Hot answers tagged

106

You've kind of broken one of the first rules of freelancing. There is an old consultant's rhyme that goes: Roses are red, Violets are blue, Pay me. You've given this person free work long enough that now they expect it. It's time to put a stop to that. I would recommend finishing what is on your plate and telling them that you can't continue until your ...


69

As long as you think that you need good reasons to turn down underpaid freelance work you don't enjoy doing, you will be stuck doing this forever. Your reasons need only be good enough for you. Next time he asks you to make a change or to do something, tell him "My apologies, but that will not be possible." If he starts to argue or tell you why it ...


34

Coming from 30 years in a technical field and very focused on facts I had quite similar feedback a few times. Sometimes even being jokingly called the "Grumpy old curmudgeon". What I found works for me: Feedback is just that, feedback It is my interpretation that makes it negative or positive Negative means there are skill gaps I have that I want ...


29

This is what you should email: You need to pay me all the money you owe me. I need to be paid in full. Until you can make this happen, I'm indefinitely suspending this contract. This has gone long enough. When he starts calling you, you repeat yourself like a broken record, and you say something like: I need to be paid in full now. Do you have my payment ...


16

This would seem to be the result of a junior complaining. I'd take it as a heads up and just be less aggressive with the juniors. Not really that difficult, just watch how you act around them. Be more helpful, spend more time explaining issues, give them more leeway. After all they don't have your experience and drive. An important thing to watch out for is ...


14

How can I moderate my approach and still be seen as influential and assertive? Assertive is maybe not the best thing to focus on for you right now. While it is a good quality in certain contexts, based on your manager's feedback it seems you've crossed the line into being over-assertive. For you, the focus should be on humility rather than assertiveness, ...


9

How do I interpret the latter half of my managers feedback, to consider the possible peer pressure I may be having on junior team members? At face value. It's quite likely that the junior team members feel pressured and sometimes steam rolled by you. Is my reading that I may be overly aggressive reasonable? yes How can I moderate my approach and still ...


9

I want to convey this to him in a professional and diplomatic manner with a SOLID REASON You don't need to convey anything but a bill. One solution which I always use is fairly simple. Whatever eventuates you win. Email him an invoice and request payment politely, then ignore anything that doesn't include payment of it. Do not get into a dialogue about ...


9

In the United States, at least, professionalism usually means you don't give a valid reason. Employers don't give you the actual reason for terminations because, among other things, it could: open them up to lawsuits for possible wrongful termination may disclose sensitive company information (eg. the company isn't doing so great, financially) can give the ...


7

Should I correct her in these meetings? Nope, doing this will most likely back fire, and you can come off as passive aggressive. Generally speaking, you should always discuss a situation with your manager first. Can you imagine if you spoke to your managers boss first, and they speak to your manager about a conversation you had regarding a communication ...


6

Nothing wrong with what you're doing. Boasting about it may come off as arrogant or something else negative, or maybe not... there is no way of telling. What does guarantee you a positive impression is to keep it quiet and then when you do start working you have a good headstart and some of the planning already done. This will make you look very efficient ...


5

Can a company put me on PIP without any notice? Yes Can the company fire me on the basis of my manager's email, especially if I don't refute it? And Yes. They can fire you even if you do refute it. In fact, they can fire you because they don't like the color of the shirt you're wearing. Almost all U.S. States are "at will" states, meaning they ...


5

Do not do it. More specifically, DON'T say anything to NewManager about it. If you do that work to prepare you, fantastic. But: do not commit anything and do not say anything to NewManager at this point. Maintain a professional, serious attitude. Act like a serious professional in the last days of your current role, focussing hard on that. really want to ...


5

How do I quit my present company while ensuring that the formality is fulfilled? If fulfilling this formality, whatever it is, happens at the leisure of your current employer, there's probably not much you can do beyond asking nicely. I just wish things were better documented. And if they aren't, I wish that people would tell me everything that I require ...


4

The thing that I zeroed in on when reading the question was this feedback: opinionated, excessively forceful / aggressive, and dominating It doesn't really matter if this comes from a junior, a peer, or a leader. The end result is the same. Someone perceived you to have these traits. It's easy to dismiss this as someone being too sensitive or "maybe ...


3

It doesn't sound like this person thinks code is worth paying for. It's highly unlikely that you'll ever get paid properly, even when it's live, so every minute you spend on it is a big liability. You said: I seriously want to permanently get rid of him Refusing to do any more work until you're paid for the time you've spent so far should do the trick. ...


3

The main and most convincing reason is that your work has not been paid. Why would you continue spend your time for something that only waste your time and resources. My suggestion would be demand all the outstanding money that you are owed and then resign.


3

I think you should always put yourself first. Your employer comes second. If the money or the job isn't right, then you do what you want by leaving. He promises you payment which is empty because if he was genuinely going to pay you, he would've done so BEFORE you actually did the work. You ALWAYS get paid first, then implement. No payment, no work. My ...


2

to the point where I then look stupid going to people after the meeting No you won't look stupid, it won't take them long to recognise that the issue is with the updates given by the manager, they probably have already. You don't have to do anything except your job. If they ask why you need something when the manager says you didn't, just politely refer ...


2

A company (unless there are contracts, laws, or unions to the contrary) can let you go with or without a PIP, without any notice, regardless of you "refuting" the claims or not. What you probably need to be focused on more is improving the situation and the your manager's perception of you. Denying there are any issues and saying it's all his ...


2

How do I quit my present company while ensuring that the formality is fulfilled? This really depends on what the formality is, what your contract says about it and what your local labor law requirements are. I strongly recommend talking to a local labor lawyer to discuss your options and the potential implications. If your current employer can withhold the ...


2

From how you're describing things, you're not working in a business analyst role. You're working in a report-developer role. They are two different things. A business analyst job description typically includes: Creating a detailed business analysis, outlining problems, opportunities and solutions for a business Budgeting and forecasting Planning and ...


1

How can I make my life better? You may want to consider a new job. In your defense, a non-IT manager (or even a MBA-type manager) cannot assess your code, so they don't know if your code is amazing or if it looks like spaghetti. They can only assess the output, and if he's too clueless to understand what your output is then he'll assess you on managerial ...


1

It’s easy to forget when we’re in the middle of working on a problem with someone we see as a teammate that our seniority puts us in a position of power over them. They can’t debate ideas with us as freely as someone who is as experienced as we are could. Giving them some space to present their side is important. The simplest way to address this is to adjust ...


1

I am persuasive, effective, and assertive to get stakeholder buy in, but there were also instances in which I can be opinionated, excessively forceful / aggressive, and dominating Honestly, this seems to me two face of the same coins. And we don't really know what is really going on. Some people consider assertiveness as agressiveness /dominance. On others ...


1

While I agree with the other answers that using this as a "head start" (and keeping quiet about it until actually starting) is a good approach - that assumes it is 100% okay for your to have access to that code before you start your new position (if, for example, you were moving from one team to another inside the same organization, and where code ...


1

I'm gonna focus on just one part of the question: because he starts convincing me with his arguments and emotional stuff whenever I tried something similar in past My guess is that he does this on the phone, and not with text messages, i.e. email. The solution is simple, don't talk to him on the phone. Block him. If you want you can send an email saying ...


1

To directly answer your specific question, "I want to convey this to him in a professional and diplomatic manner with a SOLID REASON because he starts convincing me with his arguments and emotional stuff whenever I tried something similar in past." Tell him this, Namaste Darsh, unfortunately I am not able to do any freelance, as my full-time job ...


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