69

No. 1) You cannot delete the whole folder, as it contains some appropriate files. 2) How do you know what's appropriate and what's not? You'd have to go through all of his files. It's not your job and actually worse IMO. Additionally, you can't be sure if you've removed all of it, you could be hiding the issue. Bring it up to him privately instead You'...


45

People aren’t logging out for the sake of it. Have you considered that it might be causing real problems? I’m a software developer. You send me a message and make me deal with a 2 minute issue immediately, you cost me 15-20 minutes of focus on my actual work. Now, I am fairly junior, so few people are bugging me. But the more senior guys have to quiet it/...


44

You (and your manager) seem to be in urgent need for a proper management process. What you must do do avoid just the scenario you mentioned: Have a proper work plan. Estimate the work before you actually start working on them. Have a pre-decided acceptance criteria for each and every assignment. Have scheduled review meetings. Use a project management tool ...


26

we have to work 6 days a week and ... stay late on top of that We know from experience that this can end in two ways: the work schedule returns to "normal values"; the employee leaves. I know from my workplaces in 19 years. Also, the Internet is full of similar statements. In a comment you said: the manager thinks it's all a waste of time. Now we just ...


20

As much of your statement and comments are indicating, this seems an oversight. I could dream up scenarios where the boss wants to assert his authority and show that he can put whatever he wants out there, but I highly, highly doubt it. There's also the point that while he'd probably be quite glad if it were removed for him, you are messing with "his stuff"...


15

How should I address the issue and communicate to the boss that I do not appreciate such labeling? Since you have a generic question, I'll provide a generic answer: If you do not like something, speak up. No one is going to read your mind. There's no way you can keep everyone (including you) happy. If you don't want to be called X, just have a private chat ...


11

This is office politics, stay away from it. Clearly something is going on and you don't know what it is. It doesn't sound like there is anything to get for you by escalating it - especially as a contractor. Write your concerns to the PM to cover yourself against later blaming, but leave it at that. The CTO I'm assuming that the information actually made ...


9

I am also considering leaving the company because of this reason Excellent answers already, I upvoted all three. But I don't use any of these strategies, I let others pop their heads up for the group efforts and will watch in interest if they get their heads chopped off or quite happily take any benefits gratefully. There is another angle. Unfairness to ...


9

If the goal here is to get rehired - do nothing. You would be wasting your time. You weren't employed there long enough and weren't dismissed for an "automatically unfair" reason so you cannot challenge the dismissal. It sucks, I get that - but there's simply no legal basis to challenge this on and you've already been through their internal processes (twice)...


7

That's a tricky situation to deal with. I think the easiest way out of this (for now) would be to move Alive out of Bob's team back to yours or a place that's more compatible with her style & values. Maybe there is a swap that can be orchestrated. In the long term, there needs to be a way to address the mismatch between Bob and you/Alice. You need ...


7

You can have a whole discussion about how to talk to management to get nicer assignments. However, your first responsibility is to protect yourself. Your colleague is going to get into trouble He gets paid to work and he's not working. And he's sulking instead of speaking up, which is going to create an unpleasant surprise for a supervisor/manager at some ...


6

They are most likely trying to get more people to the office by following a policy of "let's not drive away old timers by taking away their remote time but let's also not allow people who normally work at the office to start going remote" It's not about fairness, it's about strategic goals. Upper management could be more aggressive and risk senior people ...


6

Saudi Arabia specific answer I'm assuming you are a migrant worker since you aren't a manager and it would be very unusual for a Saudi national to be treated this way. Unfortunately this is normal and part of the working culture, workers come from abroad and are often pushed to their limits for as long as they can take it. The pay is very good but there is ...


6

Why not do this? Have a quiet word and inform him that you found those images. Tell him to tidy up and you are having a long lunch break. End of story. We all make mistakes. Give him slack. He might give you slack in the future. We all make mistakes.


6

I did not properly communicate this technology change to other team members, and their expectations were that project should be completed sooner on my part, not later like it turned out to be. It sounds like there's a legitimate issue here, so it's not clear what there is to disagree with or comment on. Speaking with your manager and assuring him/her that ...


5

Contractors are easy to blame within a company The fact that you are a contractor changes things significantly, especially since you are also the tech lead. I don’t have an explicit answer to your question, but be careful that you aren’t being chosen to take the fall here. The CTO could just hide the cost overruns until it they hit and then blame you. The ...


5

Analyse your situation to the best ofyour capability! Under what conditions would you be willing to stay? What has to change? What's your way forward after the temp position? Would you have to go back? Could you go into another position? That is, get yourself clear on your constraints. Then, analyse your manager and your company: - Does your manager gain ...


5

Am I acting within my rights? Partially, I believe you're using company resources (email) to organise a meeting outside of the company to discuss company issues crosses a line. That's not to say you're not free to meet with whom ever you please outside of work for whatever purpose but if you organised it from company email (to or from) then IMHO that's not ...


5

Agree and move on. That's not an overly negative performance review (completing tasks thoroughly is a good thing!) and you acknowledge it's at least broadly accurate in regards to this particular project. Accept it and learn from the experience. The more you try to comment on it, the more you're likely to seem like you're shirking responsibility, and that ...


4

Some people don’t want to use it because they feel like they’re being asked a lot of questions and don’t want to have to deal with it. Talk to their managers. It's their manager's job to set their priorities. If that means they need more time for answering messages and should spend less time on other things, their manager needs to make that decision and ...


4

I'd like to complain to the management about this unfairness without naming people, because unfairness breeds resentment. Is that advisable ? It sounds like you already did complain ("I mentioned the above arguments also, but my request was still rejected.") but it didn't get you anywhere. Repeated complaints aren't advisable. What is the best way ...


4

Bob wants to "fire" Alice, over what sounds to be disagreements of substance not just expression. Meanwhile you think Alice is accomplishing good work, but perhaps could use some coaching on communication. Sounds like what you really need to do is move Alice off Bob's project team and onto yours. Trying to force "help" where it isn't wanted just won't ...


4

Welcome to the site! It seems like you're answering your own question: Management needs to decide how critical front desk coverage is, and come up with a working permanent solution. I would suggest the receptionist talk to his/her supervisor about this. Perhaps when requesting the vacation or sick leave, also ask: "Who will be covering for me while I'm ...


4

You are in a sticky situation. IF your employer transitioned your place of employment, which they should have, then you are now governed under those states laws. However, if the company has most of their people in CA their 'policy' may be to pay out vacation now matter where you live. Remote workers provide interesting problems for companies, especially ...


3

Disclaimer: I know absolutely nothing about working in Saudi Arabia and the culture surrounding it, my suggestion is based on my experience in Europe and the USA. You are in a position where both your manger and you, are unhappy with the current arrangement. You don't like to be worked around the clock, six days a week, and he doesn't like how little is ...


3

Unless remote working provisions are built into your employment contract I would be inclined to tread carefully. I've dealt with several companies whose workforce are predominantly remote workers however they've tended to be in the consulting space where collaboration between employees (on internal company objectives) seemed rare. Most employees were "...


3

Pretend that I want to get results with doing the minimum amount of work to accomplish what I need to accomplish... If I need information about a specific piece of software that the company developed, I can pull up the docs, read thru it follow the links, absorb those information and get my answer...or I can just ask a software developer via IM and have him ...


3

Ultimately, management is the only one that can create and enforce consequences for not using company software. If you're not a manager, you're going to have to get their buy-in to enforce such a thing. Users resisting adoption may be doing so because this software hasn't been integrated into their workflow. They may have technical reservations about the ...


3

If you are 100% sure that you had permissions to access the personal folder in the first place and there's no doubt about that, I'd tell him in person and not do anything about the files myself. It's his business in the end You would have to be the one making the call to perhaps delete files, that aren't stored anywhere else. I'd be upset, if you just ...


3

I am surprised that, in addition to telling him about the situation, no one mentioned that he might temporarily hide(given he has the user permissions to do this) the files, so they still exist, but are no longer searchable.


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