New answers tagged

2

From what you have described the problem is not with the tooling. SPSS modeler uses Python and you can code in Python for it. But the tool is intended to reduce complexity of coding and ease of deployment. Switching to Python/R because lack of how to use the full features of a tool is not a good reason to switch. If you want buy in from management you would ...


2

They do not need it and are happy what they have and also - to my surprise - with what they are currently doing. There you have it. Your team is happy with what they are doing and their tools work well enough by them. You must prove to them your methods are better or necessary. Heliocentrism had this problem too— it was the better theory, but it took along ...


1

Size doesn't always matter, it's more about who has the control. I know companies who's head office is the smallest in terms of staff, but has the last word in everything to do with how the business is run. In terms of international communications and logistics the normal way I have seen it done is just handed out from head office. If there are issues then ...


0

Public shoutouts at least can be a good idea. My employer does them, and it makes me feel more engaged, connected, and situationally aware. Here are some implementation details that might make a difference. Our shoutouts don't come from the top down. The people praising each other are rank-and-file peers, or, at least, people nearby each other in the ...


0

Documentation In general developers like developing. They have deadlines - usually unrealistic. Documenting what they have done is very often the last thing on their mind. If the software works leave it alone and move on to the next stage. The problem associated with this is that end users don't understand and future developers don't dare to meddle too much ...


2

Context: French, in a large company, many times in charge of either interns or apprentices. When choosing them, I always told them that I am not a good manager and that I expect them to be very independent. They will have a more or less defined subject and that they will be on their own. They will be free to come anytime to discuss, challenge, get advice. We ...


4

Sorry you're having difficulty. I don't know how things are in France, but I did a similar program in the US and learned a great deal, some of which had nothing to do with my field of study (engineering). In fact, the most useful things I learned were about dealing with different managers and co-workers, so you have an opportunity to learn here. Here's a ...


8

You have two separable objectives in this work placement: Gain as much useful knowledge and experience as you can. Meet your university's formal requirements. You should find out from your university one simple thing: what constitutes "official success/credit" for the work/study. If there is someone at the company who will need to certify to the ...


7

You have a subject, that's at least something. What I would suggest is define yourself a goal. Let's say you're studying IA, you could set your sight on a AI tool like Tensor Flow and build something. Even just following a tutorial to learn the tool. Give you a day or two max to find something. Once you have define yourself a short, clear and achievable goal ...


0

I do not know where in the world you are based but I was in a fairly similar position. The company that I worked for was profitable without selling any more physical product and was bought out by a large US multinational company. They hade bases in low wage economies for manufacturing and lower tech development work. We were told in no uncertain terms that ...


114

The general advice for this kind of situation is to present solutions to your bosses, not problems. "I don't have any work to do" is a problem. You're asking them to spend time and effort to solve this problem by finding work for you to do. (whether they ought to be doing that, given that this is a work study program, is neither here nor there. It ...


40

Talk to your university. I'm not familiar with the particulars of French academia (and academia can vary more than many people think it does), but your university arranged this work/study program as a learning experience for you. If you're not doing anything productive or educational, then you're at risk of failing to meet the requirements that the ...


1

You are right to want to move, as you've sensed correctly ("any attrition would be backfilled in lower cost offices") that the work is being outsourced/offshored -- probably at first through a process of 'passive' attrition like this, but sorry to say I've no doubt that eventually this whole subteam will eventually get 'backfilled' to the other ...


2

The fact that they are "not rational" may not have much saying with the success of the company, lot's of companies are run by idiots, even very successful ones. The fact that they are superstitious also doesn't mean: they're going to default on your payments; they're going to deny good money, I've seen non superstitious people deny offers for ...


3

To be honest, it seems you're fixated on this methodology, when it appears it's long been cast aside by those in upper management and instead you're just left with bog-standard under-resourcing (and yes, just general mismanagement). I think it's time you just make the assumption that whatever remnants of that organisational structure that remain are no ...


10

I've taken that as a hint that eventually my team will cease to exist in this location. That seems pretty clear. I want to move to another team with a future in this location so that I have the motivation to learn and progress. Am I right to move team? Maybe. Since the corporation feels comfortable replacing the high cost folks in your subteam with ...


4

I'm going to go against the grain here and say I have had good experiences with public callouts. I think giving genuine thanks does create a positive workplace culture. However if you are currently in a workplace culture where you keep your head down unless the boss comes to yell at you, it could be a bit of a culture shock. Here are a few examples from my ...


0

I think a lot of workplaces tend to believe that praising work publicly is a great idea. Ultimately, I feel like places that do this tend to be a bad place to work at. The reason being is that they tend to have high attrition or all time lower morale. The question I have in reverse is how do you handle employee reviews? Do you give them raises frequently? Do ...


6

I thought back to my time as a cog in a Fortune-500 company and this set off "it's a trap!". It's for fun now, but at some point management will decide to count shout-outs and include that on performance reviews. My paranoid co-workers would have immediately arranged an informal mutual shout-out network -- "you guys are so willing to help I'm ...


3

Big companies are very cautious, often with good reason. They won't allow untrusted software to be installed on machines. They won't like their intellectual property downloaded to machines they have no control over. If you're a big target, then hackers are a constant problem, not some theoretical threat that happens to other people. If you can't live with ...


2

Real time firmware debugging is a serious challenge. You have not just the issues with "does the code work" but also the issues of "does it work in the allotted time?" It takes significant imagination to read existing code and determine what types of problems could be happening with that code and associated interrupts and possible multi-...


11

A manager one time was passing on a bit of wisdom to me. If they ask me to saw this table in half, and will not give me a saw, but only this pen, I'll do it, but I will be very clear about how long it will take me. If they're good with that, then I'll get going. Explain the limitations, ask for accommodation. Be concise, precise, and detailed. Quantify, ...


3

How can I discuss with manager that current setup in effecting my performance and ability to do tasks, I know his answer will be that is that the best we can do, should I discuss or start looking else where? Still, send a formal meeting invite, have the conversation, describe the pain points and note the provided answers, then send a MoM email after the ...


9

Since you're looking for actual evidence, I'd suggest you look at books written or inspired by Edwards Deming, the father of just-in-time manufacturing He found that individual incentives had potentially negative effects within organizations. Instead, he emphasized collective incentives or team incentives, over individual incentives. For instance at Toyota, ...


11

My employer does something similar. It is called "Partner Points"; it is run by Achievers. Each month, every employee is given 500 points to award to any other employee they wish, publicly. Points accumulate over time and can be redeemed for various goods (think of a credit card rewards program). The employer, of course, pays monthly for the ...


15

Although I haven't worked anywhere that does public-shut-outs via Slack, I have worked at companies which didn't publicly acknowledge success, companies which did acknowledge success in a not particular fair way, and a company which did it in (I think) a fair way. When there was no public acknowledgment of success, I didn't feel particularly engaged with the ...


77

Is a public “shoutouts” channel a good or bad idea? It's a bad idea. A terrible one. Same as "employee of the month", for the reasons you yourself have mentioned. I've had personal experience with these in small companies, and most of the time the wrong (or popular) employees get the credit, and the hard working ones go unnoticed. This leads to ...


132

I used to work for a very large US based company that used to pride itself in having a very large number of Engineers. It would constantly boast about the large numbers and how technically excellent it was - this was to the outside world. Internally there were regular town hall meetings that were delivered on various levels - Corporate, Business unit, ...


5

Management should be open and transparent to an employee about his/her performance, and relate praise when it has been given/deserved. When an employee does well, others should message that employee directly and/or message that employee's manager. In an ideal world managers would have full insight into everything their employees are doing, good and bad. ...


4

I would agree with your points that it may have unintended effects for the employees, and potentially even bring liability to the company if there's ever a complaint about management favoring one employee or discriminating against others. By announcing your support of a given employee's performance publicly, you're putting out public data that can be counted ...


0

"Public, peer-to-peer shoutouts?" I will very candidly say that you will very soon regret that idea. "Some people legitimately don't like public callouts, even if they are well intentioned." (obvious comment omitted) "Stick to business!" Whatever business you are in. Don't focus on "what other team members say they ...


6

When dealing with people who are not rational, you have to consider "what is the most irrational thing that could possibly happen here?". To which the answer is more or less limitless, so you have to account for that. Let's say the company gets off the ground and is making some small amount of money, enough to pay the bills but not much more than ...


9

Totally agreed with Phillip Kendall that you should run away. However, I'd like to add one thing. It sounds like you're at the start of this business and right now money is good because the owner probably has a lot saved up/borrowed. At some point, it's going to dry up and you'll be stuck looking for a job. My thought is you should stick around until at ...


4

Most startups fail, particularly those with innovative and creative ownership or payment strategies instead of innovative and creative products. Owners like this are best avoided altogether.


19

They are heavily superstitious folks and based many if not all decisions from advises by psychic, shaman, medium of sort. Run away as fast as you can to somewhere which isn't run by idiots. This business will fail, it's just a question of whether it's today, tomorrow, next month or next year.


3

The CEO is appointed by the board and can be sacked by the board. Often the CEO is also Chairman of the Board. In either case the board can usually get rid of them unless they hold controlling equity. Both positions are contracted ones and may have even easier termination clauses. But when all else fails it comes down to shareholding. If you can get enough ...


11

You should absolutely hire a lawyer. A good one. Who specialises in this kind of thing. And do it discreetly. This is not the kind of situation where you can afford to make a mistake or tip your hand. Even/especially if you don't end up going ahead with it. You need to find out the answers to the following questions: Who owns how much of the (voting) stock ...


1

People respect when others take responsibility however, just because you're respected doesn't mean you're free from consequence. I have rarely seen this have much value. In my 15 year career employees who admitted fault at something were always taken out and shot while people who made excuses or just covered things up had good careers. The main value is ...


4

Rational for whom? For the company it is entirely rational to want people to admit mistakes, because it allows for more targeted corrective action, and prompter and more effective mitigation of damages. For the employee it can be entirely rational to hide problems so they can evade consequences (if they have a reasonable expectation of success, and will ...


-2

Not much you can do if you don't have a contract other than buying him out. But first: consider communication therapy/counselling (together) first to make sure that he understands your feelings, and perhaps there's something going on in his personal life that explains his behaviour but he's unable to communicate it. Maybe you can work on it if you have a ...


2

The 'correct' answer might depend on the size of the organization. Generally, it's easier to hide in a large organization, unlike a start-up where everyone needs to pull their weight. In addition, it depends on your own ambition. If you're driven by promotions, you will probably need to play the political game. If your work satisfaction depends on the ...


5

Excellence demands taking responsibility If you want to have a great career, good, that is a goal worth chasing. Is it necessary to take responsibility to have a great career? Not at all. You have to be good at other things though, a sixth sense for getting out of the line of fire will be necessary. If you develop your intuition it can become fairly easy to ...


1

In my 15 year career employees who admitted fault at something were always taken out and shot while people who made excuses or just covered things up had good careers. Well, if the people that lie and cheat become the next management, then guess what their values are. It's a self-reinforcing spiral of doom. Yes, this is valuable, but only in companies that ...


10

Taking responsibility is one of those behaviors people claim to respect, but often practically don't. It is not because they are being dishonest. That is because respecting it and not viewing it as a sign of incompetence requires a degree of cynicism and not taking the comparables (co-workers who do not admit errors) at face value. (Story is anonymized, so ...


2

Is dodging responsibility the most rational workplace strategy? No, the best strategy is to NOT BE responsible for problems. Do your work professionally and conscientiously and issues may still arise, but you would have no need to evade responsibility for them.


9

In my 15 year career employees who admitted fault at something were always taken out and shot while people who made excuses or just covered things up had good careers. In my experience, it's almost always the opposite. I have to say this, the workplace(s)/organizations you mention, does not sound very good ones to work for. If one employee can get away with ...


2

Informing the company How can I update the CTO that these things should be done before a new hire so they can get on with understanding and working without raising eyebrows that 3 days into new role and he is telling us our issues? You already are: Meanwhile I have been asked daily for the report and I say to them that the team is working on fixing the ...


1

I been asked daily for the report and I say them the team is working on fixing the issue about making it work but I cannot see the website. This is all you can do. Refer them to the team who's job is creating the issue and ask for any suggestions on what you can do in the meantime.


4

You can do two things: There are certain things which can be reviewed without seeing the code in action. This includes coding standards, coding conventions and best practices, security policies and principals, usage of (third-party) libraries etc. Go through the codebase and provide your comments. Suggest improvements if you see the scope. You can also ...


4

You're really just looking for a Kanban-style board with a ticketing system (i.e. JIRA, Trello, literally anything that'll let you move tasks around). Kanban as a concept may not be exactly what you're looking for going by the dictionary definition, but it's definitely what you're looking for in terms of implementation. You typically have 3 columns in a ...


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