New answers tagged

0

The "sabbatical" or "specialist" tracks. You can ask for an 'atypical' kind of 'promotion' instead - to a specialist. Frame to your boss that, in the interest of your career growth, you feel you need to 'branch out' to a specialist role. Maybe a side-angle on how being management without 'returning to practice' will make you weaker over ...


0

Make him an offer he CAN refuse I own my company and I have to handle contracts. I'm in the IT market and I manage technology well. However, just like you, I can't manage people. Sometimes I hit a nice contract and all of a sudden the contractee requests me to manage some of their employees. When this happens I make them an offer they usually refuse: I ...


2

Others have already covered this very well - talk to your boss again. One thing that I haven't seen anyone mention is that in your last conversation your boss said they need you and don't have anyone else to do the role. Assuming that's the real reason, that gives you a lot of information about what their concerns are and you'll need to address them to shift ...


2

If you don't want people to argue, stop giving reasons One thing I've found is that the more reasons you give for a decision, the more leverage you give someone who doesn't agree with that decision to argue with you. So if you want to stand firm on that decision, you're going to need to draw a line in the sand, which means 1) deciding that you're not looking ...


1

Are you a good fit for the old job ? Simplified, your story goes like this: you did job A for some time, then got promoted and got job B. You are not satisfied on job B, so you want to get back to job A. Job A and job B are related, and you could do job A with your eyes closed and hand tied behind your back, right ? Well ... don't be so sure. I will give you ...


7

Some companies don't handle demotions well. Bosses / HR / company don't agree on this. New bosses handle old boss poorly, as they fear their experience and power over the team. How will you be able to criticize your successor? Pay cuts and losing other benefits are difficult to take or other people assume so. You should consider searching a different job ...


19

Create a succession plan It’s great your boss is willing to be so flexible. Try to use this flexibility to plan a solution that will meet both your needs. Day-to-day management of 24 reports can be tough. But you are apparently good at it. It would be easier, and probably more enjoyable, to provide guidance (and occasional backup) to one or two folks who ...


11

I would do this quite simply: "Hey boss, since our last meeting I have thought a lot on my immediate future. I have come to the conclusion that it makes most sense for me to go back to my project management role. I do not feel well fulfilling the role I have right now, even though it honors me that you think I'm the only person able to do it. Let's sit ...


44

Bring it up to your boss!! "Again!" Each of you of course have different concerns and angles – (s)he has a team to run, and you're about to have a baby – but the two of you have got to communicate. Seriously – print out this forum comment and set it down on the desk in front of him or her. (You have actually referred to several dimensions of the ...


0

Is your boss receptive to scientific studies? The research is pretty consistent in that multitasking comes with a high task switching cost (at least 40% of time lost to switching back and forth between tasks according to one study) and leads to increased errors (no surprise there). These issues grow in magnitude as the complexity of the tasks increases. (To ...


2

I did something like that for more than three years in a consulting and development company. Know what? It turned out one can learn to multitask! You really can! It is painful... that was the hardest job I ever had and it took years to recover after leaving that company (for other reasons). But today I can multitask pretty well. So if you're ready to go ...


3

Changing your company is always going to cause hurt feelings; by changing your company, you're basically saying "this company isn't good enough, that company is better than you", and that always sucks to hear. This is doubly true when the company really sucks, because not only do they suck and they know they suck, but they also know that up until ...


23

You don't have to ignore emotions and feelings, to still accomplish what you're looking for: leaving. What you do have to do, though, is wait until things are final - you have an offer that you've accepted. Once you've accepted, the right way to approach your boss is, roughly: Hi, [boss]. I wanted to let you know that I really value everything you've done ...


3

So i accepted it, the issue is that now i have to tell it to my boss that seen me growing up, helped me a lot in my personal life and he was like almost a "father" for me with obv all the cons about the "life" in the company. Reading the OP, You also said... so we started to discuss about it as X was too low for the job i was actually ...


0

What keeps a person motivated differs for everyon. These are just some tips that have worked for me. But to find your own motivation you have to try to see what works and what doesn't. I feel like there are three stages of work to be motivated at. Starting a task Working on a task Finishing a task Starting a task It is sometimes hard to find the motivation ...


75

Never tell anyone anything - ever That's that. When you have a written signed offer from your next company, just politely hand in your resignation at your current company. During your career you will change jobs many times. It's a non-issue. Never fall for absurd emotional B.S. "saying lot of emotional stuff" ... Managers and owners use various ...


8

Had a similar situation to your and I know the feeling. You feel like you owe the old man. BUT I can almost guarantee you that as soon as you worked a couple of months somewhere else you will notice that it wasn't all that great. As someone suggested wait until you have an offer and then tell him. It is business. If this is a serious businessman he won't be ...


41

Wait until you've gotten a job offer from another company. The simple answer to your question is "don't". You continue on as though everything was fine, until you've received a job offer from another company and you're ready to actually resign - and I don't mean just a good interview, I mean that the contracts have been signed and you've actually ...


0

One of the paradox of life is that action is the fuel that powers motivation. Waiting to feel "motivated" before doing something is often counter productive. So start your work, and you will start feeling motivated. A good process for this is to begin the day by listing all the tasks you have to do that day, break it into sub-tasks if necessary, ...


0

If I don't complete the task right away, he will often walk to my desk and stand behind me and watch until the task is done This is not acceptable on a personal/human level. This behaviour demonstrate a lack of trust in you and is not reasonable. If you want to do things, but has no trust in you saying "I will do it", why waste time and walk to ...


-15

Your manager expects you to multitask but you are unable to, so it’s fair to say you are unable to fulfil the company expectations. What you can do here is offer a split of your salary. So if your manager wants you to do two things, you can only do one. Fine, just take half of your salary. The other half can goto a new part time. You are happy, your boss is ...


12

It doesn't sound like he is reasonable, but if you want to try to reason with him, one article to have him read is this one: by Joel Spolsky. It points out, that even if task switching had no cost, it still results in a longer average finish time. And it does have a cost, sometimes a quite significant one. And then, while you are looking for a new job, do ...


2

This is a broad question, so I'll keep my answer general. Motivation depends heavily on personality, but it's rare that the following doesn't have an impact: Get paid well (ie. ask for a raise, or find a better paying job) Work less & less harder (assuming you're not already doing so little that you're bored) Work efficiently, ie. be accomplishing ...


4

What i found very useful is to break down my tasks and think about what value and enjoyment it can bring me. Also it’s worth to write a to-do list and tick or highlight the tasks you completed, i think it’s very motivating to oversee on a day to day basis how much you have achieved. Reaching out to working collegues can help boost morale and can have a ...


8

Sounds like sunken cost fallacy. If you are not a co-owner it is hardly worth working more than 8 hours a day. Your quality of work drops anyhow if working longer. I would suggest that you also look for a new job. Ideally one which leaves some time for your hobbies or just recovery from work. Another hint: Do not focus so much on velocity, but on ...


9

The team is also tired. Many resignations. They feel the work done today will be scrapped tomorrow. Follow your coworkers to a new job. You're not motivated, and your mental health has taken a hit. These are 2 clear signs it's time to move companies. EDIT - I don't think you will last much longer here. Plan your escape. The CEO is a bad manager. It ...


-1

Make sure there is someway to shadow him or put someone else with him. He will produce or he won't. If he doesn't the benefit of having someone working with him will pay off in figuring out where he left off and what he's done.


1

I would normally just discuss this with him Obviously, you should discuss it with him first. Perhaps he doesn't share your desire for him to "be trained the classic way". If he does, there is no problem - you can agree on an approach that suits both of you. If he doesn't then you need to determine what happens with the "partnership" ...


1

This is simple, you are the boss. It sounds like he's just throwing obstacles in your way, honestly. An experienced developer will commit and push code very frequently to their own branch - the only place where there would be a concern for pushing broken code, would be a release, integration, or master. Did you put him in a position to re-architect the whole ...


4

This is a simple accountability loop: Set Expectations Monitor Performance, support, train Assess Performance Consequences: Corrective action or reinforcement back to 1 That said, my experience is that some employees just never "get it." So the consequences eventually end up being termination.


11

There are 2 possible things that could be happening here: This developer is very incompetent. You have a docker configuration for development, so it should be fairly simple to append whatever needs to be done for production. In theory you already have production infrastructure set up, and documentation (or a domain expert) on how to productionize the ...


1

It seems like you are dealing with an inexperienced developer, who is not used to being managed. Maybe he's done solo/freelance work before and has technical skills, but from what you wrote, you are probably his first supervisor (at least the first who actually supervises). Your company, your reality. Up to you to know if you can afford to straight up the ...


1

My suggestion is to write him a new email in which you use a combination of the following three strategies. Make it really easy for him to take a quick look at your code. For example provide a link to the relevant shelveset/branch in the email, or put the changed procedures/functions in the email with the changes highlighted. Let a colleague whose judgment ...


0

What should I do in this situation? Keep sending him reminders (every few days, don't wait several weeks between reminders) and keep asking him what you should do while you wait. There isn't much else you can do to get him to review your work in my opinion. If he doesn't really have anything for you to do, you should probably use this time to try and ...


8

What should I do in this situation? Send a reminder every week by mail and ask him if he was able to review your code. In the meanwhile you could make yourself useful by: review it yourself and see if you can improve bits 'n pieces write test-cases or implement automated testing write documentation regarding your code and it's functionality maybe write a ...


-1

If just half of what you say about the intern is true, then he has to go. For his own good as much as for the company's and yours. I do think that you should query the process that allowed a defective candidate to be accepted while - almost certainly given the ratio of candidates to internships - allowing competent candidates to be rejected. This is not ...


22

...[D]o you think I should go one step further and investigate how someone so incompetent was hired? Going to ask you straight up: What are your expectations of interns? I'm working with two interns and bringing two more on board as well, and I must say that the expectations that I have of my interns are pretty simple: Pair with a senior developer or ...


11

Internships exist because schools do a poor job of preparing people for actual work. School assignments tend to be spoon fed and overspecified. Being "familiar with a stack" to a student often means "I have heard of it and completed the getting started tutorial." "Portfolios" are often collections of slightly-customized tutorial ...


0

Put them on a Performance Improvement Plan. If this intern is just a very junior employee, put them on a Performance Improvement Plan like any other junior employee who's incapable of doing their job. Lay out clear guidelines for what goals you expect them to be able to achieve by when, and if they don't meet those requirements, then fire them. If you ...


8

There are different approaches to managing people, and you seem to be stuck with micromanaging your intern. Dicating code helps no one. It frustrates you and probably makes your intern feel incompetent as well. Treat this as an exercise for yourself. If all employees were skilled and highly motivated, there would be little need for management. What you can ...


3

Any given intern (or any other candidate) applying to any given company may not actually know much at all about the topic at hand. In some cases they may get through the interview process even though the company wouldn't want to have hired them had they known what their level of knowledge was. In other cases the company may see it as more of a teaching ...


2

The tool you are looking for is 'performance management'. There is a course you can take on this. Do the course before you are forced to do anger management. I have seen 'inexperienced' people hired on purpose for fun just to see if their supervisor had the skills to cope. Try asking your boss 'When did special needs teacher become part of your job ...


72

I have been in your same situation, and I was among those who interviewed and picked the intern. Apparently the intern was great at talking, and thus aced the interview, but when it came to turning the talking into action they were not as good. I acknowledged the evaluation error with my manager, and we agreed that such an event should not happen again. How? ...


4

I'm going to disagree with the other answers and say that you should go above and beyond and try to figure out how this person was hired. The thing is, when someone like this is hired, you fundamentally have 2 choices: You can help them. This requires, as you've noted, hours and hours of time essentially dictating code and being a programming teacher ...


13

Fundamentally, the most proactive step you should take is to have a conversation with your manager and explain all this. They may decide to get involved and verify your assessment. In any case, you can ask for their advice. You have been given a subset of responsibility of a manager. That does not mean you can decide to go off and restructure the hiring ...


99

Interviewers/Hiring Managers are human - and as such they aren't going to get it right all the time. This means unfortunately that the occasional person gets hired (or accepted for an internship) who really shouldn't have been. We don't know whether the candidate lied about their experience to the interviewer but from what you've said here: claiming to be ...


3

Give her the raise. Don't do anything else regarding how she went over your head. Then figure out why she went over your head. Preferably through your boss if they know, otherwise ask your team member. This is an opportunity for you to do some reflection. Note: I'm not saying you're doing something wrong! But this is a moment to consider whether you actually ...


3

First of all, unless you own the company (unlikely since you have a boss), she's not your employee (you did not employ her, you do not pay her wages), she's your colleague. You just happen to be in a managerial position. Second of all, it is the employee's prerogative to decide when and whom to ask for a raise. Unless expressly specified in the Internal ...


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