13

Because they'll move to other IT roles. Software Engineer is sometimes an entry-level job and people may move to other roles after some years. They become IT architects, IT product managers, IT consultants, etc. A few even switch to non-technical roles, like project managers or Agile coaches. Even though they are still working in IT, they are less likely ...


11

Is it ok to be expected to open the door for these painters? If management knows you are on site and have communicated to you that painters will be arriving and that you should allow them to enter then yes you are expected to open the door. If you have received no communication from management, I would not open the door. If the 3rd party has an issue with ...


8

I tend to read documentation first before asking others to explain things to me. So, I don't think I might have done anything to deserve the kind of reaction I got. But in this case you didn't read the documentation first. You knew there was documentation, old as it may be, but instead of looking for it and reviewing it first you reached out to your ...


7

Young workers are preferred because they don't have family and other non-work obligations and thus are willing to dedicate insane amounts of time to the company's projects, and as importantly, they're cheap, contra your suggestion that they're better paid.


7

Before asking your manager anything I would suggest that you work on your resume and start applying to new companies. The situation at your company does not look good from what you have described and you need to be prepared for the worst case scenario. Also, asking your manager likely won't be helpful. If you are going to be laid of and he knows it, he ...


7

The way to approach this is to get clarity on the process. Sit down with your bosses and ask them exactly what it means for you to "prove yourself", and how long it will take. I would expect them to give you a definition of what a good shift is, and how long you have to run them to be approved. You should also ask what will happen if you don't prove yourself ...


5

How do I deal with a coworker who seems to be curt and avoids helping me In defense of your coworker, you asked him how to do C and D, he told you that there was documentation explaining how to do C and D and you proceeded to ask again without having even acquired the documentation. You were lucky that someone taught you how to do A and B, but you can't ...


4

I won't comment on the working weekends and holidays, or the 7-8 years old startup company. However... What you describe sounds like a security issue in the making, if not already one. Being expected to let strangers into the office, when upper management says nothing and your immediate supervisor doesn't know, basically means that just about anyone can ...


4

TLDR: Discrimination while giving pay raise can be illegal, check with lawyer IMO, The first thing you need to prioritize is your and your to-be-born child's health. No amount of pay raise will justify you working the long hours and putting yourself under undue stress. Next, while promotions are usually accompanied with pay raises, I did not come across ...


3

You can ask. Probably will not get a 'real' answer. It's been my experience that position eliminations (which is the HR friendly term for laid off) come from levels above a team lead or manager. I've had happen twice in the last three and a half years. In the first case back in Jan 2016 my supervisor knew of a pay raise and promotion I was to get but ...


3

Depending on the workplace, no, it could definitely not be OK for you to open the doors for outside workers. If management hires contractors, they should arrange for their access. If you let random people in, you might be held liable if they steal or vandalize anything. Yes, you might get questioned for not letting them in, but generally I would make a very ...


3

He hung up the call abruptly without saying bye or such which he does not do generally. Be careful you're not committing a Fundamental Attribution Error. Assumptions made about someone's character based on a single interaction are oftentimes misleading. You don't really know why he hung up on you. He could've been having a bad day or maybe he was running ...


2

Some sort of hybrid solution is likely to be effective. For example, you could split into two teams for the first 80 minutes to work on separate problems then re-assemble as a larger group and spend 15 minutes on each of the two problems to polish the solutions, leaving 10-minutes overrun time. The "correct" approach will vary depending on a wide range of ...


2

TL;DR Read the documents if you can find them. Ask your team for the documents if you don't have them. Ask your boss to help you if you can't find the documents, or if you don't understand them and can't get anyone to help you learn what you need to know. Analysis and Recommendations You actually have two problems, not just one. Remote workers can (for ...


2

Could you please post the exact location of your office, so next week a can come with my mates to take all the computers away for maintenance? Seriously, nobody comes in my office unless my boss has ordered me to let them in, and has told me how to identify them. And I’d have to watch them, so if they outnumber the office workers, they still can’t come in.


2

I'm a little bit unclear on a couple of points of the question, so please forgive me if I'm off-target. But, taking the questions (as I read them) in order: 1. Yes, it's absolutely OK to expect an on-site employee to let in workers that need access to the site. The part of your story that is unacceptable is that the person (or people) in charge of hiring ...


1

Whether or not you'd get an honest answer, which is really what you're looking for, is a function of how well your manager trusts you to keep your mouth shut, and how likely your manager is to need you so you can (probably) be reassigned to another team. First things first -- unless I didn't care about my own job security, I wouldn't tell you anything if I ...


1

What things should be considered when granting access to individuals to add/remove members to g-mail groups for a corporate g-mail environment. You should consider who should have the authority to add members to specific groups. Only you and your company can answer that. Should an HR generalist have the ability to add members to an HR group that deals ...


1

This depends on how well you know your team. In some cases a team will have one particular member who can see a problem in a wholistic manner and formulate a viable solution in broad strokes very quickly. You want this chap/chappess on both problems. Other times you don't have anyone who stands out, so it makes more sense to split the team. Like anything ...


1

I’ve faced the exact same situation. The way I solved it was to say, if you call the help desk we will track your issue to completion — I will guarantee you a response within X hours and a resolution in X hours or days (as per our published SLA) — I guarantee your request won’t get lost, and if the person who’s working on it goes out sick or on vacation, I ...


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