresses for good as it's only noise. I wouldn't even use a URL unless it points to some very fancy stuff related to your project. Even then, that probably belongs in a different section.


22

As others say - don't get into specifics, if your concern is street and number, skip it - keep it to the city. If your concern is that they were in a certain city or town and have since moved - I recommend keeping the location you worked in. Resume items are most useful as a way to reference your job history - the majority of readers of your resume are ...


17

There's the "myth of HR" and then there's reality. The myth is what you read in the employee manual and are told repeatedly during orientation. It's that they're there to help you, "open door policy" and as always, "where to go when you have a problem with your boss". The reality, based on decades of experience, is usually much different. You need to ...


15

I would give him the courtesy of a telephone call informing him that you are handing your letter of resignation in and then ask him if he would like a hard copy or via email. If he would like a hard copy, simply ask him where he would like it sent. Most companies will consider the clock to be starting from when you have this discussion (and ensure you date ...


15

You can't. The company can move wherever it wants. Period. You can try to convince them it will hurt morale. You can try to convince them that it will increase turnover. You can even threaten to quit either individually or collectively. Ultimately, the company will do what it chooses to do.


14

You ask if there are serious issues as to why it might not work and I'm going to tackle that (I might point out that I did travel for my job over 50% of the time for 9 years and know what a toll it takes on your life): Flying in every week means basically giving up weekends. You need to fly out on Sunday night to be there for Monday morning and fly home ...


13

Have a following text at hand: Thank you for reaching out. I would gladly receive an offer concerning an assignment in Galway as I'm not interested in commuting above X minutes a day and relocation is currently not an option for me. Copy-paste it in the answer to the recruiter. Or ignore the offer. Let's face it - you've became (semi)automatically ...


13

Your friend is wrong. I work in a company in Southern California and we hired somebody from Michigan. I have grown up in Southern California, worked in Silicon Valley, then worked in Connecticut. I then moved back to Southern California, without any issues. You always have the option to move to CA after working in Detroit, then look for a job (or if ...


13

Your friend just doesn't want to see you go :) Because he's wrong on both counts. First, you won't have any trouble going to California later, unless you develop an addiction to Coney Islands or Buddy's pizza. Social connections tend to be by social media anyway, and I must admit by your language I assume you are not already in CA or MI. Second, ...


12

In the past I have seen this can rely on the intentions of the employer. For example, if they know you are good and want you badly but at the same time know you are not able to move and work at their location, they will most likely offer you the salary that is in the scale of the other employee's. On the other hand, if they want you just because you are ...


12

I've been getting a lot of headhunters trying to offer me jobs in other parts of the country or even outside Ireland. This may be partly because you've changed your profile recently. A lot of recruiters seem to search for newly updated profiles, and even a small change can cause your profile to be included in their list. It may be partly due to your ...


11

Out there in India, most important clients sit on the other side of the earth - namely US. So this is extreme example of Cross continent, worse timezone differences, critical project communication reporting and relationship management. Here are a few things most IT companies here in India follows. There is at least 1 guy from India office tend to shift ...


11

The sooner you ask the better. It sounds like you are already at the offer stage, so it might be a little late. It is going to depend entirely on the company itself. Here are a couple of ways the company might see this issue: They hire for the team. It's possible the company has considered you to be a good fit for a specific team, and there would be ...


10

How to reply the interviewer email to possibly change the venue to GSC office at sabah instead? Just be honest and ask. Most reasonable people will be able to accommodate the first interview. The real question you need to address is where will the actual job be based out of? Again, be honest regarding the hardship the distance introduces for the ...


10

First, don’t do this by email. It should be done by phone so there is no delay or chance it won’t go through. And it’s a more mature way to deliver bad news. (If they have only corresponded with you by email, then an email response s is fine. But if you have a phone contact, you should use it.) Simply explain that you have decided that you’re not going to ...


8

I don't think "order" is the correct terminology here. I'd say, they will "require" you to go and work at a client site, for which they can place a formal requirement. However, you can still open up a conversation and express your concerns / disagreement about the proposal, there's nothing stopping you from that. Given that you are a full-time employee and ...


8

Is there a way to find this out before I accept the job offer? I'd seriously reconsider if I knew for sure that they wouldn't allow it, but I don't want to risk the whole offer by asking them outright. If something is important to you, you simply need to ask about it. Something like "My partner and I have a dream of living overseas for a few years. Is ...


7

Mike's answer is already a very good one: call first and ask the manager how he would like you to proceed. Depending on your place of work and your relationship with both your manager and your current employer, you may want to cover all bases to ensure that your resignation really arrives and to be able to prove it. Email is often acceptable (it is "in ...


7

Does my geographic locations really matters in my career growth I don't think it matters directly. I.e. I can't imagine any recruiter paying attention to which city you got your experience with technology X in. Your choice has indirect consequences though. In big cities with busy IT life, you obviously have more work opportunities to choose from in the long ...


6

If your company already has an office in NYC, can you look to the people responsible for hiring there to give you hard data on the number and quality of applicants for the positions you have already filled there? While there are other factors involved (Are the roles currently there significantly different? Were the postings placed in similar locations and ...


6

Yes, location absolutely matters to career growth. Here are some quotes from Paul Graham's essay "Cities and Ambition": Great cities attract ambitious people. You can sense it when you walk around one. In a hundred subtle ways, the city sends you a message: you could do more; you should try harder. ... How much does it matter what message a ...


6

Yes location matters. If you work in a location that has 100 positions in your field (from entry level to senior level) that location will provide more opportunities for growth than a place that has 20 positions. And a location with 250 positions is going to have more opportunities for growth than your 100 position location. Also if you stand out in a ...


6

Imagine the weather (which is perhaps less complicated than people, but still quite complicated). Where I live, generally January is a cold month. It's perfectly fair to generalize and say that January is often cold. But that doesn't help me when I want to know the weather tomorrow. A few weeks ago the temperature dropped nearly 40 degrees over a 24 hour ...


6

Since you're working for a large, global company, what we have here is likely a failure to communicate. Or a misunderstanding. Don't escalate to HR right away without a clear understanding of the facts. What you need is an answer and an explanation, and it seems that your manager would be the best person to contact for those. You need to have an honest and ...


6

If you want to move, don’t use your current location on your LinkedIn profile. Use your desired location instead. And don’t put your address on your resume. Recruiters Restrict Their LinkedIn Searches by Area This means when their recruiters go to LinkedIn to look for candidates, they restrict their searches by zip code. Thus, if your profile isn’t coded ...


6

At least here in Germany "unsolicited" applications are quite normal (Initiativbewerbung). In your case it´s not even that unsolicited at all, because you have the skill-set they are currently looking for. Go ahead and apply - it can not hurt you (other than the time involved). Companies are always happy to be offered talent, and even if they can not offer ...


6

I'm a programmer in the south east and receive unsolicited contact from recruiters from California (general San Fransico) as well as other parts of the country at least once a week. You'll always have the opportunity to move to California (or probably anywhere else you'd like to live). Take the job you're most excited about. If you're more excited about ...


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