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758

You did exactly what was instructed, and took scores from "barely passing" to mastery. Emphasize that. If your boss won't bend, offer to take the game down. Meanwhile, you may want to update your resume, taking scores from 68% to 96% is something that gives you HUGE bragging rights. I would also suggest seriously thinking about making educational games ...


460

I want my manager to know my actual background and areas of expertise and feel guilty that I “stole” a position using someone else's credentials. However, I'd also like to retain my position, if possible. How can I tell my manager that I was hired by mistake? Skip the "hired by mistake" part - that's just silly. Deal with the "my manager doesn't know ...


347

Act out of professionalism, not out of spite. That said, you can act professionally without making it easy for them. You need to get your resume out, NOW Start scheduling interviews ASAP, take time off if you need to, with or without compensation for those interviews DO THE MINIMUM REQUIRED It's not personal for them, it shouldn't be for you. They are ...


319

What's a work-appropriate way to say "Please stop talking and let me work"? Once they state the request, repeat it back to them and then say: Do I understand the requirement/change correctly? If they say yes: You say “Great, now let me get this done for you”, then turn from them and start working. If not continue the dialog with the person making ...


314

I agree with your concern. It is far too easy for a woman to be treated as a personal assistant, regardless of her actual job. However, I think your comment about not being the manager's secretary may have been enough of a warning that you are not going to stand for that sort of treatment. He embarrassed you, you embarrassed him back. Now you need to try to ...


284

She's just a manager. She's not the company owner. There is HR, and there is your previous manager who is in a higher position than she is. So unless your previous manager always wanted to get rid of you and left the dirty deed to her, you are reasonably safe. "Attending the conference is a condition of your employment here" is extremely confrontational, ...


280

You need to be able to divine the "Real Reason™" behind what your boss is saying. Option 1: He's truly unaware it's a "supported configuration." As the one who is in charge of IT for my company, my response would be, "Well, yeah. Put it any way you want. Call us if it stops working." They're designed to be used that way. If you want, I'll bring a ...


267

If in your first interaction with your new manager, that manager threatens to fire you for not cancelling an already approved PTO just to attend a conference, you clearly need to establish that you won't put up with that behavior. Any kind of negotiation that lets your manager get away with this would just mean more of the same in the future. If she's ...


257

You have first-hand, relevant experience with how he manages teams. You'd be negligent as a team-player and employee if you did not offer that input, as long as it is objective and non-personal. This is why companies try to cajole frank references from people who have worked with prospective candidates - they feel this information is valuable, when they can ...


253

I think you're asking the wrong question. I'm going to go ahead and say that challenge was probably designed for you to fail it: You've been given a really impromptu test, which is kind of weird outside of an interview setting. I've never heard of it happening like that before. If my manager suddenly did that, I'd stare blankly at him and ask what the heck ...


252

Can anyone translate this from workplace speak? Basically, your manager wants you to work extra hours without being properly compensated for those extra hours of work. If I were you, I would only do my work during normal working hours and start looking for a new company to work for if you are reprimanded for not working extra hours for free.


241

Has doing it your way ever helped? Was there even once a time when you used indirection and injection and extra interfaces, and there was a last-minute swerve, and it was all handled smoothly and beautifully with no swearing? Even at a previous job, if you've never been able to get that code committed here? I'm going to assume there was. Practice telling ...


236

You might want to take some arguments from the book The Mythical Man-Month by Frederick Brooks. Although it was originally written back in 1975 (overhauled in 1995), it is still one of the most important works regarding management of software development teams. It is most known for codifying Brooks's Law: adding human resources to a late software project ...


228

You do this by presenting the thought process that led you to this conclusion - not the conclusion alone. This gives the team, or the individual, a chance to offer their perspective regarding your concerns. You might find that there are viable solutions to the problems you anticipate, which you did not think about. Ask prompting questions that highlight ...


228

Personality traits are often observed and confirmed through subtleties in your behavior, and I suspect you're oblivious to those subtleties. Just as an example, I'm going to dissect a single sentence from your question: my boss, which I consider a really capable and smart manager, has a system for measuring developer performance, in which I constantly get ...


222

How can I tell him to say "no" if he means "no"? You probably can't. However you can stop asking questions that have Yes and No answers. Instead of just saying "Can I have resources for project Zerble?", say "I need resources for project Zerble. Assuming you'd still like me to go ahead on that project, when should I expect to receive them?"


218

While it's not immediately your fault that people are spending too much time on the game, as the developer, you could help the situation. Turn off the scoreboard server/disable the game entirely for now. Go to your boss and show the increased test scores to show what benefit it has brought. Work with them to create a middle ground where employees are still ...


213

Let us reconsider what you wrote: You raised a valid concern. While I have worked with my spouse on two occasions, the employer always asked me if we were okay with it. It is the sensible thing to do. Interpersonal problems are as much a threat to any company as technical problems. They lied to you. It will only be a few more weeks. When that did no longer ...


211

No. This is explicitly prohibited on Glassdoor: We allow reviews that name individuals in the highest positions in a company who have broad influence over the work environment, as long as the review describes the individual’s behavior or performance at work. Individuals in this category include those who are the public face of the company (C-Suite, ...


208

This sounds like someone actively trying to sabotage your position in this company. In a situation like this, it's plain bullying. It's time to end the pleasantries and fight back hard whenever anything like this occurs. So as soon as something like this happens: He gave me an official warning for something I didn't do Then you reply, copying HR and the ...


207

Talk to the hiring manager of the new place. Make sure that they're aware of the sensitivity of the situation. If there is another manager at your company that they can talk to, give their name also. If you're the person that the hiring manager wants for the position, they'll find a way around this problem - you won't be the first case that they'll have come ...


205

A simple follow-up email would be sufficient: Hey boss, just wanted to thank you again for the pay rise before Christmas, definitely came as a very welcome surprise! Happy holidays, Sirence. Even if you are indifferent, he's gone out of his way (ie 2nd time interacting with you) to give you a raise. It doesn't cost anything to thank him, and it'll keep ...


205

A wiser man than me said “You can make people stay in the office for 80 hours a week, but you can’t make them work more than 40 hours a week.” That’s the problem you are running into, and there’s nothing you can do. People come to the office because you pay them. They work because they want to. And you know why these people have no motivation to work.


203

Is it okay for my family to intervene in my career, workplace or professional life? No. Never. As a working professional, you and you alone are responsible for managing your interactions with your employer, manager(s) and colleagues. Your parents or any other family member, including spouses, have no role at all to play there. A parent who "intervenes&...


196

You launched a formal complaint complete with witnesses and documentation which was investigated for 10 weeks while you were paid for doing nothing, and then your complaints were found to be groundless, even your witnesses did not back you up. Is this co-worker relationship salvageable? No. You put multiple people into a difficult position. Things will ...


193

Note down as much detail as you can recall about the private call, and report it to the manager and HR of the company. Calling potential candidate privately is extremely unprofessional, not mentioning in your case it's actually pretty rude and rather naive. You should reconsider if you still want to be onboard with the company according to their response to ...


192

What would you have to gain? You saw them. They saw you. Both of you knew why you were there. Both of you were probably at least a bit embarrassed about it. Bringing it up just means dredging through the embarrassment again, to no apparent gain. Better to remain silent and pretend it didn't happen. Maybe allow yourself a wry shared smile, or something....


192

However as the company grows (expecting to double in the next year) and beyond, how can I ensure that this policy is kept to/isn't abused when extended to a larger and larger amount of people? This is what middle management and company culture are all about. As new employees join, make sure they understand your liberal company culture - what kind of ...


190

The short answer: No, you should not tell your boss that his work was worthless. Instead, express that it's not what you need. My rationale is that worthless is emotionally charged, maximally judgmental, and very much subjectively based. Worthless implies that there is literally zero underlying value to the way your boss arranged the information, and ...


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