307

So here's the part that seems sketchy to me: You've asked your employee, John, to do unpaid overtime work on the weekend. The reason it's "work" is because learning Angular is not something John would like to do in his free time, hence why he hasn't done it already (and continues to not do it), and it provides no value to John personally except inasmuch as ...


233

I would report it. Don't hide your identity, there is no point. If your company asks Slack, Slack can probably tell them who accessed that file. It's all in the logs anyway. It's just a matter of someone reading through them. Personally, I don't even understand your need for hiding your identity. You did nothing wrong. In any case, better you be the one ...


227

You do this by presenting the thought process that led you to this conclusion - not the conclusion alone. This gives the team, or the individual, a chance to offer their perspective regarding your concerns. You might find that there are viable solutions to the problems you anticipate, which you did not think about. Ask prompting questions that highlight ...


211

"Not unless I get a better offer!" or "Not unless I get an offer too good to pass up." It is actually true. You're not leaving unless you get a better offer and until you hand in your notice. That is as true today as every other day. You can say as much, and your boss will probably ask "Are you looking?" - but it's normal and acceptable for employees to ...


189

You actually ARE in a position to change this. You lead by example. You can start using version control locally for your changes. You can simply 'commit' everyone else change at the same time. You will always be able to recover previous versions and compare things to prior versions. You can also offer to do this for the company. Setting up version ...


184

A wiser man than me said “You can make people stay in the office for 80 hours a week, but you can’t make them work more than 40 hours a week.” That’s the problem you are running into, and there’s nothing you can do. People come to the office because you pay them. They work because they want to. And you know why these people have no motivation to work.


173

As an introvert SE, I have my style of doing things and getting things done. Same here. But an introvert isn't a protected class, nor is it a disability, so anywhere you work isn't going to start running to make special considerations for you based on the fact you "just prefer to work in the zone". There's two angles I'd take here. Firstly, if any kind of ...


169

First of all, Congratulations!! That said, I believe your superior made his intentions very clear with the statement "I will review and determine the best way to move forward but this is not a democracy." You did your job, without having been asked, twice. Don't sweat it anymore, let them manage. You anyways have the proof that you tried helping. Your ...


158

My boss did not help things when he told Bill 'Bill, you're the guy until OP rolls his lazy butt in at 11:00', and that 'OP is really better behind a desk'. That's a huge RED FLAG: You are working the wrong issue. Your problem is the CEO, not Bill. There are clear indications that your CEO thinks that Bill is better at your job or more valuable than you ...


156

Should I do anything further (if so how) in terms of bringing this up to management, project manager, etc? They've already paid you in terms of your "expenses" and given you extra time off, so I'd think there's no point other than to vent anger (which is a bad idea). How can I approach booking any future time off given that this could happen again? ...


153

It's not a bad idea to mention it off-hand, but I wouldn't make a big deal out of it at all. You need to make sure this comes off as an FYI, and not any sort of accusation. Next time you see the CEO, just casually mention it. Hey boss, just so you know I let your brother into your office last week so he could get the keys to the car. Didn't want you ...


137

How would you deal with such situation ? After nicely comforting him, which you have already done, it's time to firmly tell them to deal with it. It is not an individual's code, but the company's. As a manager, you need the code to be as maintainable as possible by your team and new additions you make to the team in the future. "code formatting is ...


135

Like it or not, social or "soft" skills are more critical than you think. While I absolutely do not subscribe to the idea that a person's thought and behavior can be boiled down to a few letters, being an INTJ or an introvert does not preclude you from being a good workmate. Promotions always come with an increase in responsibility and almost universally ...


131

Honestly, my reaction would be the following: Bob, I appreciate the feedback, but as a team we've decided that we're using Black as our mandatory code formatting tool, and that decision is final. I understand it's not your personal preference, but I'm afraid that you're going to need to learn to work with it. But if I wanted to engage in a discussion? ...


131

I'm assuming that you are the manager of that team? Then I'm sorry, but from what you wrote, you seem to be a big part of the problem. If something goes wrong and a task doesn't get done because everyone thought someone else was doing it, then the reaction of the manager in charge shouldn't be "sigh, now finish the project [and leave me alone]", but rather ...


125

From your description of his behaviour and other actions, it seems the most likely result of any attempt to put your boss/founder "in his place" is that you will be fired - no matter how diplomatically you go about it. Brush up your resume and go find a better job where you won't be getting cut off at the knees.


114

You tagged your location as New Jersey. To be clear, what your employer is doing is very much illegal. Here are some references: https://www.fda.gov/tobacco-products/compliance-enforcement-training/report-potential-tobacco-product-violation https://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/tobacco/regulations/ You said, I know that this is probably illegal but I don't ...


110

Should I let management know that I consider leaving the company due to these practices? Never say directly that you are thinking of leaving - as soon as management know that you're not committed to the company, that always puts you at risk of being out of a job without a new one to go to. Or at least let them know that I am growing quite frustrated? ...


104

This question falls in the category “If you don’t want to hear lies, then don’t ask this question”. Your answer is “No”, or “No, what makes you think that”. You should give exactly the same answer as someone who doesn’t have the slightest desire to leave. Why is it Ok to lie? Because the question shouldn’t have been asked. And because you need to lie to ...


101

I suggest you take a note never to hire that employee's wife. And that should be it. This is an altogether embarrasing situation for the employee. It is quite likely that he didn't try to stop his wife because he knows her and knows trying to stop her would only make things worse. After all, she was drunk and out of control already. Increasing his ...


97

Depending on the laws in your area, a misstatement could result in liability on the doctor. Having a script to go by is not unusual, as some information may need to be restricted, or not disclosed for legal, or insurance reasons. Again, this varies. If the laws regarding medical information in your locale are NOT strict, then this is micromanaging, but ...


95

Now, my first reaction is to have a quite serious conversation with the colleague asserting that this behavior is unacceptable. Are there any better options? If the best solution is to discuss it, how should I frame it? Yes, I would say that a one-on-one conversation is in place here, where you explain to your subordinate that improvising or deviating from ...


95

what do you think I should do? Nothing. As long as you are not using company time and resource to make your side project, and you don't have a clause in your employment agreement which prohibits you from engaging in any sort of technical or business activities which is directly or indirectly have a conflict of interest with the current organization, your ...


91

Scot Adams coined the term "blamestorming" and this is a living breathing example. It's purely a cultural problem, and can be solved with changing the tone a bit. The only way to stop it is to stigmatize it. A little bit of sloganeering can go a long way. THE HARD SELL I'm not interested in excuses, I'm interested in solutions If you don't have any ...


90

Toughen up a bit. At this level, it's been one comment, poking fun at something you posted. It's obnoxious, but it's certainly not HR-level, and the fact that you think it is suggests that your sensitivity meter is dialed up too high by at least a few notches. You can offer cogent argument in the comments about how what you're suggesting is not the same ...


88

Why does it even matter? If what he asks doesn't help you, then ignore it. You're not quitting for it to be a benefit to him. You're quitting to benefit yourself. Strictly speaking, if you haven't resigned, he can legally claim you're staff, or consider you an employee without actually paying you, or just use your headcount to benefit himself, or commit ...


81

Pull him aside and apologize if you believe you were out of line. I have tended to respect managers in the past that were willing to see that they overreacted or jumped to conclusions. It doesn't have to be a long drawn-out discussion, but a simple, "Hey...didn't realize the circumstances of...."


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