New answers tagged

2

You should ask about why you are not getting the options you prefer. The fact that you are being asked your opinion is good, and the fact that you aren't getting the option you choose doesn't mean management is out to get to. One probable scenario is that everybody is being asked their choice. However if the difference is between Project A with cool new in-...


-1

You should review the rules regarding social media use for federal employees in the United States: https://ask.fedweek.com/federal-government-policies/social-media/ If you were tweeting on your own time, then there's no problem; your boss was out of line. Does your personal Twitter in any way reference your position/work with the federal government? Then ...


1

You said, Yes, I work for a public entity, but I am a citizen outside of work. I should have the right to discuss public issues and public officials outside of hours on my personal account. Unfortunately, that's not really true. Many question the legality of this sort of social media policy, but the answer to that question is fairly black and white. The ...


4

When you work in the public sector, the rules are a bit different. I actually suspended or deleted many of my social network accounts when I did contract work for the government, and I have had family members that had security clearances. Your boss ABSOLUTELY has the right to keep you from engaging in getting involved in politics. In the military, for ...


2

Is it remotely OK for my supervisor's supervisor to prohibit me from making social media posts that name elected officials? It depends what you mean by "OK" in this context. If you are asking if they have the right to prohibit these sorts of posts, the answer is probably "Yes", but you need to check your union contract, employee handbook, etc. I am ...


-4

However, today I was reprimanded for a social media post I made on my personal twitter. The account is not associated with my work. These sentences contradict each other. How would your work know what you posted if it is truly separated? My advice, unfriend/unfollow anyone from your work on your account and make it private. That way you can voice your ...


0

Considering the sad state of fake news media nowadays, here's a headline you should expect. "Data Scientist at State Department of Environment criticizes Mayor Doe for Bill C-999. Here's why you should be concerned" "Climate Change researchers at agency think this bill is problematic" "Employees at Agency X blasts Mayor Doe for ineffective bill" Now ...


5

The workplace I work at has a Social Media Policy, to help out with these kind of cases. It might be worth it to inquire if such a policy exists in your workplace as well. Just because you don't think it's offensive, doesn't mean everyone else thinks so as well. With a few clicks anyone could find out through my LinkedIn for what company I work and as such, ...


1

We live in a world where someone might be forced to pay a £50,000 fine and attend an education course for posting something to a friend on twitter, in which none of the involved took offense neither it was related to their professional capacity in any way. So yes, it looks like we are, as a society, traveling down the path where we consider anything said ...


-4

I think that somebody had been nagging your boss or the company's head about this and they, in turn, had to reprimand you. Things like these are not usually written in policy but instead handled on a case to case basis. Since you work in a public company, in an ideal scenario, nobody should've been bothered about whatever you post anywhere on your personal ...


1

Promotions / hiring for management level happen pretty much like any promotion / hiring. A boss / supervisor / higher level manager evaluates the candidate, and if: there is a position available and the candidate meets the requirements for the position, then the candidate gets the promotion / gets hired. The criteria for evaluating the candidate are ...


8

Do not get into this. It is likely to go badly for you. I went to schools which were absolutely full of the children of people in this situation. Many reasonably wealthy families have the problem of children who are nowhere near suited to taking over the family business. 9 times out of 10, they get given it anyway to keep the peace within the family. ...


10

How can we manage to tell him that family members do not work productively when he is out? You are a marketing coordinator. Unless these family members work for you or the owner asks you about it directly, it's not your job to be the company tattle tale. The owner has decided that he doesn't need to be there often, despite knowing that his family is not ...


6

He knows his family is not capable of keep the company moving forward, so he hired 3 new professionals, which I'm part of. It sounds like he understands this and is trying to take steps to fix it by hiring you three. Ultimately though it sounds like your job is in jeopardy since you were hired to fix this deficiency. My thought is you should sit down with ...


9

The situation you describe has the potential to be quite delicate. It's good that you're interested in ensuring the business is successful and productive, but a family business can be quite challenging to manage. I would suggest that you have a frank discussion with the owner/manager, but be careful to: Listen to the owner about his/her desires for the ...


1

Who should say a number/percentage of a raise? In the end it's the manager who decides, but ideally both sides are content with the result. So, as a manager you should do your homework and have an idea how much you think is reasonable. You need to do your homework because some employees underestimate their own performance, and others overestimate it. But ...


4

Compensation is an important part of your organization's overall performance management system. There isn't a definitive standard process or framework though - instead your organization should use a process matched to the nature of your business and values as an organization. However, there are some more typical elements of an organization's financial ...


4

Uh, you've got a few different problems you're having to deal with at the moment: You've got a coworker making lots of mistakes. You've got a coworker that's causing interpersonal strife. You've got a coworker that you don't have a productive communication channel with. You've got a boss that you can't talk to (technically, your former boss' boss is now ...


1

An important part of any job is letting people know when there are problems. If you can't do a job that your boss has assigned because you haven't been trained or are waiting for an answer from another team, you should warn him. When you have problems with another team, your boss can help you - but only if he knows. Equally important: if he knows there's a ...


2

Psychological harassment is not a useful cause I am not contesting your claim, although I feel it is certainly possible to discuss what is and is not harassment, but that is not the crux of my argument. The point I am going to try to make, is that assigning an external cause to your difficulties is not useful for you in any way other than that it is ...


0

I suggest: talk to your supervisor directly to sort out this issue, politely ask him to stop using this kind of language (or write him an email), and tell him that if he continues this kind of communication, you'll write something on his Linkedin asking questions around sucks - even they encourage it, the only reason to ask questions is to learn, yes, but ...


8

I later realized that this is psychological harassment. Now that I'm aware of it. How do I deal with it in the future? I feel that your premise that this is psychological harassment is not necessarily true, although I understand that it can be frustrating. It seems more like a communication problem that was left unattended... Anyways, more important ...


0

Its mostly about your contract and what you are contracted to do. In the UK you can not be forced to work more than 48 hours per week. You should speak with Acas They provide free and impartial advice for workplace rights and can instigate tribunals if needs be.


6

People in this thread have given some very good answers so far. If this is a case of micromanagement I would keep a record of when you go on breaks. Keep a small notepad in your pocket and write down the date, the time you left, and the time you returned from any break. Distinguish between a break and when you had to use the restroom so they can't accuse you ...


2

I've had two supervisors sit me down and ask about being absent from the floor A good place to start would be with either your line manager, or these supervisors (I'd talk to my line manager, but you'll have to judge who is the most relevant in your workplace). Tell them that you'd like to fix the issue that's been raised, and ask how you should handle ...


11

The fact that your absence creates the problems (or at least, they claim it to be a "problem") indicates two things: There is no proper communication of the break-time schedule. There is no proper escalation matrix both of which are required (and usually mandatory) in a scenario where a continuous monitoring and management is required and expected. As you ...


0

Based on: running around everywhere trying to find me (melodramatic and unnecessary about something that was not at all urgent and could wait). and that I couldn't be found anywhere It seems like the problem is getting in contact right away rather than the breaks themselves. The complaints centre around getting in contact with you and finding you ...


0

So my question is, how best do I handle this? It's always hard to answer this as best in this case very much depends on a lot of factors that we don't really know given that we know so little about you. The best advice I can give would be to talk to your manager about these grievances that you have. Specifically you don't want to be "On Call" so to speak ...


2

Congratulations to your new job. What you (and others) can learn from it: Never let your boss stress you. If you think you're doing a good job, and your boss is picking on you, keep on doing your good job. Don't give a **** about what the boss is saying to you. Keep working your normal time, without rushing, because everyone except your stupid boss knows ...


2

In addition to the other good answers, I would say that you should talk to your CTO about how this is bad for the company. You are, as you say, a single point of failure. If you decide to leave then the company will have nobody with the expertise to maintain the systems. The CTO should see this as an unacceptable level of risk (and you merely mentioning the ...


-1

At first look, you did the correct thing (I would have done the same), however, you need to be 100% sure that everyone knows you are doing things right, as the decision you are making are not part of your usual job description. I completely agree with the answer provided by HorusKol, clarify the situation as soon as possible by providing the complete ...


10

Handling these types of emergencies, and working late to get them sorted out, is normal for members of ops teams. For me, it took a while to adjust to this style of working. But, believe me, you can adjust if you give it some time. If you get loopy when you're hungry, keep an emergency stash of energy bars in your work place. They help a lot. Just keep in ...


14

Tell your manager exactly what you said to the worker - "take a rest and feel free to leave if you think you need to" - and ask if that was okay. It may be the worker didn't fully report your conversation. You also might ask for more training on policies and regulations if you are regularly being left in charge like this.


2

So my question is, how best do I handle this? Make a list of the things that you think are unreasonable. Come up with potential solutions to those issues. Present them to your boss. If your boss doesn't acknowledge and address them and doesn't attempt to at least find some middle ground then find a job elsewhere. Your boss may not be willing to do anything ...


20

I understand that as SysAdmin I will occasionally have to work overtime, possibly at short notice, but this amount is clearly unsustainable for my health, and strikes me as unreasonable. Why do you think that it's unreasonable? Are the failures non-critical? Can the company carry on until tomorrow without them, and without suffering any substantial ...


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