New answers tagged

0

You cannot escape labels, and we humans need them as a form of shorthand. What you do is you give the label meaning, or act to earn a different label/nickname. I've had numerous over the years from "the hacker" to "Devil man", to "Loki", and many, many others. If I want to ditch those kinds of labels, the obvious route would be to be less mischievous. ...


8

How should I address the issue and communicate to the boss that I do not appreciate such labeling? Since you have a generic question, I'll provide a generic answer: If you do not like something, speak up. No one is going to read your mind. There's no way you can keep everyone (inducing you) happy. If you don't want to be called X, just have a private chat ...


1

If the label is positive, what’s the problem? Your boss just picked one of your positive attributes to describe you to the group. Same way we pick strong for steel, bright for the sun, cold for winter etc. It would be a really long introduction if he describes you to at a level of precision to fully describe you... or any person for that matter. If you ...


0

The company should replace the CEO. That can simply mean to hire a new CEO to replace him, if he is an employee CEO. Except he is an owner CEO, as common in small companies. It is often the case that the owner or founder of the company "naturally" became CEO when the company was founded. That makes it more complicated, but not fundamentally different. ...


4

I am also considering leaving the company because of this reason Excellent answers already, I upvoted all three. But I don't use any of these strategies, I let others pop their heads up for the group efforts and will watch in interest if they get their heads chopped off or quite happily take any benefits gratefully. There is another angle. Unfairness to ...


2

I'd like to complain to the management about this unfairness without naming people, because unfairness breeds resentment. Is that advisable ? It sounds like you already did complain ("I mentioned the above arguments also, but my request was still rejected.") but it didn't get you anywhere. Repeated complaints aren't advisable. What is the best way ...


1

Unless remote working provisions are built into your employment contract I would be inclined to tread carefully. I've dealt with several companies whose workforce are predominantly remote workers however they've tended to be in the consulting space where collaboration between employees (on internal company objectives) seemed rare. Most employees were "...


2

They are most likely trying to get more people to the office by following a policy of "let's not drive away old timers by taking away their remote time but let's also not allow people who normally work at the office to start going remote" It's not about fairness, it's about strategic goals. Upper management could be more aggressive and risk senior people ...


17

Have a face to face conversation with your boss Your goal is to understand what's happening, not to fix anything (just yet). Once you have the background, you can think about how to fix it, but that's a second step. This is just a fact finding mission. After the intro listen a lot, talk little. Primarily ask open ended question If you describe behavior use ...


-1

he started avoiding me. If he ever had to talk to me, he would talk with an attitude and give me death stares Ignore this and remain friendly and professional, nothing you can do that is guaranteed to have a positive outcome for you. There is no knowing what the problem is, and asking is unlikely to work. I work with people all the time who actively ...


2

You really will need to ask your boss about this. None of us could say for sure as we're not them. My guess is that while they're probably glad that your reputation at work is such that the CEO wants you doing special projects, they're annoyed that you're not available as a resource for the projects they had previously hoped to have you working on.


-1

tl;dr Don't talk to your boss. Don't take the lead on this. Support your coworker if they do in an act of solidarity. It's absolutely important to show solidarity with our coworkers when it comes to issues with management prejudice, along with other social issues that can occur when there is a power imbalance. It's also important to recognize that just ...


6

Before going any further, I suggest that the three of you talk about your expectations for how much time (per week or per month) each of you will put into this project. If you can't come to an agreement on this, there's not much point in going further. Next figure out what work needs to be done. Divide the work into small tasks, and come up with a time ...


4

You have to decide... either this is serious, or it is not. If this is not serious, then 2-3 hours per day is entirely unreasonable. This is the time to try to either back out of the project or convince the person you're in conflict with to downshift it. If this is serious, and you expect it to be a meaningful source of income in the future, then 2-3 ...


2

People react to different things in different ways. People also make the mistake of thinking that people with some similarities share more traits than they actually do. Combine the two and you have your present situation. Of the three of you, it seems that you are taking the incident most to heart. So, you have at least three different viewpoints here. ...


0

So, John says it's not your problem since you may not know the full story and clem says it might affect you, so you should take to your boss. What about the middle way? Go to the boss to discuss it and not mentioning Morgan? Let the boss raise the topic of Morgan if he wants to, but only discuss your own concerns.


11

While I get where it comes from, I disagree with the previous answer saying that you should keep everything to yourself. Morgan might not want you to get in their case, but your worries are that it might happen to you. From your post, I gather that you do not share the same manager as them. Then, approach your manager and make it about you. Mention that ...


7

Sounds like it is Morgan's problem not yours. You may not know the whole story so you should probably keep your nose out of it no matter how well intentioned you are. If you don't like that advice: At least talk to Morgan before getting involved. Morgan may not want you involved. < edit > I've re read the question and all of the other answers. I think ...


3

I did something similar once. I had personal problems with my project manager, and he was also one of the reasons I left. Could that be the case for you? But because everybody else knew, everybody else could prepare, and I actively managed knowledge transfer, so the rest of the team wouldn't suffer. Even my department head was informed, so he had the chance ...


11

Until you've received a resignation letter from the employee I would recommend that you continue to manage them as per normal. That means, if they underperform then you may need to reprimand them as appropriate. If they under perform in a major way or do something grossly unprofessional then you still have the ability to terminate them but be very careful ...


1

Why do you even care?! They can criticize all they want, just as long as they also PR good, valid fixes. As others said, the code they're fixing is what got the money to hire them in the first place. You might want to remind them of that. Daily. Seriously though, let them complain their heart out, write a page long commit messages, the whole shebang. Just ...


1

Deliver the outcome management want. Picking the method is your job. You're the team lead, you're in charge of coordinating your team to produce the outcome that management want. In this case, they want to be sure knowledge sharing is happening systematically between staff. It's your job to deliver that outcome in the best way. They might have suggestions ...


1

Can you cause damage as an admin? Through customizing one can cause real harm to clients/your company, its nature depending on the system. Imagine the admin rolling out his account info to your VPoS terminal. Will the service still work perfectly? Yes. Will the company get its money? No. Even an honest mistake can invalidate a full testing cycle and trash ...


1

First, be assured that you are not forwarding to the wrong direction. Is pairing an effective strategy for non-programming related tasks? This is called delegation & cross-functioning. You & team had done great efforts to make great software but only team knows it best. Other business functions like support, marketing, accounting also needs to ...


0

Good answers already. There is one other thing to contemplate in these sorts of situations. Your boss is slowly digging a hole. He may soon just leave, quite possibly he is actively job hunting. There is potentially an opportunity if the scenario is right for advancement. So look closely at what could be done to make yourself look like a good candidate for ...


8

Is pairing an effective strategy for non-programming related tasks? That's not your call. It's whatever management decides it is. They're the ones with theoretically the knowledge and specific experience to make the call. And yes, it is a reasonable way of spreading knowledge and pooling resources.


1

Have there been studies around pairing on admin/configuration tasks? Not studies, but for one thing, this would help mitigate the problem of an admin hoarding the passwords to critical systems, or being lazy with security.


50

I have some experience with this from the other side. We did not have much pairing when rebuilding our Kubernetes infrastructure recently. The person who built most of the new infrastructure is now on parental leave every other week for the rest of the year. Every time they are gone we have to scramble to solve problems. This means we are losing development ...


20

I think you are focusing to much on the term in a programming sense. By working with another, you can teach and learn from each other. For example, early in my IT career, I was a sales engineer for a software product. I was "paired" with a salesperson. We would travel to potential customers to sell them the product. He focused on selling and I focused ...


2

Your boss is feeling bitter and burned. This is apparently the core of your current issue. So, try to help that as best you can. The first thing you can do is go to your boss, and ask what you can do to help. It's a nontrivial emotional lift, but talking with him, listening to him, and being supportive will likely help at least some, and it's highly ...


9

This is a battle that is being fought way above your paygrade. The only thing you can really do is talk to your boss in private, preferably after work, offsite. Remember, what you are seeing are the results of disputes you have not seen. Maintain your course, and try to bring as much of a positive attitude as you can muster, make changes where you can, ...


5

My boss is motivated but is no longer engaged and suspects he is losing his job and this is making everyone feel unhappy, what can I do? Do your job, to the best of your ability. Part of your job is to help your boss do his by providing any work related information (ie Systems is running slow due to XYZ and I fixed it before it was noticed ). Factual ...


1

In software companies, the work of product management has some high rungs on the ladder. You can learn about it with tutorials from an outfit called "Pragmatic Marketing." In general, there are two paths up the ladder. One is the "principal engineer / distinguished engineer / CTO" path. The other is the supervisory ladder. In either case, let your ...


3

They can get over it. That code they’re criticizing is the same code that opened up the opportunity that required additional developers to be hired (aka them). Without it, there’s no reason for them to be there. Short story is that developers are there to improve the code (same story everywhere else). If it’s not doing something that it should be, to make ...


1

To move forward, I suggest a strategy meeting with you and the other two developers. The objective should be to plan the next phases. There are at least three things that need to be covered: Any new features that are needed. Cross training. Bringing the early quick-out code up to full production quality. Topics should include how to balance work on these ...


0

The strategy I have seen successfully used the most is to get management certification. Invest in yourself and take a course. You'll learn what is generally involved if nothing else. And you get a chance to do some networking. You may well find it's not to your taste, it's a very different role.


0

Get them together for a little talk. Tell them like it is: You put this code together quickly to get the company to a point where it would get funding which is used to pay their salaries. Without the code they are complaining about, they wouldn't be working there. Tell them: If you don't like it, fix it. Quietly. Without complaining to me. PS. If they ...


1

Agree with the answer by @PeteCon. You might be going into a defensive mode, because it is your code and somewhat a reflection of your skill. You say, there is no regard to the constraints you were facing at the time of writing, but that does not really matter. Bad code is bad code. If you created something functional, but not maintainable, then there is ...


3

I doubt the climate would improve if you told you take these criticism personally and you would like them to stop, nor if you did escalate the matter. You could gain that they stop criticizing openly, but that will not change what they may think and will be detrimental to your relationship as colleagues. Criticizing the other developer's work is being ...


27

You made a tactical decision to accept some technical debt in order to deliver a finished product which was functional. You worked from a blank sheet of paper, and made something which is good enough that clients and investors want to use it. Take pride in that - it should be one of the first lines on your resume. Now the system is growing in maturity. You ...


3

Preface: There is no "this one weird trick to climb corporate ladder, 100% effective money-back guarantee". "Climbing the ladder" means gradually take more and more responsibility, managing more risks, being involved in more projects. The scope of work is like a cone on its' nose, it gets wider as you get higher. You seem to be concerned with lack of ...


1

I think no one has addressed the below so far: people focus on "don't" (which I fully support) or focus on some coding practices. If you cannot fully abolish unpaid overtime (as it comes from above), what can you do? Can you provide flexible working hours? "Guys and gals, I know, we need to clock 80 hours a week, but in my team you can come and go when you ...


1

Responding to your first update: On the other hand if it is Sunday but we are at office work overtime, how much time is acceptable to use social media? On a Sunday? I would say at least eight hours is acceptable. Though I would hope that they would get bored sooner than that! To begin with, why don't you make weekend work more fun? You all have to ...


2

Q1. How to create ownership in technical teams? That's the question of the century. In my experience (which is mine and may not be universal) teams seldom take ownership, even when there's the impression they do, they don't. Individuals within the teams do take ownership. If you're lucky and have a great team, all or most members will, if you have a non ...


2

You are a manager of a team of 15 at a remote location and communication with headquarters are bad, partly because of a language barrier, partly because of other reasons. So far, so good, that can happen. From what you wrote, your team's performance is suboptimal because of this problem (e.g. changes from headquarters that you don't understand or can't all ...


2

Answering this bit specifically: sometimes I observe that my team-members don't work as focused as they should because we all know we need to work overtime again What's probably happening here is that they've realised that they're not just in the office until a few bugs are fixed, but that they're stuck there for however many hours senior management has ...


5

Culture Problem I think Karl Bielefeldt's answer is the best one, but I would like to state it even more forcefully: you have a culture problem, and it has nothing to do with China. Your boss wants bugs in your software fixed? Awesome!!! There are countless times in my career when I wanted to prioritize bug fixing, but management wanted more feature ...


30

Your job as a team lead / manager is to shield those in your team from the rubbish that comes from above so that they're productive. You need to find out WHY they're having to work overtime. Are they being generally unproductive, or are the timelines unrealistic? If they're unrealistic, then you need to take steps to make them realistic... Get the team ...


3

Are you using a formal process? I'm guessing from the contextual clues and your other question that you are a) building software and b) in China. 'a' is relevant, 'b' may not be, but keep in mind I'm coming from a United States/Canada perspective and there may be cultural/learned behaviors that affect the viability of my suggestions or require adapting them. ...


Top 50 recent answers are included