136

I would escalate to your manager, They will know who to talk to and will know how important this task is. Some people suggest that she might have it out for you, which could be true, but it's not very relevant to this case, as no matter how she feels about you, she doesn't respect your time or the issue that you are asking her to help you with. At this ...


60

In corporate environment no one believes in verbal communication, and probably the receptionist knows that. Try to bring things in written communication, like an email and mention that i have been chasing the card for weeks now, you dont have to go in too much detail but just something that makes her acknowledge that. Without an email it would be very hard ...


55

Your manager appears to want you to set the priorities yourself. If no one will tell you what the priorities and boundaries are, write up a document laying out those priorities yourself. Be sure to include estimates of time and effort you will spend per week in each area. Then, run it by your boss. If he doesn't like the priorities you've picked, ...


16

Per your comment: I talked to my manager about it before, and he just told me to just wait till the next week like the receptionist said. I believe the only thing you can do is give this person enough time to get their sh!t together, schedule your photoshoot, and commit to it. Your boss is aware you are waiting and the receptionist is aware you need a ...


13

One option that I have used in the past is proposing a priority list based on the resources (including time) that are available to me and informing my manager as such. Giving a deadline for feedback requires that either your manager adjusts your priorities or accepts the priorities (either by not responding by the deadline or explicitly accepting the ...


7

She yells profanity at people, accuses them of slacking constantly, has been known to throw things at them, calls our children "vermin", etc. Buy a copy of Cracking the Coding Interview and prioritize learning so you can jump to remote work for the duration of your wife's degree. You have been given a respite. Don't waste it. You will need to do this anyway ...


7

Going to your own manager (not the receptionist's manager) is the right way to handle this. If the receptionist is not fulfilling her responsibilities, it's not your job to get her to do so. Your manager may or may not speak to the receptionist's manager. You said in a comment that you've already spoken to your manager and were told "to just wait till the ...


7

The issue I take with this is: While some of us enjoy teaching others (manager included), it takes up my and other team members’ time, without much benefit to the product - time which could be otherwise spent in development. Is the product owner okay with the time spent on the training? If your manager is that person, then clearly the answer is yes, ...


6

How I can properly suggest this to my team leader ? "Hey, boss, team X is using tool Y and it saves them Z hours every week". It's as simple as that. Do it in a chat, wait for a team meeting, send an email - only you know your boss & company culture, so only you can decide how to say it - but that's what to say. If you present a clear benefit (minus ...


4

Unless he's directly causing or threatening harm to you or anyone else, mind your own business or take it up directly with him. Not his employer. And if he is posing an obvious physical threat to you or anyone, then take it to the police. Not his employer.


4

Asking questions, and asking for explanations of things, is a legitimate management technique. It's effective at surfacing misunderstandings and confusion, especially when done in a group. It's also good for cross-training people, so Adam knows something about what Betty is doing and vice versa. In any project, engineers have two main audiences. One is ...


3

If these homophobic posts are of the "hate crime" variety (I support mass shootings of gays in a nightclub, I think all those fa***ts should burn, etc.) then report them straight to the police, and Facebook. If they're of the "I have homophobic views" variety (I don't think gay people should be in the military, I don't think gay couples should adopt) then, ...


3

Four possibilities I can imagine: She's completely overworked and literally has no time for it. Or it's so low on her priorities list that more important tasks keep popping up. If this is the case I'd try to get my manager to give her a little nudge ("Hey Lisa, I've noticed Bob still has no badge, could you please take 15 minutes today and get him one?"). ...


3

Building a new application for one of our business units. This is a major production application which will take two years to build with current theoretical resources. Building a new (much smaller) application for another one of our business units. This should just have been a few weeks but stakeholder meetings drag on and on and on. First off, what ...


3

I'm no expert, but it sounds like you didn't discuss your job responsibilities with your boss before getting hired. Nevertheless, it's clear that your boss showed disrespect to you, as swearing and insulting is completely unprofessional. And from what you said, he's not the kind of person that will be eager to talk about how much the tasks given to you don'...


2

My manager doesn’t know what I should be prioritizing as it was his predecessor who made all the promises to various people. He just said “realize you will piss people off and know you won’t get fired.” What would you do in this situation? I’m mostly trying to figure out how I should prioritize my work/meetings attendance. You were already told ...


2

Before you decide to leave this job, I suggest you try something: give the boss another chance. NOTE: You didn't say whether the college has a fixed list of subjects which they must teach. You didn't say whether your boss gave your favorite subject to somebody else. Or did he reject your subject because it would be a new offering? The two are different. ...


2

Go to her and say "You're going to think I'm a total jerk for saying that you seem to be purposefully avoiding making a badge for me." Say it in your deepest voice that still sounds natural, with the inflection falling at the end, not rising. Don't be angry. Think of it like you are trying to get to know the person. You're open. You really want to know what'...


2

You mention in the comment that managment believe the reason is low pay. So you actually have an unfriendly, deaf work enviroment that is not compensating for the discomfort. The problem is that managment don't want to change it. They don't want to rise pay, or to make work life easier (for examply by opening bar on tools and work equpiment). If they ...


2

I would suggest exit interviews, but very few people ever tell the truth in those (not wanting to burn bridges). My current company has an annual anonymous surveys, conducted by an outside, third-paerty, company. We believe them to be truly anonymous because no one has been disciplined for feedback. Would your management accept this? If not, and you ...


2

At a startup this early stage, the only thing that matters is the individuals you'll be working with. Focus only on them, and if you feel you'll work well together. Things like organisational structure and culture don't really exist yet. To the tiny extent they do, you'll have an instant and ongoing huge influence on them anyway when you join. For example,...


2

You're handling this exactly right, by persevering in getting your issues addressed. Here's one suggestion. There's stuff you don't like about your present job. Describe some of that stuff, in general terms, and ask whether this other company has similar problems and how they might cope with them. Be vague about which company you're describing. For ...


1

That’s what your one-to-one is there for. If you think your time is being wasted, then that’s where you tell her.


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