New answers tagged

0

I'm going to give you an answer for one specific facet of your question: that they can't replace you. Nope. You're not irreplaceable. It simply doesn't work like that, no matter what you might think. I know this, because I was that replacement once. I was hired to be the "Corporate Apps" person at a company. 'The' is the right word there - I was being ...


1

It's interesting that among all those answers from the manager, there was nothing like "If you stay here, we'll give you a promotion or at least a raise of ". That tells you right away how much they do (or don't) value you. If you're not worth a measly 10% (or whatever other amount that's not insignificant) raise to them, then why do you worry so much about ...


0

An old saying where I live says something like 'everybody is useful but nobody is indispensable': they will replace you. Also, this does not need to be a negotiation, there is no need to explain or expand on any issue, reason, whatever. Be kind but firm and just hand them your notice, fulfill it to the letter working hard or even harder and that's it. ...


0

Unfortunately your situation is not a medical emergency. Its unfortunate, but I think you'll need to manage as best you can with OTC painkillers until you can get treatment. Leaving, especially if you're the only salesperson in the store may result in you getting fired. It would be nice of your employer to let you go and get treated immediately, but I don'...


9

Go to the dentist and have your wisdom tooth fixed Inform you boss in writing (e-mail) that you are unfit to work and need to take care of this. Do this as soon as possible Have the doc write a note that you were in no shape to go to work and how long you will need to recover before you can do your job again. Send copy of this note to your boss (photo by e-...


0

They are trying to sell you on the benefits of a startup, which are valid - being lead person when there’s growth does mean a chance at a lot more opportunity than you’ll have at a “desk job”. But there are downsides too, and you are wanting something more traditional where you can learn more from others, that’s fair. I had a friend recently leave a just-...


0

Let's break this down a bit, to the points your manager made: Our company will grow a lot, we're aiming to do stuff which other companies are doing not so good! Almost all companies aim to grow. Your manager has no idea what other companies are aiming to be doing in a year, or how well they'll be doing them, so this is unsubstantiated. In my opinion ...


16

You don't owe them anything after the end of your employment, and it's not your responsibility to teach them that. Hand in your resignation, work professionally during your notice period, and then move on to the next opportunity. You're leaving a job, it's perfectly fine to do that, and you'll do it many more times during your career.


7

They are playing the guilt card pure and simple. They are not always to be believed, you only have to read several other posts on here that say “I was promised X... and it never happened” The CEO gives the excuse well the market did not pan out... So, you need to focus on your aspirations and reasons and make the move best for you. Ignore the guilt card...


1

Focus on limiting damages, and getting the project back on the best footing possible. You really want to walk away from this project by the end of it being able to demonstrate that you improved the course of the project after you stepped up to greater authority over it. Consider how the world views pilots after emergencies: Pilots who land an aircraft ...


4

It is useful to remember that, as a manager, part of your job is to maximize company profits or other goals. For example, if the current plan will generate $10.000 losses, but you think you can bring it down to $5.000 losses, you just "made" $5K for the company. There is no need to change your behavior significantly because the project is "failing". As ...


4

I don't believe that I can save the project. I may be able to execute a solution that prevents our company from being penalized by a contractual obligation. If the situation is dire then it would be best to be clear about that the moment you take the project (if not before). You say you believe you can't save the project completely. However, you say you ...


5

There's multiple factors here that are working against you in this situation, some are things you can control (if you choose) and others aren't: You're having an effect on people's finances that the perceive negatively: I noticed that previously before I joined, the claims for mileage, annual leave etc, has been processed daily.. but when I came in, I ...


-1

I think, like has been mentioned, going back with a solution is always better than pointing out problems. In this case Git is great for source code management, however you may want to use it for something which it was not really designed for. Maybe you can use something like Artifactory (or something similar) as this is for the result of your build process,...


2

Right now, you are arguing with your boss about abstracts. About the future, which is hard to predict. Convincing someone your prediction of the future is going to come true has been a challenge for millennia :) It's easier to argue based on facts. So if you think there is something in the future that will go wrong, simulate it. I assume you are a ...


-2

I don't think it's particularly wrong in this case to check in some dlls, specifically the ones generated from licensed compilers. And I don't see where is the big mistake that the company will be paying for. Having said that you should propose to follow best practices, instead of pointing fingers at them being "wrong", because they are not. For example, ...


-4

Nothing wrong with committing binary files. The versioning system is there for you to commit anything reasonable for the project. Compiled binary files on versioning for a private team is more than reasonable. There's no need to convince your boss for something that's working. Your boss made the right decision.


13

A general rule is: Don't go to your boss with problems, go to him or her with solutions. [1] Saying "this is a bad idea, if we do it we'll be sorry in a year" isn't helpful. What you need to do is to come up with an alternative plan that avoids the problem while also accomplishing the goals of the problematic one. In your case I assume it would be some ...


0

How to convince my boss not to commit binary files and assets to git? I feel you have already done your part. Further convincing or pushing him with more arguments isn't going to automatically change the situation. I wonder if I should insist. If I should, what would be good technical arguments? Refrain from insisting anymore at this point. Maybe there ...


2

As your employer has indicated that there there are no part-time options available to you and you feel that a full-time return to work may be too much for you at the moment you should look into Employment and Support Allowance and Universal Credit which you may be eligible to claim. Do this before your SSP runs out, I think it lasts for 28 weeks if I recall ...


9

I was signed off work about 5 months ago In the UK health system, if you are signed off (i.e. your doctor has ticked the box saying you are not fit for work), you should be revisiting your doctor so they can sign you back on (i.e. the line will say you are fit for work as of the stated date). Here is the doctor's line: The doctor will likely have crossed ...


3

Startups in particular need the ability to pivot rapidly, and tend to work on very tight budgets, so can't guarantee you'll get training in anything specific or at any specific time. To be successful in a startup you need to be able to pick up technologies on your own initiative, and regularly get out of your comfort zone. "Since there was lot of work ...


1

So the team lead in the USA (who apparently calls the shots) didn't like your work. What didn't he like? Do you see a way of improving yourself, based on his feedback? It's not easy to deal with negative feedback. It's something you need to learn when working in a team, and your company's goals don't always align very well with your own, personal goals. ...


9

Both sides made mistakes, but it won't help you that your employer made mistakes. Often small or young companies are not good at training new hires. You should have learned during your free time in the office. You joined in January and you are stating yourself that you didn't have much to do, then why didn't you start looking at documentation and ...


0

I fully understand that you are reluctant to bring it up with management and that the way this is presented is important in how it is percieved. My view is that even though you think this is a personal issue, for the company this is a problem with the team. I would there suggest that you do not make an exceptional effort but instead look into the existing ...


2

I work in cybersecurity as an security analyst / engineer. I will start by expanding on one of the points that Jay brought up in his post - First do not assume actions by Bill are malicious. From my experience in researching and managing security incidents on the security operations team at my company, most incidents occur not because an employee has ...


2

Let’s be honest, you can report Bill anonymously but you work for a small organization. I would expect word to get around. I would document your concerns and take it up the chain of command. Bill is not a team player. If coworkers ask you to explain why you reported Bill you are under no obligation to explain. If you choose to explain a simple answer ...


2

You should consider both talking to your colleague and alerting your manager, or the organization's cyber risk manager. Cyber risk is a serious concern of any reasonably informed organization. You'll risk your relationships with your colleagues by handling the situation unprofessionally or indelicately, not by reporting your concern alone. Keep the ...


4

In theory, when you talk about such things to your manager, or IT or HR or whoever in your company is responsible, it's their obligation to not mention your name to the person you're reporting about. Whether they will actually stick to that... only God knows. So, it could happen that you do everything by the book and that the manager still tells Bill that ...


1

I know this question is old and a lot of great answers have been posted. However, as the OP, I want to post my experience with this since I do have the experience to back it and I thought it would be relevant and might surprise some people. Just an FYI update, I have changed jobs since then. I took the advice and didn't tell my manager. Things went up and ...


0

According to OSHA, you have a right to refuse unsafe work. However, as @MisterPositive suggested, you can (and should according to the regulation) absolutely ask your employer for the right tools. This is part of your duty to: Ask your employer to correct the hazard, or to assign other work.


0

You are not given the right tools (gloves, dust mask, etc). You probably need to look at OSHA Regulations. The issue isn't that it's unrelated to your job description, it's that it's a safety hazard. There's contact information on their site you can use to ask questions and find out what your rights are. You are asked to remove floor tile from an office. ...


3

Can you refuse this task? Yes you can. You can also most likely be terminated too. Take a look at your employment contract, employee handbook, etc. Most companies have this little clause "and other duties as necessary" that is designed to be a catch all for other miscellaneous crap the company may need you to do. You might want to check with your ...


4

I want to address a facet of your question: But during this time I voluntarily started contributing in another Team-B. Eventually over a period of a year, I was the one who developed almost all parts of the solutions. But this Team-B hired a new employee and made him owner of the solution I developed. You should not get upset at this. This is what ...


3

You asked, What should I do now To be perfectly blunt, I think you answered your own question a few sentences before that: my new manager started pushing me to work for the architect team again When at work, you should do what your manager tells you to do. Unless they're directing you to do something illegal or otherwise inappropriate, which doesn't ...


15

First of all, just because it's work for the other team, doesn't make instructions from your manager any less valid. Which you may know, but I want to get out there. You say you were never appreciated or compensated. Well, appreciation is nice, but you shouldn't get extra compensation, unless you did this outside of your regular working hours. If your ...


0

I've seen obsession with checklists where I work as well. I suspect it starts when some manager reads an article in HBR or some in-flight magazine and sees how it works great for airline pilots, astronauts, and surgeons and is then eager to implement it at work with the expectation that checklists can make their own operations as predictable and tame as ...


0

For stuff like this I've normally seen some type of escalation path. Tier 3 would be a help desk or junior DevOps functions. They would They would handle most issue resolution or recurring tasks. Checklists would be something like "If this happens then blah, blah. If this does not resolve the problem then escalate to Tier 2". Tier 2 would handle more ...


0

I won't go on at length about how this is misguided because that's not your fault, but just for the record this is why development teams shouldn't shift off app support to "lower skilled" teams, because if it's a "routine" problem they should fix it in the software to eliminate the toil and if it's an "advanced" problem you need an engineer to figure it out. ...


1

Make checklists of the most common faults/fixes. Things that require more product knowledge: "..contact the software manufacturer/forum for more info".


2

"they are refusing to accept the handover unless/until it can all be documented" Is it feasible to document "everything"? I put everything in quotation marks you are trying to deal with a silly request. One option is to give a sensible response (i.e. just do good documentation) and apply a silly label it to fit the silly wording of the original request. ...


3

how to communicate that not everything can be part of a “checklist”? Some ideas listed below, but ultimately, you may need to push back, and be more assertive. They may not really know what they are asking for, but figure as long as they keep asking, you'll just keep on giving. You may have to stop playing the game. You may also need to do a reality check ...


8

You're asking "How to communicate that...", but the problem here is not one of communication. The other side understands what you want to say anyway, they just don't want it. Saying it again or in a different manner won't change anything. There are two errors in this process: Work that can only be handled by more skilled people is pushed to less-skilled ...


3

One thing to remember in these kind of meetings is, that the CEO is not talking to an employee if he or she is answering your question. The answer isn't even adressed to the group of people it concerns. The CEO is talking to the whole audience. But more importantly you are talking to the audience as wellnot only to your CEO. So if you critizise in these ...


1

Leave it alone. It's worth pointing out that neither you nor your partner actually has anything to give to the police. You've no evidence, save for a second-hand description from someone else that would not be involved in the report, and no clear demonstration that your partner was harmed by the accountant in any way (there was clearly a business case for ...


4

I propose two-step process: Ask non-sensitive question: "CEO, what is the best way to discuss sensitive topics?" Using information from (1) bring up sensitive topics The theory is that you ask about process first, because it seems there is no process right now. There are some suggestions, but not expectations. As others answered, it is not useful to bring ...


7

Maybe I am too cynical. The main goal of this meeting is to keep all informed about relevant news regarding the company and to have a dialog between the CEO and the employees. No, it isn't. In practice it is a [monologue] from the CEO, who always tells how good everything is. Yep, like I said. Last time a manager told us that we should talk ...


5

So is it a good idea to talk about workplace improvements at all? If no one else, including your manager, is willing to bring up these topics then why should you put yourself at risk? It sounds good in theory, but I would not be the first person to ask the CEO a question that might make them look bad or feel uncomfortable. How can you start talking ...


0

Much of what you've stated seems to be subjective, unless you can prove your points with factual evidence. Example: I suspect that the accountant suggested redundancy for my partner, as she was the only other employee who had access to the accounts, and so her main 'threat'. This redundancy caused my partner some considerable financial and emotional ...


8

Look at the potential costs vs the potential gains when you make your decision. You stand to gain: The satisfaction of taking retribution against someone who hurt your partner. The comfort of knowing you've done everything you could to expose this person's ethical bankruptcy. However you shouldn't rule out the risks and potential costs - she will ...


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