New answers tagged

1

Honestly, this seems to be a fairly common experience for early career jobs. I've been in the same position, and I found it disheartening. The trick is - just learn some stuff. You probably paid lots of money for your university degree - and now you're being paid to learn! Now I found myself feeling guilty for working on stuff that 'wasn't strictly ...


2

Is looking for a new job at this time a good choice right now as I feel I have been almost put on bench in my company? Not until you fix your productivity problem. Your current company knows you can be better than right now and it's lockdown related. They are probably willing to move you back to projects after the lockdown. Your new company however will see ...


8

It's not clear why you don't like this role. If you think it will look bad on your CV, think again. Imagine reading: I handled all the most important and top priority customer requests. That sounds like an important person whose valuable time is not spent on fixing typos or changing background colours. If you think you won't learn much, and there isn't ...


-1

Some of the other answers here are very good, but one aspect they don't touch on is severance payments. Since you are located in China, you should be aware that Chinese labor law is very much in favor of the employee, and that if you fire the employee the company is legally required to pay him severance, as well as giving him 30 days advance notice. The ...


0

I don't intend to keep him As you've noted, it's easy to see people's behaviour change when they've got one foot out the door. It's entirely; possibly he also realizes you don't want him and isn't willing to bust ass anymore. If they're doing the job, I'm not sure what the problem is here. People don't leave jobs. They leave bosses. Ask yourself why ...


8

Have a direct conversation with your colleague. You have a better chance of having mis-interpreted the situation than having correctly guessed your colleague's intentions - even if experience suggests otherwise. Instead of guessing the intentions and feelings of your colleague, engage them in a caring and direct conversation: If you're intent on letting ...


23

If you are well prepared to lose a person, what would be needed? You are evidently a developer given you Stack Overflow profile. If turnover in China is anything like it is in North America (developers last 1-3 years on average), losing developers is a common occurrence and something most teams should be prepared for. The key questions to answer: Do they ...


111

You're reading a lot into his behaviour. Sure, those could be signs he's about to quit, but they are more general signs of unhappiness. It could mean trouble in his personal life, dissatisfaction with his job that's not bad enough to quit over, poor mental or physical health, or something else. Unless his performance is falling below acceptable, then as a ...


0

Sounds like you need to bring this to your managers attention ASAP and let him decide what to do. It always pays to have a few suggestions up your sleeve on how to proceed regarding the unsigned contract. The headcount issue is a rectifiable one, but the sooner this is brought to your managers attention, the sooner this can be resolved. Be sure to let them ...


-1

Two things should help you. Although it will take some persistence from you over few weeks. Give him the feedback 1:1. Call a meeting with agenda clearly mentioned and tell him politely. "I really like the advice you give me. At the same time I want to let you know that at times it does not remain a dialogue between us and may keep me away from being more ...


-1

You should change the question to get a different answer My day job actually offered BEST Instruments seminars around different communication styles to address this kind of friction. Your boss’ communication style is “technical” while yours seems to be “bold.” While ideally both parties will “flex” to meet the other’s style, as the one initiating the Q&...


-1

Before the following: if it exists ask your worker representation at your company I think there should be some clarification on where the conflict could going. I would send a mail (BCC HR, and CC her boss) - take care that no information on you being gay is contained like: My sexual orientation is personal information. You obtained knowledge in your ...


0

You are there for your technical expertise so start saying it - the next time the boss launches into one of those anecdotes you reply to it "obviously not salting passwords was terrible, that's why those guys aren't here now and I am". Use it as an opportunity to show how things have developed. The boss gets to keep telling the story but you mitigate the ...


0

Regardless of the power dynamic, there is absolutely nothing wrong with putting your hand up slightly and saying "Thanks, that's exactly what I needed." Often monologuers (apparently not a word) are going on because they think you don't know the full story and need it. If this is a common behavior, it is probably likely they've been "cut short" a number of ...


0

I have encountered such people in my workplace a few times. They are good people and its actually their personality trait to go in the over explaining mode. I think sometimes you can avoid such lengthy discussion by finding the answers yourselves but other times you have to still ask the questions from same people. I think you can just wait for the moment ...


-1

Such people are more common than one might think, though the amount of talking they do varies. For some, it's an escape from work they don't want to do by spending time talking to you instead. That way they can feel like they are doing something productive, while not actually doing something. Others like to hear themselves talk, possibly so they can feel ...


0

Is it worth addressing or just dropping / learning how to deal with it? Learn how to deal with it. He is your boss and the owner of the company. If he feels that your time is best spent listening to his answers to a question that you asked him then you need to accept that. Let him determine what the most productive use of his employees' time is. He is, ...


3

Yeah, it can be frustrating. Also the opposite is frustrating, which is when there is assumed knowledge, and the answer is very terse. What you could try is book-ending the question. For example: Instead of: What does XYZ stand for? Ask: It looks like data flows from Foo in XML format, then into XYZ, which then seems to convert it into JSON, ...


0

If your boss has to resort to anecdotes it probably means that they are not confident and do not know the details of your work or how to handle the situation effectively. Hence, they are trying to act in a situation which they find difficult themselves. My advice: change team if this is leading you feeling angry/frustrated. Changing another person is much ...


5

Does your boss understand the technical side at all? From the hashmap example and the casual acceptance of the SQL query form, I am guessing that your boss doesn't actually have a strong technical background. There is no competitive advantage to not hashing passwords from the beginning. Most frameworks build it in from the start. The only reason for it ...


2

......so I could avoid most client meetings as I hate dealing with insane requests You agree that the clients’ requests are absurd which means they are not technical. Your CEO is also a non-technical person and uses technical terms or technologies to impress those above mentioned clients. So let’s be honest here: As long as you are dealing with these ...


2

If your boss is the company owner, tell her about the feedback you received, like the one saying you were trying to scam them. Tell her that she is telling anecdotes showing total incompetence. If she is not the company owner, tell whoever is above her that she kills sales. Or you can pray that she pitches to a client who doesn’t just quietly go away with ...


53

"Scrappy and homey" is a good thing for a mom-and-pop store.. It is a very bad thing for a company required by law to have due diligence. Make it simpler for her. This isn't that you have a difference of opinion on how good the story is. This is her telling potential customers about a time she broke the law. Under GDPR in the EU, both those stories indicate ...


1

He often assigns me small insignificant tasks (minor code refactoring, UI improvements, etc). I always tell him that I'll get to them when I have time, because we all have actual urgent tasks that are requested by our clients or management (and I actually do fix those issues after dealing with more urgent work). However, he keeps nagging me about them, and ...


144

You're the most senior developer, time to act like it. To stop playing charades in a meeting would be a good start. If your boss is bringing you along, you need to bring your expertise to the table. I can't believe how lucky you are that you have feedback from potential clients and investors. That should have been given to your boss as you received it. In ...


3

Your description is very thorough but there are some questions that you could answer to help formulate an answer. Like for example: How many people in your company? I'm assuming that if you're all working remote then the team is rather small. I also work in a software company that is mostly remote and some of the team dynamics are quite challenging, ...


130

Not one pitch has succeeded when she has used the anecdote and I have to deal with potential clients and investors asking me how the heck we can be so careless with medical data. Can you think of any other way to get my boss to stop this? Compile some of the specific feedback you have received from potential clients and investors. Quote them ...


17

Your best shot here is to come up with better stories for your boss to tell. She's not going to stop telling these stories on her own. I suggest you focus on making moves that improve the security of your app and make it easier for your clients to use it securely. Every time you make an improvement, brag about it to your boss. Word these updates in a way ...


1

Your supervisor may have already marked the report you submitted, so reuploading may make no difference. It will probably be time-stamped, so it will be obvious if he does check, and he's told you not to, so don't. If you give a presentation in the future, it's OK to talk about new information or corrections but you should make it clear that it is a change ...


1

You submitted late - this implies poor planning. Your supervisor has been generous in allowing a late submission, although you don’t mention if there are any penalties. Why would you expect to be able to change a submission at all, whether late or not? Your supervisor has clearly told you that you cannot make changes. When you present be careful of ...


11

Situations like these are often negative feedback loops. Bad practice and (unreasonable) technical challenges lead to significant development issues and obstacles. Significant development issues and obstacles lead to (good practice) developers leaving the project High turnover rates means the work is mostly done by developers who are new to the codebase. ...


6

You have a retention problem that you need to fix. But what can you do about it in the meantime... As other answers indicate, documentation can be handy. However, it sounds like your team is barely keeping its head above the water, so I'm not sure if you'll find the time. You categorise the team as having a culture problem. I think you're jumping to ...


3

I agree with KIlisi, but would like to be more specific: highlight knowledge transfer and move to use more written communications Start writing as many things down as possible, including specs, How Tos and such. In stable teams there are some piece of information that are not written down, but the chance of retrieval is higher than in highly fluid team. ...


6

How can a project with high turnover be stabilized even as staff change? Prioritise documentation as a start, then build from that. With good documentation you can mitigate somewhat against staff turnover. Without it you're digging a bottomless hole.


1

Here are two things you might try Strategize to live with it. You could assume that this is going to happen and build it into your strategy. Sort your engineers by those you will keep and those you will lend away. Spend your effort training those engineers while using the giveaway engineers for lower priority tasks that can be more readily dropped at any ...


1

This sounds to me like something that was said during some sort of debate where the developer is angry or frustrated for not being told something that they (probably quite rightly) needed to be informed about before a work item was done, but wasn't. There are definitely better ways to frame the argument however. Consider the setting. If that was written ...


-2

I don't know what constitutes an "adversarial statement" in your region of the world or what consequences such a statement has. But I can tell you why the executive is so angry about what you said or wrote: Developers need to be informed the scope, timelines, and other expectations that are material to the success of needed changes. This is not a ...


0

If the input overlaps on active work and conflicts, it is not likely your job to juggle that. If you find it is your informal job, if it were me, I would muddle through until one of them advances past the other or seek employment elsewhere. Less long-term approach: You may consider requesting a meeting if the scope or problem statement from the two ...


1

“Developers need to be informed the scope, timelines, and other expectations that are material to the success of needed changes.” More just a statement of fact. the scope Say that you said you told a chef you wanted "egg for breakfast." You might end up with anything from a single soft boiled egg (3 min to make) to a full omelet. Why? Because you made ...


1

I'll give you some background from an unrelated field first. Please bear with me. My SO works in a refinery, when she needs an electrician for a project or change, there's an Excel sheet somewhere that states an efficiency factor. I just looked, it's 0.3. That means that for a job that would take 2 hours, her project will be billed 2h/0.3. The field next to ...


6

I will address the question directly. OP says: She also does the same thing in a meeting when we go to the big boss: ideas belong to me and then she asks in front of everyone, "Do you agree with me?" I do that all the time when working with my boss, or my students, or my collaborators. When I ran the meeting, I ask questions on ideas and plans, present ...


4

Lately due to COVID-19 we all are working from home and my Manager is at the peak of Micromanaging since I believe I am the only one now in the team whom she manages since we have one 1 person in the team and that's me. I don't know why you decided to convey you are in a one-person team in this way, but it is too glib for a workplace setting. I know this ...


-1

(I'm going to assume you have some sort of leadership position in the team, and the members are accountable to you in some way.) Don't ask for an exact time. The thing you actually want is to understand where the optimisation potentials are. So rather than ask your team-members indirect questions, straight up ask them how you can help them work more ...


1

It sounds like you'll need to encourage a spirit of communication and collaboration to understand the key issues and address them. Some key thoughts: Has everyone has had appropriate Scrum training? Is regular sprint planning occurring, to ensure that all user stories are clearly articulated with testable acceptance criteria and the devs have an ...


0

I've never been a manager before nor do I really know much about software development. How can I investigate why the team is not meeting expectations given my newness to all of this? A good way to start is to talk with people. Talk with the team lead. He likely has some insight. Talk with your boss. Talk with the developers. Talk with the product ...


5

I almost want to vote to close this question because it is so extensively broad, and on the other hand I still feel a significant array of answers may prove fruitful. First, there is no one way to identify why a team is failing. A lot of managers and directors will pull out the one metric that for them indicates the "why". The why isn't any one particular ...


9

So we have slow team velocity, seemingly productive devs, but a project that is not moving forward. I can think of three options here: There is a pile of other work not accounted for on the task board. One of the many issues I have with Agile driven everything is that the board rarely captures much of the work being done. If you look at my project's board ...


2

I have no experience being a software manager, but plenty of experience being managed as a software developer. In my opinion a good manager should do at least the following in your situation and ask the following questions. Check on every developer every day and ask what they are doing. Once every two weeks or twice a week is not enough in this situation. ...


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