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12

There are several answers and comments which talk about how things are in the USA, how things are in the EU, how some companies use the Bradford Factor, and so on and so forth. None of that is relevant to your situation. You're working in the UK, not in the USA or in the EU, and there the law says. Employees can take time off work if they’re ill. They need ...


8

It is perfectly normal for a developer or senior engineer or someone else to run a meeting when the normal person running the meeting is going to be out. (Or, where I work, when they are there, but want someone else to get the practice.) It sounds like it is a normally scheduled meeting, so the schedule and invitations are probably already set - you just ...


5

You go and ask for a raise like you would have without getting the 2%. Call a meeting with your manager and ask him what the requirements are to get a more significant raise. Assure him you appreciate his initiative, but you hoped for more, because of stellar performance in project x y and z. Never justify a raise "because others got it, too". Make ...


4

It's not abusive for them to ask you to run a meeting. Just run the meeting. Everyone sometimes has to do stuff they don't like or don't feel comfortable doing - your boss is not obligated to refrain from assigning you stuff for that reason. If they are going to ask you to do this on a regular basis and you have a skill gap in this area, I would encourage ...


4

To directly answer the main question (as per the OP title): I am definitely looking for a new and better job, but until I get one, should I ask my manager to refrain from going behind employees' back? No. There is no upside to it. It's not exactly clear what your goal even is, aside from moral righteousness -- you should reflect on exactly what your ...


4

Would be nice if you could elaborate better on "Usually a raise in our company is between 5-15%.". As a general opinion, I'd often say that "someone feeling unappreciated for not getting a raise on the first year" is an absurd complaint. In industries I've worked or known people, either: Nobody gets a discretionary raise within their ...


3

Consider pros and cons First of all, looks like your position in the company is currently relatively good. Although you do not have IT background, they gave you a chance and look like they are training you on the job - something that loots of folks would want, but cannot get in their current workplaces . You are gathering necessary experience and this could ...


3

If you want that position, apply for it. If your manager asks why, politely explain that the current situation is that your contract ends in a couple months. As far as you know, you don't have a job after X day. You should also be applying elsewhere. Although i will say... 3 months out from the end is a little early. I'd wait until the 60 day mark before ...


2

It doesn't make any sense to "escalate" the situation. It would have been suitable when you were impacted and the Director could have intervened. But as it stands, there is nothing the Director can do here to resolve the situation. As is always the case, if a peer is acting contrary to company policy and/or to the determinant to the company, it is ...


2

It sounds from your question like you would rather stay with your current manager, over the other job. If that is the case explain to your manager that you're really enjoying working with her and the team, but as the contract comes towards an end, you're going to start considering other roles and this one you've seen advertised has caught your eye. Explain ...


2

"Is it a wise decision as head of adepartment to let your direct reports present their strategy to the CEO, or would that hurt how you are seen as a leader?" Obviously depending strongly on your relationship with the boss, company-culture and workflow, one option would be to present the strategy as a team including you. If your boss has time and is ...


1

No, you shouldn't ask your manager to stop directly. But you can respectfully give your opinion, challenge them on their claims and set a good example. Some examples: "I disagree. While you're correct that DBA is useful, I think Full Stack Development is very important for the following reasons... We are lucky to have talented people like Susan working ...


1

Trouble is that no developer want to become a DBA because everyone is convinced that it is a role with no future, the role of relational DBs is always threatened by NoSQL solutions and many DB operations are increasingly automated, but that view was already common 10 years ago and actually it didn't happen, DBAs are still needed. Probably they are training ...


1

A team is built by a shared purpose and by communication among the team. What you noted is that there is less shared purpose. People who are more concerned about staying alive than working on yet another client issue - don't work as hard on the client issue. You are at a disadvantage because of "People also worry about the company's future which I can't ...


1

Get them more involved & engaged. Do you have a new project coming? Pull them into the meetings earlier, ask them to help with the design, and ask them "how would YOU do it?". Let them feel their voice is heard (and actually do it). Ask each one of them: "what can we do better as a team?" Embrace the good ideas. Encourage their ...


1

You are the best judge of your own fitness to work when you haven't seen a doctor. There is no prerequisite of averting catastrophes for taking a sick leave. When you have food poisoning and got chained to your toilet, you can probably tell you shouldn't go to work, despite not running the risk of having a car crash or burning your company down. Likewise, ...


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