5

I think we all can agree on one point, a management experience worth "about a week" is not a viable experience in this context. Moreover, you could not handle the responsibilities and you had to let go of them to continue your existing work - all more signs of the fact that you're not yet prepared to handle those responsibilities. I'd say, refrain from ...


3

You seem to be focusing this on getting your boss to trust your technical judgement enough that she will defend you from, er, "failures of logical thinking" elsewhere in the company. Success in that may be great for the two of you. But for the company overall, it would be much better if you and your boss can, instead of stonewalling the rest of the company ...


2

Who Knows? +1 to @thonnor's suggestion of allowing a POC, and @stefan's observation that past experience is not always a predictor of future performance. I would try to approach the problem a bit more econometrically, like so: If you had no other projects to work on, then you should let your team try The New Thing. Obviously, part of the problem is that ...


1

Is this professional? Expressing concern for ongoing projects, if supported by valid reasoning, is always professional. However it would be seen as very unprofessional to do it through a backchannel. In clear, you should speak with the shareholder AND the current team you have problems with openly. Speaking with your shareholder friend would bring a ...


1

Express your concerns with your current manager. Leave your old manager out of this. You wouldn't contact your past managers under similar circumstances and you wouldn't go straight to the company's shareholders either, so keep it professional and don't try to skip the important steps to have your concerns addressed. There are a few reasons for this. The ...


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