450

First, there do in fact exist managers who will not fire you just because they think you might want to leave the company, and who will not withhold plum assignments or otherwise mistreat you either. I am such a manager, for example. When I had people who were growing faster than I could help, I didn't blame them for wanting something I couldn't give them. ...


412

You absolutely have the right to have that bumper sticker on your car1. Your employer also has the right to fire you for keeping it there. I'd suggest removing the sticker. Feel free to ignore this advice if you prefer being an uncompromising boor over being employed. As for freedom of speech, consider reading up on what those laws actually mean. ...


397

The other answers are decent, but to me they seem like unnecessary escalation. If you go along with this, then yes, you need to cover yourself legally. However, have you tried the simple approach? He says it will negatively affect how the app looks. Ask him to open up his iPhone, and navigate to "Settings" -> "General" -> "About" -> "Legal" and see how ...


387

Your manager's job is to manage you. You want to tell your manager that you will leave if he tries. This is going to be an adversarial discussion no matter what. If you want to get the point across without giving him an ultimatum, first you need to understand his reasoning, and then you need to gently explain yours. Whatever he says, respect his authority as ...


372

Alert HR as soon as possible. This person is going to be disruptive as long as this person is allowed to be. In fact, give this person a taste of their own medicine and tell HR that a hostile work environment is being created by a person being offended on behalf of other staff who have expressed no such discomfort. I would be considered a member of ...


362

My question is: how to address underperformance and mistakes with an employee who's a poor performer anyway but it is at "breaking point" due to religious fasting? Don't treat it as a fasting problem, just as any other performance issue. Charlie is using it as an excuse. I fast regularly, it does not impact on my work performance because I don't let it.


346

They searched my office computer No, they didn't. They searched the government's computer which you are allowed to use in course of your employment. printed out some of my emails No, they didn't. They printed out some of the government's emails which you wrote in the course of your employment. Are they allowed to break into employe[e]'s office emails ...


308

In my opinion, your biggest problem is not Charlie or his fasting, it's this: we are short staffed anyway and typically working in "overclocked" mode to meet deadlines. We are a team of 3 including me as the team leader / line manager but should really be more like 5 It seems that you haven't considered that operating in perpetual crisis mode could be ...


307

So here's the part that seems sketchy to me: You've asked your employee, John, to do unpaid overtime work on the weekend. The reason it's "work" is because learning Angular is not something John would like to do in his free time, hence why he hasn't done it already (and continues to not do it), and it provides no value to John personally except inasmuch as ...


298

I just went through this myself. Not everyone really wants advancement and the more responsibility and pressure that goes with it. It is great for such things to be available, but as long as they are still useful to the organization, and retained, some people are happy without it. In my case, when the new growth path was added, the first thing many team ...


295

Sounds like your boss has a problem. To my surprise, where I thought I had posted my new phone number (a place where ALL employees could share their new updated contact number) was ACTUALLY where only where the branch supervisors put their phone numbers. I'd have responded to this with a casual apology. "Sorry boss, I had no idea that was only for branch ...


290

Find the root cause, you are compelled to do that TL;DR These are warning signals. An under-performing employee, that does not want to sit close to their colleagues, and does not even dare talk about it with you? This may be a case of workplace harassment. You are most likely compelled to act on that... legally, contractually and morally, in order to ...


276

The short answer: "Because I do not supervise them." If they don't report to you, you don't control their work or assignments, and shouldn't have to stay late due to whatever is going on, whether too much work or too little skill. If you are working 60+ hours a week and it still isn't "enough" - then you're at the wrong company. Neither you nor anyone ...


268

Whether or not the company shuts down is not your problem. It's not your company. Focus purely on what is best for you. If you're not getting basic rights and pay, then you should have been job hunting for a while already.


261

When threatened with dismissal, the first step is to consult a lawyer. After you did this, follow the advice given. Most likely it will include talking to your seniors about the fact that they gave you an impossible task. Either way, start looking for a new job. A company that you need a lawyer to not get fired is not a company you want to work at.


254

I think you're asking the wrong question. I'm going to go ahead and say that challenge was probably designed for you to fail it: You've been given a really impromptu test, which is kind of weird outside of an interview setting. I've never heard of it happening like that before. If my manager suddenly did that, I'd stare blankly at him and ask what the heck ...


253

Honesty is the only policy here. "I saw this file and realized it was something I should not have access to and deleted it". There is very little that you can do to insulate yourself from it at this point unfortunately. Good luck.


246

Respond with an email laying out all the things you tried, up unto calling the supervisor and leaving the problem with them. If there's some kind of "how-to-fix" checklist, read over it and check if you've done all the steps. Then close with an honest question about what more he would have liked you to do. This will either with your boss realizing you did ...


246

Why hide it? Yes, your boss was intoxicated, but you don't want to have issues because you didn't mention something you full well knew and they then find out later. Just make sure to explain exactly what happened to the new manager. If I was informed the previous boss, who was sent on sick leave, had told someone, while in an intoxicated state, that they ...


241

From what you describe, it is very possible that this is legally fraud. As such you need to do two things. First and most critical, consult a lawyer. People who knowingly commit fraud can end up in jail. I know this because I saw several people go to jail when I worked for an auditing agency. You, first and foremost, need to protect yourself. Next, fraud ...


241

I would focus on her productivity, not her individual actions. If her productivity is reasonable, then let it go. It's her process of getting more done at other times. If her productivity is low, whether you think it is a result of her chatting or not, address that directly. Have a talk with her about her lower than expected productivity, what is holding ...


236

You might want to take some arguments from the book The Mythical Man-Month by Frederick Brooks. Although it was originally written back in 1975 (overhauled in 1995), it is still one of the most important works regarding management of software development teams. It is most known for codifying Brooks's Law: adding human resources to a late software project ...


233

I would report it. Don't hide your identity, there is no point. If your company asks Slack, Slack can probably tell them who accessed that file. It's all in the logs anyway. It's just a matter of someone reading through them. Personally, I don't even understand your need for hiding your identity. You did nothing wrong. In any case, better you be the one ...


229

Am I doing anything wrong? Yes. You are working 66-hour weeks and taking part in a culture that promotes even longer hours. You are considering going even further into dogmatic presenteeism in which it is a good thing to be in the office even if there is nothing to do. You will not improve morale by staying late twiddling your thumbs. You will not improve ...


226

There are a number of issues that you mention in your question. I think for some of these there are things that you need to look at yourself rather than blame the manager. Let's address them one at a time: ...it's reached a point where I'm no longer willing to keep inconveniencing myself if there isn't an answer to 'What is the actual benefit to the ...


226

No, you should not. A bonus is for past work. You've done that work, and you've earned the bonus. And think of it this way, would you have felt guilty if you left six months after getting a bonus? Three months? A month? Two weeks? A week? Would there ever be a day you felt guilty if you resigned that day, but not if you resigned the day after?


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