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193

Note down as much detail as you can recall about the private call, and report it to the manager and HR of the company. Calling potential candidate privately is extremely unprofessional, not mentioning in your case it's actually pretty rude and rather naive. You should reconsider if you still want to be onboard with the company according to their response to ...


184

A wiser man than me said “You can make people stay in the office for 80 hours a week, but you can’t make them work more than 40 hours a week.” That’s the problem you are running into, and there’s nothing you can do. People come to the office because you pay them. They work because they want to. And you know why these people have no motivation to work.


59

The way your employer treats people benefits nobody. They might get unpaid overtime from their staff but that is likely to result in poor morale, low quality work and a high turnover of staff (along with the cost/time required to train replacements). In the long term, I think you need to push to change your employer's mindset. They are unlikely to ...


46

Couple of red flags here: How did the "would be" teammate get your personal contact info (unless they had a dedicated copy of your resume which had your contact number)? Even if they had the info, how could they avail that for their "personal" use? If they were against your appointment, why could they not voice that opinion before the interview (especially ...


37

It might be you're trying to win a technical point while your boss is making a business point. You have to understand what his priorities are. Code under test should always return the same value with same inputs It all boils down to one thing: Why are you fighting this battle? Is it because you know you're correct, and are just arguing for the sake of ...


32

Whenever you are denied compensation which you believe that you have earned, you need to consult a lawyer in your jurisdiction. Even though you did break a rule, and were terminated, that might not preclude you from your commissions. The story, as you said it, is very sketchy. The fact that your manager bought you the drinks, which got you fired ...


30

Your job as a team lead / manager is to shield those in your team from the rubbish that comes from above so that they're productive. You need to find out WHY they're having to work overtime. Are they being generally unproductive, or are the timelines unrealistic? If they're unrealistic, then you need to take steps to make them realistic... Get the team ...


28

Getting "furious" over this seems a bit of an overreaction - especially as there's a good chance your boss has simply misunderstood HR policy rather than being malicious. That said - it is also not uncommon for employees/employers to come to an agreement that the employee leaves earlier than their notice period when they are resigning, for various reasons - ...


23

Owner is determining raises based on customer work Well, they can determine whatever criteria they want for raise, does not matter. The real question is: do you think you are getting paid enough (including the raise), based on your work and contribution? Forget you've read about the criteria (which is a restricted or confidential information) Approach you ...


22

If it was me, I'd recommend a couple of things: Get a written commitment of the revised contract Get the pay increase backdated to the original date that it was agreed If I can't get these, I would personally be inclined to start applying for jobs outside again.


22

You've broken the cardinal rule. Never accept the counter-offer of your existing employer. What usually happens is that they'll offer you better terms, but often fire you a few months later on their own timetable. In your case, the COO seems to have taken it up a step further, your employer hasn't given you the promised raise, but still has managed to ...


20

Don't be too quick to turn away the job because of this interaction. You were offered the job by the hiring manager. You received that call from a future coworker (assumed to be subordinate to that manager). If you let this guy scare you off, you're effectively letting him overrule his manager. The manager makes these sorts of decisions for a reason. ...


17

Have a face to face conversation with your boss Your goal is to understand what's happening, not to fix anything (just yet). Once you have the background, you can think about how to fix it, but that's a second step. This is just a fact finding mission. After the intro listen a lot, talk little. Primarily ask open ended question If you describe behavior use ...


14

Should I just leave and let them deal with increasing A/R themselves? Clearly you aren't happy here and have no confidence in your boss, your colleagues, or the company. The word you are using ("undermine", "sabotage", "lies", "office politics", "only got 20 cents", etc) indicate that you don't want to be at your current job Of course this is something you ...


13

As the saying goes, "Politics is the art of saying 'Nice Doggy' while looking for a rock" The only way to avoid the issue is to just respond with positive feedback on everything until you can find employment elsewhere. From what you've posted, they are unwilling to work with you, unwilling to address anything you have brought up, and are generally being an ...


13

I think you're approaching this situation all wrong. This is actually an incredible opportunity. Let me explain why. You seem to really like this company - given that you're going out of your way, worrying about how they view you as an employee. But you also don't feel you're getting your fair market pay - that you could earn more elsewhere. So it'd ...


13

How badly do you need an extra day of pay? If the situation is not "I won't be able to pay my rent and/or feed my children without it" then I don't think there's anything worth being furious about here. You wanted to leave anyway, so just shrug about your former manager's strange behavior and enjoy your day off.


11

Your test does not prove your boss is wrong. Also, for some applications I've worked with, regression on the level of numerical accuracy is unacceptable, I once worked with assertion based on file hashes (where tolerance made no sense), and I've even seen people use "tolerance" to claim a failing test was passing (I'm unsure if the person was oblivious to ...


11

Tell the truth, but be smart about it. Make sure that you don't blame, complain or judge. Make this about business results, not about your emotions. Bad: "I wouldn't like working for ABC since they were dismissive of my ideas". Good: "I'm concerned about the impact on my productivity if I were to work for ABC. I feel I operate best in open and ...


9

If the manager sees you as a threat because you are actually making things happen when she and previous workers under her have not, then you may or may not be able to salvage this job. If it's a decent job other than this manager, it's probably worth a try to salvage it. You need to make sure that she has NOTHING more that she can use against you. Don't ...


8

Is being singled out for termination, and losing commissions to the manager for drinking at lunch with the manager and co-workers ethical? It's probably not very nice and not very ethical, assuming you were intentionally singled out as you wrote. But if you are prohibited from drinking during work and you did it anyway, it's probably within their rights ...


8

This year I accidentally read a memo addressed to HR that a lot of weight will be given to how "billable" an employee is. Would it be better to approach my boss before I'm told my raise, because he decides the amount beforehand. Or, when I likely get a small raise, should I argue my case at that time? In general, it's best to be proactive about ...


8

Should I confront him about this? In comments on another question, you indicated that you are in the United States in Texas. Texas is an at-will employment state. I'm assuming that is still the relevant locale. If you are in the US, in an at-will state, it may not be nice, and it may make you furious, but you can be let go without any notice period at all, ...


7

Show, Don't tell. Come up with different set of test cases, one according to your logic and understanding, and another set with that of your boss. Execute and capture the results. According to your logic the tests will pass, but since your boss's logic is not correct, it'll fail for the different inputs. It'll be made clear then. Also note: Don't make ...


6

There are other ways to increase productivity on bug fixes than just working longer. I would solicit ideas from your team about that and give them time to implement their ideas. Empowerment goes a long way toward morale. For some ideas: Improve testing and get tests to run before every merge. Refactoring of problematic code. Prioritize your bugs so the ...


5

Culture Problem I think Karl Bielefeldt's answer is the best one, but I would like to state it even more forcefully: you have a culture problem, and it has nothing to do with China. Your boss wants bugs in your software fixed? Awesome!!! There are countless times in my career when I wanted to prioritize bug fixing, but management wanted more feature ...


4

I think it depends how badly you want the job. Your teammate should not have contacted you like that, and what was the point!? He should have talked to the manager, not you. I would phone the manager and turn the job down, stating the reasons why you no longer wish to work there. If you desperately need the job you could stay quiet however, this can lead ...


3

Three primary steps: Act professional. Follow a process and document everything. Escalate as necessary. We don't know both sides of the story, but given the description, it seems the manager's behavior is aptly inappropriate. We should focus on finding the reason behind the incident and treat that accordingly. Some pointers (start doing immediately if ...


3

Should I openly tell my manager what I feel? Am I interpreting the above signals wrong? We cannot say, for sure. However, it's too soon to escalate your "observation" to your manager. There are couple of things you should do before you switch to "complaining" mode. Performance hits by decreasing estimates of my work. For example, if the work will be done ...


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