New answers tagged

0

In response to the OP's edit : I had a chat with the previous director and I am told the 24 hour notice policy was brought in temporarily with a view to curb this behaviour. This had failed miserably and everyone forgot to roll this policy back or to address this issue at its roots. This policy almost certainly is deeply resented by staff (as has been said ...


2

As this is sounding very Australian, here's my suggestion: Check the award as to what the On-call allowance is; Decide whether that is worth having an on-call roster; Consider offering some of the casuals full/part-time positions; Set an upper threshold for unpaid sick days (e.g. a maximum of 10 unpaid sick days); Make sure you're keeping records; Contact ...


1

It's a restructure but a dangerous one for you, especially as you are discouraged from applying for the position, which basically says he's either not confident in your abilities to expand what you're doing now, or he has someone specific in mind already (pretty common). It could be a retrenchment where the boss is contemplating replacing two region heads ...


1

I suggest creating a designated list of spare employees on a rotating basis. Also create it 2 months out into the future at least so people can make plans around it. The people on the list will know they might have to come in to work. Giving them 2 months or more advanced notice allows people to swap days with other people when they need it.


5

How do people in other centers or industries manage this? I know folks with kids and I pass by at least two daycares on a regular basis, so I can tell you some of what folks here have been doing. Unfortunately, the first is the thing you don't want to do: Exceed government requirements for the educator-to-child ratio. Have a few teachers that float between ...


2

How do people in other centers or industries manage this? Rostering a casual worker always before hand and hiring extra staff are very cost prohibitive. The day care center I'm familiar with manages it this way: they have a large pool of casual workers to call on if someone gets sick. If they had only one person to choose from it would be unlikely that they ...


0

I feel there are a few ways to handle this, probably throwing the policy out of the window might be a good start. If there's a policy, some are following it, and if there are no 'punishments' for breaking it is not in-place, then you're punishing the employees who are loyal. "We have about 20 staff working and have at least 4 of them randomly messaging ...


1

One simple adjustment you can make is explaining the issue to your staff and asking them to message you earlier if they suspect they may not be able to make it Monday. Most people will take a "wait and see" approach, even if they were sick Friday night, all the way through Saturday, when it comes to Sunday they will be hoping they will get better, ...


2

First: Reach out to upper management, and see what tools are available Can you you hire an extra person? This would give you margin to work with. Can you preemptively ask on Friday for 2 casual staffers to come on Monday just so the 4 missing ones are already sorted out? Can you offer a bonus to employees who use less sick days or gives good advance before ...


1

There are really 2 cases here: Either you believe there is an abuse of the system or you do not. If you do: Provide a carrot-or-stick system for your employees to have them abuse the system less. The carrot might not actually be achievable; rewarding people for not being sick is more or less a lottery, because you never know when you might e.g. twist an ...


5

As other Answers have stated, you don't want to change your policy to make it more strict, especially during the current pandemic. This will only make things worse, not better. Not only will you effectively be trying to get people to work while sick, causing more workers and kids to get sick, but you'll also add more stress, which is well known to compromise ...


1

They want you to resign instead of directly terminating your employment. They have a reason - it can only be guessed at why. Use this to your advantage. Negotiate as to what they will do for you to resign as opposed to firing you outright. Severance pay? Continuation of benefits at employee rates for a period of time? Usage of outplacement resources? Do ...


2

You haven't been demoted. You're retaining your position. He's doing this for another region as well as yours. This is about your boss managing his workload and direct reports. This is an "up level" management change and decision. This is not about you.


3

You're looking at it from the perspective of you. You say that your boss is managing many different people - this is cognitively demanding and means that not every direct report could be getting the attention they need to be managed and utilized effectively. Your boss could just be simplifying his workload, offloading difficult-to-manage tasks to somebody ...


20

I understand the desire of every business to be as efficient as possible with its expenses. But why wouldn't you have an extra person or two scheduled for a few morning hours with option to extend for the rest of the day if needed? This will help with morning rush, and move your potential staffing issues to a day light and not the night when you cant get ...


12

So you have this policy: There already is a policy in place that says staff should inform at least 24 hours in advance - which no one seems to care about and these situations: staff who calls in sick very late in the night the day before. We have about 20 staff working and have at least 4 of them randomly messaging me on a Sunday night (or another weekday ...


-10

Just as a practical tip: I volunteer at a small private school, so the business is similar to yours. There is a list of substitute teachers and every teacher has it. If a teacher is ill (or has a funeral to attend or whatever) and arranges his own substitute, then there's no penalty. If the school admins have to arrange the substitute then there's $100 ...


3

If you need unemployment insurance benefits more than a spotless employment history, then let them terminate you. If you need to control your employment history so that there's nothing to explain from this job, then resign. (If you resign, make the letter short and to the point; disregard the 'forced' part.)


12

Childcare is usually low-paid, low-status work with poor benefits. You're competing in the labor market for employees, and the bargain being arrived at is one in which your employees get the deal they currently, implicitly have: they can take a day off whenever they have the sniffles (=possible covid symptoms, too), and they can also take a sick day whenever ...


82

People tend to wait until the last minute because they don't want to let everyone down by taking a day off. They feel a bit ill and hope it goes away. You should encourage them to call in early to warn you that there might be a problem, without having to make a definite decision. An analogy is that most people know that a ship in immediate trouble should ...


29

Make your employees feel more comfortable about calling off earlier. You said each employee always has a doctor's note? Well, then they probably aren't calling off of work until they are sure that they are sick enough for a doctor to give them a note. If you want this to change, then step 1 is almost assuredly removing the need for a doctor's note. They are ...


213

There already is a policy in place that says staff should inform at least 24 hours in advance - which no one seems to care about, clearly. Because it is completely out of touch with reality. You require what? People to notify you 24h before they get sick? Who are you hiring, child care or supernatural doctors? Imagine I strain my ankle on the stairs on my ...


66

Given the current circumstances, you probably don't want to. Given the current circumstances with the pandemic, you probably don't want to discourage employees from taking a sick day, even if it is on short notice. If your childcare centre becomes a Covid hot spot because an employee decided to come in while sick, that would be really bad for your business, ...


5

The university will ask you to do what's in their best interest. You can be reasonably sure that it's not in your best interest. The only times when you would resign yourself are (1) if you want to leave and they don't want to let you go, and (2) if you did something that exposes you to criminal charges, and you are given the choice of resigning or the ...


12

In the letter, should I write that I was "asked to resign" as the reason for leaving my position? No, just do something along the lines of: "I regret to inform you that I will be resigning my position with [blah place], effective on [mm/dd/yyy]." Keep it as simple and brief as possible. If you are serving a notice period, add that as ...


0

Lying is not in and of itself illegal. Even lying in writing. Some kinds of lying constitute the crime of fraud. Others might be part of a breach of contract that could lead to a civil judgement against your employer. To know if this lie might be either of those, you would need to know the specifics of the contract between your company and your client, and ...


3

Please may I take X days leave on the following dates: That should be all that's needed. (The only reason to phrase it as a question, instead of just "I will be taking...", is politeness. It means the same thing). If for some reason it's not all that's needed, there is a bigger problem than just the leave itself. For example you may wish to ask ...


2

This sounds to me like it's bordering uncomfortably close to contract violation, where in the contract you "give" some number of vacation days, but actually using them is so frowned upon that it's an unwritten rule that you can't use them. It probably doesn't rise to that level legally, but it's uncomfortably close. Question: In your locale, do ...


0

May I suggest that the problem isn't that you may have made some mistake filling out forms etc. etc. The problem is most likely that you are getting a huge bonus, and your boss doesn't like you getting that bonus. Maybe because he doesn't want you to make more money than he makes. That means that when you approach this problem, you don't talk about whatever ...


33

would it be better for me to take my manager's resignation plan or say no and wait for HR to terminate me? Do neither. Don't resign now. Don't just wait around to be terminated. Instead, work hard to find your next job first, then give your notice.


7

Your manager has his own best interest at heart, not yours. So when it is about losing your job, following the manager's advice without checking it very carefully is never a good idea. Here's a possibility: Your manager doesn't like you and wants to get rid of you. All his talks with HR are just made up, and he can't lay you off at all. But if he convinces ...


28

Do not resign. Take your chances. In these Covid times, employers will be more understanding even if you are terminated. Also, as others have pointed out, you may actually be able to get unemployment benefits for being terminated and not for resigning. Finally the point about good recommendation; If he is asking you to resign because of bad performance, then ...


11

Usually in the United States, you are not eligible for unemployment benefits if you have resigned, but you are eligible if you were fired for poor performance. Your manager's claim that you could still claim unemployment benefits if you resign contradicts this, and you should not necessarily believe that he is right about this. Perhaps you are in a unique ...


1

Your manager is at least right that resigning rather than being terminated will look better for you in the future. Jobs may ask whether you've been fired from a position in the last x years, and whether or not the manager actually gives you a "good" recommendation, he'll at least be able to confirm you left in good standing if you resign instead. ...


1

Should I wait for the position to be advertised and then apply for it? Or should I tell the department management that I'd like to progress? What kind of wording should be used? Should I use the outgoing team lead? I have a good relationship with them. Don't wait. Talk to the hiring manager now. Explain why you are qualified, and why you would be the best ...


-3

With any sort of negotiation with an employer, for better or worse the unchangeable bottom line is that the only leverage one has is that one will leave the company if one doesn't get whatever it is one is asking for. Hence, "Jack, I'd like to move ahead to Jane's position when she leaves Friday. What do you think?" If they say no, politely say ...


6

Should I use the outgoing team lead? I have a good relationship with them. This is the best place to start - have a private chat with them and say that you are thinking of applying for their soon-to-be-former role. Ask them what the job entails and whether they think you would be up to it. If they are leaving on amicable terms with the company and they ...


9

Barring some strange circumstances, your direct manager (and likely their manager as well, your second-level) should always know your career aspirations. It is part of their job to help you succeed. Organizations I've been a part of will set up a series of one-on-one discussions between managers and their direct reports to keep in touch with performance ...


8

You don't indicate your location, but denying someone a promotion because they took "too many" days off is probably illegal. Unless you're willing to risk a lawsuit or another legal complaint, please don't do this. There are a few reasons most people take time off: either because they were given vacation time, because they were sick, or because ...


6

Is it common to take into account attendance on a career ladder? No. Many software companies give unlimited time off or 30 days off as a minimum. Typically official HR rules about time off aren't applied to productive tech team members. The manager isn't even tracking sick days because it doesn't matter. All that matters is delivering/solving problems. We ...


23

Measuring a person's value by the amount of leave days they take is beyond idiotic. If people are taking unauthorized absences, that's a different thing entirely. Using leave days as part of a performance review like this is dumb because: A) it has no bearing on what value an employee brings to the company. Your star programmer may have put in how-many hours ...


4

Assuming you don't want to go straight for the nuclear option and want to continue in the job and rebuild the relationship then unfortunately you're going to have to do a bit of the running here. My boss said that i did not give the client the correct solution or complete the necessary paperwork needed. Be honest with yourself - is there any truth to this? ...


-3

The only real possibility here is Be completely blunt and direct. Copy both the boss and ultimate owner of the company. I would probably send a written (printed) signed letter. Short and blunt: "Jill, on (date) you stated that I will not be paid my contractual bonus, due to your anger over the incident with (client). I'm now confirming in writing ...


14

You see how employment works is that they exchange something you want (money) for something they want (work) and if this is something that's part of your job description then at it's most basic you already agreed to that trade. Now you've got a bit of buyers remorse and you want to change the deal, the good news is that sometimes you can do this - but the ...


4

Rather than "hate", try a more positive spin on things: I am happy working on <thing 1> and <thing 2>, but I'd don't enjoy <other thing> so much because <reason>. Would it be possible for us to try <solution> which would mean that <reason> gets better? The point is here rather than just saying "no", ...


3

The most obvious trade-off is that you risk "scaring the horses" by simply bulleting under-performers, and being seen as an assassin. The question is not merely whether you think (or some management metric determines) that a person is underperforming, but whether other workers think the target's performance falls far below the norm or that the ...


8

For most managers, the important question is "would we be better off without this person?" Someone who is working 50% as hard that everyone else is still doing some useful work and if you fire them, that work won't get done - or it'll only get done by sacrificing something else. In theory you can recruit a replacement but that could take months, ...


4

There is plenty of history and opinions on this topic. Jack Welch of General Electric got fame (and controversy) for instantiating a "fire the bottom 10% each year" policy. Some people think it's great while some people think it's stupid. More nuanced discussions are here and here. IMO it's up to the manager to figure out whether a poorly ...


3

What could be the trade-offs between managing under-performers or just letting them go? First of all, it is not at all clear (generally speaking) what under-performers are. The first class of under-performers that I see is the fresh graduates, starting their first job. Should companies not even hire beginners / juniors? Economy would collapse in just a few ...


2

These situations are usually lose-lose. Whatever you do, they have a reason to hurt you. Additionally (unfortunately) there is no easy way out of this, without leaving the company. The bright side If the company is not rotten "by definition", then it might help you to report project problems (and there solutions as you see them) to higher ...


Top 50 recent answers are included