Hot answers tagged

119

First, one thing no answer has pointed out yet is that you lied to John. This is a serious matter. No team can properly function when team members lie to their boss or their peers. Actually, that may be hindering the team's productivity right now. John doesn't know that Mike didn't have knowledge about the task you were doing. What if Mike has been doing ...


89

Is it too much to ask for leaves for my own wedding?! Well, you can ask. You did. You were allowed to take the leave that is in your contract and you were denied leave that is not in your contract. You have no right to unpaid leave, the same way your employer has no right to tell you "I don't need you, I won't pay you for ten days, but you don't need to ...


86

Alice openly expresses her dislike for Bob (to me, the rest of the team, and sometimes customers) Expressing dislike of a teammate to a customer is such an egregious violation of the norms of professional behavior that I'd warn her never to do that again, and fire her if she did so.


72

Somebody has got to say this: Don't. It is not part of Indian culture for every girl to have a royal wedding. Honeymoons aren't a part of Indian culture at all. I'd strongly suggest going to the finance forum and asking them how an expensive wedding will effect your life. On top of that, you don't live in India, you live in Europe. It is not European ...


53

Your gender and you sexuality is your agency, and it's understandable that you want to get it out in the open. However, you also have to be pragmatic, a fact I'm sure you're all too aware. In addition, in the interview, you are representing the company. If I was interviewing and the interviewer started discussing their own gender or sexuality, I would find ...


46

There is nothing wrong with two employees not liking each other, provided they conduct themselves in a professional manner. For instance, it is very bad that Alice tells others that she does not like Bob. That is unprofessional and unacceptable. Regardless of how they feel about each other, as a manager you need to have an expectation that they communicate ...


44

How can I go about requesting an extended period off work so that I can conduct my wedding and honeymoon in the same period? One thing that the other answers haven't touched on so far, is that the requested time off is very soon. You don't mention exact dates, but October this year is only 6 weeks away! Whilst this won't help for the current situation, the ...


38

Just do the interviews as normal and forget about this aspect of it. It's not that important and people are getting more enlightened and accepting these days. You making a deal of this is likely to cause more confusion and uncertainty than just carrying on with normal business practices. You're the hiring manager, and that's all that really matters here....


23

You can say, without blaming Mike, that you sought help from Mike and implemented what you understood his instructions to be to the best of your ability. Say what you thought Mike's instructions were. Say you are not sure whether You misinterpreted Mike's instructions. You understood Mike's instructions correctly, but implemented them incorrectly. You ...


20

Is it too much to ask for leaves for my own wedding?! Generally not no - but 5 weeks is a rather extreme amount. Losing an employee for 5 consecutive weeks when as your boss has said there's upcoming work is majorly disruptive. Not only that but it's also exceeding your remaining holiday amount. I asked him if he can allow me to connect from home for ...


19

Go over there, don't try to fix it by calls. Get the three of you in a room. Explain the situation as you experience it. Explain the consequences of their behavior towards customers, team performance and their professional advance. Listen to their side of the story, do not judge them. Ask them how they think the situation can improve and what they think is ...


17

There's too much to address here, but I'll cover some things that I think are important. First, your write-up speaks largely of your attitude and approach to managing employees. It also shows that you are very new to management or just very insecure. If your first assumption of taking on the management role is that "everyone else is terrible but me", then ...


15

Your task, your mistake You needed help and asked Mike who genuinely provided what he thought what was best for a task assigned to you. A good question you might ask yourself : what good can come out of blaming Mike? In my opinion, badmouthing Mike to your boss might only give a poor image of yourself. As you said yourself, John 'hasn't the best tact or ...


12

Like others mentioned if you have a good working relationship with your manager, you should be able to ask about it if you catch him at a good time. A simple "Hey I have been hearing some rumors about a transfer to Y's team. Do you know anything about this?" should suffice. Since this is about the future of your work, yes, it is your business and you should ...


10

Explain to your supervisor that the timesheet has to be accurate as: (a) you're signing to that effect, and it would be immoral and illegal to sign a false declaration (b) the timesheet records when you are on the employer's business and in the event of any dispute or claim will be produced as evidence. For example, if you are injured whether you are on ...


9

You tell your manager/friend right after you send your resignation letter to HR. Not before. And don't feel bad leaving him. It was his decision to make a career change. You are not being compensated for that (and it appears, neither is he). Depending on how good a friend he is, you can tell him in an unofficial setting you think he's in a bad position and ...


8

What is the best way for me to have this meeting with HR and not place myself in the firing line? My first instinct is to suggest you don't have the meeting at all... If your manager is most of the time nice and understanding, but sometimes he becomes excessively critical, it may be due that he/she is under a lot of stress, deadlines, etc.. This is not ...


7

There are a lot of good answers here. But I don't think any of them have addressed the amount of notice you gave your boss. A general rule of thumb in the UK (where I'm based) is to give notice that is twice the length of the holiday you're requesting. So if I want to take a day off, I give my boss two days notice, if I want a week off, I give my boss two ...


6

Throughout your working life, there are going to be a lot of situations where people above you who are not your direct supervisor are going to ask you to do things. This is something that you will have to get used to. Yes, the proper procedure would have been for the "upper boss" to contact your supervisor and clear it with them. However, you have to be ...


6

Short answer: Yes. Raise it with your manager, they can then determine how to proceed and with whom. Firstly, if you were to get fired for reporting something that someone else already knows about that has been around for two years, then you probably have bigger issues to worry about in that organisation. Now that's out of the way, I would suggest you ...


5

Blame doesn't have to belong to one person, it can be shared. It's not necessarily a mistake to get help from a coworker rather than you boss, unless your boss has given you explicit instructions to go to him for help. Especially if Mike is senior to you. If Mike is aware of the misappropriated blame, then the ball is really in his court. The decent thing ...


5

I understand the perspective that you want to be proud of who you are and I think you can work it into the conversation if you chose to. Since you are openly transgender, I think that will come naturally. Some of us have the "privilege" or "burden" of being able to hide our diversity and choosing to reveal it is just amazing to help the community at large ...


5

Conflict of interests does not apply in the employment scenario, unfortunately. Conflict of interests usually only applies to public funds and in areas of civic responsibility such as political posts etc. Companies and businesses do not need to be transparent or publically accountable. They have all the various rights to privacy that will make your ...


5

It's a good sign - you have useful skills that have come to the attention of someone in a position of authority! Just make sure your own boss is aware of any requests that come in, it's up to him to take it up with the other boss if he has an issue with it.


5

It sounds to me like this manager is disorganized and doing a lot of things at the last minute when the pressure is high. Perhaps someone reminded them of a deadline to submit names for training or something. Even if you would be obliged to repay the training if you left, they pay for it to begin with so it has to come out of some sort of budget. And on ...


4

It is unfortunate but common that offers like "free training", "tuition assistance", or "free education" come with strings attached. A "pay us back if you leave within some defined period of time" clause is a particularly common requirement. Remember, the whole point is that the business wants to be sure paying for something is useful to them, it is not a ...


4

I would tell that friend before accepting any offer that you have applied to several job positions because of your current financial position and your career prospects. Make it very clear that you did not look for a new job because your friend was promoted manager, but because you feel it is in your best personal and professional interest.


4

IMHO, why should that become a dedicated topic of conversation. Your gender identification is your personal thing and you have nothing to justify or apologize for. Naturally, as part of the conversation - sure, otherwise why?


4

The HR team is available to help you through a challenging conflict with your manager, both formally an informally. In your discussion, you should express a specific request of the HR team member you meet. You could ask for things like: "I want help preparing and thinking about how to best approach my manager to keep the conversation civil and productive." "...


3

How do I go about first telling my immediate boss and then all of my staff? Just tell your boss. Reach to him/her privately, perhaps going to their office, and tell them just like you did here that your name is now other. I suppose this implies that you will also update or obtain new ID cards, credit cards, bank accounts, etc., so I suggest you ask your ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible