Hot answers tagged

97

You asked, how can I deal with millennial employees challenging me? I think the answer really is, deal with them the same way you deal with other employees. At it's best, employment is mutually beneficial - the employer and the employee both receive something positive. At the root, both parties are motivated by what they get in that exchange. Intangible ...


51

You are in a very difficult spot, one entirely of your own making, for which the blame falls squarely on your shoulders. Once an employee has become so disgruntled that they are asking their manager to be fired, and doing so publicly, the manager is left with no choice but to fire that employee. If you don't fire this person, you are essentially letting ...


28

Times and views about work are changing. If you don't change with it, then you are going to have these problems. Honestly for the sake of 10 minutes, let them have it. Actually, increase their lunch break to 1 hour and let them come in between 8 and 10, and leave between 4 and 6, so long as they cover their hours. It should be about productivity. Work isn'...


25

The clash over working hours between controlling managers and younger programmers is far from new. I'm a baby boomer, not a millennial. Around 1974, I was a bright young programmer working on an urgent problem. Back then, computers were big, lived in special rooms, and were scheduled hour-by-hour. I rarely had more than an hour a day of computer time. I had ...


18

Ask your experienced colleague to pick out a task for you to do in parallel with him. He does the task, at his pace, as though you were not there, so it gets done regardless of your activities. Meanwhile, you work on it at your pace and to the best of your ability. When you finish it, possibly long after the deadline, you compare your work to your ...


16

The answers above are dealing with start/end time policy. I believe the issue is how to teach subordinates how to respectfully "manage up". There is disagreeing with a policy, and presenting this disagreement in a respectful manner. Hopefully, you have brought to their attention their start/end time policy faux pas in private, and this conflict was not ...


13

Start looking for other suitable work opportunities During annual review at the end of November 2019, a lot of quarrels and contrasts have arisen between those managers, and the company headquarters This implies that the company headquarters is aware of the issues. If the headquarter/responsible team has not taken steps to revive the situation for a ...


8

Discuss this with your manager. Just ask your manager to help out on the training matter. Make it clear that you can perform the additional tasks, but not without training. It is your manager's job to manage your time and help look out for your career. Proceed cautiously and try to stay calm about it. Why is Manager A doing that? Hard to know for sure, ...


7

Corporate Culture While you have framed this as your employees challenging you, I would suggest you view it as a scenario where you have challenged your employees, and the result is not looking good for you. I'm not sure if you have noticed, but software engineering has some of the highest worker demand of any field. It also has very short tenures, for ...


7

Take a deep breath and ask yourself two questions: What brought you to the current situation? I cannot tell from your question whether it is a single odd person or multiple of them having the same attitude, but generally speaking, such a "fire me please" attitude don't come from nowhere. Maybe the mentioned employee(s) has expressed their thought ...


6

One or two years is well within the scope of a normal decision-timeline about raises and promotions. Don't tell your employer you are leaving within such a scope because a solid raise and promotion is often an gamble on the part of the company: not worth it in the short term but quite possibly great in a few years. By telling them you will leave within ...


6

Even though I always advocate for transparency and honesty, in this case, I don't see any benefits for mentioning this, if you're quite sure you will be leaving the company in the next year or two. If you say that's your plan, your employer will, most likely, avoid giving you any long-term positions or responsibilities and place the bet on some other ...


6

So I said yes to him while still looking for other opportunities. How do I tell my manager that I am no longer interested in the role that he offered me? Is there anything I could have done to be more transparent and professional? I'm assuming that you accepted the new role without saying that you would still keep looking elsewhere. Doing so ...


6

Sometimes permissions become a status thing. Your manager may not have realized you actually need the permissions you are requesting, and wants on principle to minimize their spread. If you just need access to a server to study it, make that clear because your manager may be able to get you read access without giving you permission to make changes. Only ...


5

As you say, despite all the long lunches, being late, they are doing fine work. So the best way for them to respect your authority is to just leave them alone and let them keep working as they are. There is very little to gain for punishing a good employee over an arbitrary rule, like being somewhere at 9 am sharp when being 15 minutes late doesn't cause any ...


5

In addition to Patricia's answer, if you think you have some time at your disposal everyday, why not utilise it to learn advance concepts of CAD? There must be several tutorials both free and paid, that you can see in your free x minutes everyday. You can easily learn advance concepts with enough practice that even experienced people would not know. In ...


5

Try to have split meetings. One is discussing how you do it, another is what you do it. Try to explain that when you let your creative energies go wild, you may find optimal/faster solutions you wouldn't otherwise find. It's hard for people to get used to it at first, but splitting this allows you exploring and finding better solutions. If you spend 1h per ...


4

First make sure you are giving the PM all the information they need in a way they understand it. So for your first example you said that you presented option Red, and said the benefit was that it gave you other features for free, at which point the PM rejected it. Did you also make it clear that it was the fastest way to deliver the feature? Or did you take ...


4

Document, document, document. So when your product fails to be delivered on time, which seems quite likely, then the finger points straight at the product manager. If your product is in any way security related (and any product is) then compiling a component with warnings disabled is a recipe for disaster. I'd talk to QA that they should demand that this ...


4

Do I tell him he's forgetting or reap the benefits of additional time off since we only get so many days a year? It might entirely be possible that the manager is just keeping a separate note somewhere for all the leaves applied by all the employees (which are approved) and updating the system only once in a while. Though not very common, it's possible. It ...


3

You need to take care of your side - because sooner or later, this is going to be backfiring on you as you cannot perform the assigned duties. The facts that: Both Manager A (your direct manager) and Manager B are in the same reporting hierarchy Your manager not having enough work assignments for you Manager B is not trying to outright steal credits for ...


3

Do I tell him ? Yes, but do it in writing. You want to create a paper trail that clearly shows that this is not your error or even malicious intent. Not logging time-off correctly is a potentially serious offense that can be interpreted "stealing from the company" or "fraud". You want to make crystal clear that whatever happened is not your fault and that ...


3

You should probably discuss between your remaining colleagues if you think your branch will recover or will close down. If you agree that the branch closes down, you look for new jobs, and consider not contacting HQ at all. Just see how long they pay your salary. Nobody might figure out that you are paid salaries for no work for a while. (I just read you ...


3

Personally, in a situation like this I’d answer the question with an unspoken “[Assuming you were to stay here permanently], what would be your longer term goals?”


3

100% No. When they ask about your long term goals, that means your long term goals within the company. Goals that working for the company will help you achieve. If they ask long term goals personally, you talk about areas that you want to learn or improve on that are related to your position in the company. The last thing they want to hear is that you plan ...


3

He is sure to be very disappointed. I am not so sure about. The job that you really wanted is not there anymore. It is normal to think about a decission even though after "accepting it". Remember what you said: which while being a okayish role, was not the "dream role" that I joined this company for. You are the one that matters here! I think it is ...


2

I'm taking the opposite tack from my usual, which is normally to side with the employee (unless they're obviously and grieveously in the wrong). My opinion is that this isn't about bean counting or clock watching. It's not about whether or not the company policies are draconian (having and enforcing a start time isn't draconian). It's about understanding ...


2

As a manager you should lead by example and transparency would be one aspect of leading by example. Dictating without providing the reasoning of why the request was made would be perceived as arbitrary, especially by knowledge / IT based employees (if these are). They do fine work, but they don't respect my authority. I suspect most likely your employees ...


2

In general, when management expects you to do something but don't provide you with resources, information, or support, it's because they're expecting YOU to "self-start", figure out what you need and get it done. I agree it's an uncomfortable situation, it feels like you're left in limbo and there are no guard-rails to keep you on track. It may help to ...


2

Do I tell him he's forgetting Yes, but in a nice way. Something like: Hello boss, do you remember that you approved me a sick leave on ... (date). I see that it does not appear in the system, and I worry that ... (reason; e.g. you will not have enough vacation days) Will you please verify and eventually enter the info again? You might continue: Maybe ...


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