54

There is no way to say its not worth the effort, without implying its not worth the effort. Automation is basically trading a significant upfront cost for a low long term cost and Report generation is something that is often very standardized and doesn't need to change much. You can do the basic maths yourself to see if its worth it. If each report takes ...


22

Is earning a higher salary than your colleague a valid reason to get assigned more work than him? Forget about what Calvin or anyone else does or how much they are paid. When you are assigned tasks you need to be concerned only with what you are capable of doing. If you are overloaded with work, you need to let your boss know that the work that has been ...


17

It's your job to communicate this to your manager, so do so. Just tell them. Part of their role is to determine what constitutes "worth it". They can only make decisions based upon the information they have. It's your job to ensure that should new information come to light, they have access to that information so they can make the best decision. If you ...


16

The world isn't fair. Some people get the job (or get promoted over you) for a myriad of reasons, from being more skilled in something that is necessary for the position, to being better than you at kissing ass. Sure, the guy has absolutely no clue on how whatever you do works. But why are you so sure that this is the most important skill for this position? ...


16

Before even writing this, I upvoted @Gregory's answer, as I think it's succinct and addresses OP's issue. However.... OP, make a free appointment with Citizens Advice Bureau. They will instruct you on what to do next. Do this soonest. If you use a computer (assuming you are an office or IT worker), make sure there is nothing personal on it that you might ...


10

I don't like jumping to this, but you next step is to talk to either a lawyer or legal aid. They will know exactly your legal rights, and how to handle the fact you have copies of the emails. You should avoid contacting anyone within the organisation about this until you have gotten advice.


10

I sometimes have to wait for 1 hour or more to get an acknowledgement to my chat messages. Normally, I wouldn't consider a 1 hour delay to be much. You should have other things to work on or do while you wait. If the other person's response is blocking me on my only task/high priority task then it would become a problem after a few hours. Or sooner if there'...


10

I understand that you're disappointed you didn't get the position - and I can sympathize but you're looking at this from the wrong angle. As things stand now it's a done deal, you didn't get the job and refusing to help the incoming manager get their bearings isn't going to change that. You won't suddenly get offered the job if they can't perform - in fact ...


10

Is it ok to be expected to open the door for these painters? If management knows you are on site and have communicated to you that painters will be arriving and that you should allow them to enter then yes you are expected to open the door. If you have received no communication from management, I would not open the door. If the 3rd party has an issue with ...


9

I do have a bit of "what am I going to be surprised with next?!" baggage from previous jobs - at different companies. Sounds like a psychological issue. Take inventory of the facts: Your boss is happy Your work is new to everyone and you are doing the best you can with what you have You're an experienced worker who knows how things are done You said it ...


9

This is an excerpt taken from UK GOV Website (noticing the UK tag) The general notice period for taking leave is at least twice as long as the amount of leave a worker wants to take (for example 2 days’ notice for 1 day’s leave), unless the contract says something different. Unless your employment contract states otherwise (which it does - and is in fact ...


9

Is giving negative feedback based on anonymous hearsay acceptable for a manager ? For your manager, it was not anonymous. Someone said this to him in some way, so he knows who that person was, but was refraining from disclosing that information to you (which was good, as to avoid to make it personal). Chances are that this person is someone your manager ...


8

It sounds to me like you are not enjoying the task because it has turned out to be more complicated than you thought. Not only does automating this task free up one of your team members for 20 hours per week which is like gaining half a person on the headcount but it would mean that the reports are available for the business much sooner than now. Make sure ...


8

This really depends on context. It's entirely ok for interns to be given experience in real-world projects - you shouldn't really assume that your project is being handed over to someone with little experience and that you're now out of a job. Your manager won't be on vacation forever, so re-evaluate things when he returns. In the meantime, work on those ...


8

"I know that I thrive in situations where I have a managing/coordinating/organizing role" If you stick around for a while and also bare with boring tasks as well and gather enough overview/experience, working your way up (junior-> senior -> lead), you could later look into consulting/management. Given that you are around 30 there will be still a road ...


8

Should I just suck it up? Bring it up to anyone within the company? Something else? You could bring it up constructively. I suggest that you: Assume good faith Make the arguments about the matter, not the people. Choose your battles 1. Assume good faith Unless you have very concrete evidence, don't assume that your leads and architects making the wrong ...


8

Because they'll move to other IT roles. Software Engineer is sometimes an entry-level job and people may move to other roles after some years. They become IT architects, IT product managers, IT consultants, etc. A few even switch to non-technical roles, like project managers or Agile coaches. Even though they are still working in IT, they are less likely ...


7

I've worked in this kind of industry for many years in the past, where I've worked for a company that coded for clients. I spent about a third of that time working on client sites. Doing this makes sense - the clients get to know you and your attitude to your work, they see that your company is fully committed to them, and you (as a developer) have the ...


7

I do not want to give all my experience and know-how away and teach him from scratch all the things. You can't give away experience. Experience is a matter of reflection of the past. You can however use your experience to be valuable in this situation. Show that you're capable of transferring your knowledge to help your new boss avoid common pitfalls. ...


7

Culture trickles down. I've seen this from the good side, and from the bad side, and I'm pretty convinced it's universal. So what your question is isn't "Is there any possible way to improve the situation before quitting?" It's "What degree of change can I bring about with the CEO?" Because, realistically, you're not changing the situation unless you ...


6

Provide numbers, and be prepared to back them up. You're currently spending X hours to generate reports per week. Automating that task not only means you're not spending X hours to generate reports, you can now spend those hours doing productive work instead. This means you can produce more actual product than you can when your reports are automatically ...


6

Your managers role is to help you develop and this feedback is designed to help you develop. As you said, he has helped you develop in the past. If managers had to justify every single bit of feedback, through traceable evidence, it would be to the detriment to the workplace. There is nothing to suggest the person complained about you, or even criticised ...


6

I tend to read documentation first before asking others to explain things to me. So, I don't think I might have done anything to deserve the kind of reaction I got. But in this case you didn't read the documentation first. You knew there was documentation, old as it may be, but instead of looking for it and reviewing it first you reached out to your ...


5

Based on your answer in the comments section, you were not CC-ed nor received a copy of the communication/assignment in question. I would send my boss an email verifying the request, and would keep it simple. Something like: Hello Boss, Mr. Intern has requested me to walk him through my project X and that I should pass on what I have worked on so ...


4

If your colleague told your boss to do something, or simply refused to do the task they were allocated, it's no surprise they suffered a negative response. If your employment conditions have changed since you have been hired, it's fair to go to your boss and ask to renegotiate your contract. Especially if it is a change to something you asked about during ...


4

First of all, you should check you contract, if it includes bodylease or not. If not, he cannot lease you to another company. Please understand, that there is a difference between bodylease (AüG) and your company working for another company at their site (Werkvertrag). You should look up the differences and check with your situation, what applies to you. ...


4

I work for a company with a very similar setup. About 2/3 of the company officially works in one of the office locations (with the remaining 1/3 employees as fully remote), but most people work from home pretty often - Usually without notifying anyone either. I definitely hear the frustration that you're describing, since I've had that same experience ...


4

Young workers are preferred because they don't have family and other non-work obligations and thus are willing to dedicate insane amounts of time to the company's projects, and as importantly, they're cheap, contra your suggestion that they're better paid.


3

Is there any possible way to improve the situation before quitting? Personally, I think it's a bit of an overreaction to consider quitting, just to the fact that your boss is strict regarding dress code and for complaining about people taking PTO (which is different from denying the PTO). However, if you feel that such facts make it a place you no longer ...


3

First Question: Do I ask for a raise for myself and my "integral employee"? When you feel underpaid, you should seek a raise. There is nothing wrong with informing your boss that you believe you're worth significantly more and are unhappy with how your paid. You can inform the owner that you will look elsewhere if you don't get an adequate raise as long as ...


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