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118

What do I do? Job search. There are many red flags in this situation ranging from an incompetent and unreasonable boss to every sign that this will soon be a 'Failed Startup'. So, the only suggestion I have is that you soldier on for the revenue stream until you can find another job and then quietly leave.


34

But is what he's doing right? No. Or am I wrong? No. A manager this bad will crash and burn. The "start as intern, then become part time, but keep the intern's pay" side just confirms it. Find another situation/job. Keep contacts with the people in the company that you want to keep as friends. Search for another job while still there if you can. ...


12

Since you really didn't ask a question, I just want to adress the last sentence: The only issue is that whenever we hire someone, they tend to be really incompetent for some reason. Either your hiring process sucks. Or your managing process sucks, and your company turns good people into bad people. Find out which one is it, and fix it!


11

Here's the thing: The entire rest of the company uses Tool A. Even if you personally think using Tool B makes you more productive, it: Makes your manager less productive by having to learn both tools A and B. Makes any internal transfers to the team less productive by having to learn tool B If tool A is industry standard and tool B is not (which tends ...


11

There are 2 possible things that could be happening here: This developer is very incompetent. You have a docker configuration for development, so it should be fairly simple to append whatever needs to be done for production. In theory you already have production infrastructure set up, and documentation (or a domain expert) on how to productionize the ...


8

Manager wants to me to change methodoloy for no good reason and I don't accept it, so we will have a meeting about it. How should I proceed? You do it. If you don't like following instructions you could consider being self-employed.


8

Phrase your emails in a way that puts the onus on him to respond. So instead of asking: We have a problem. Should I do FOO or BAR? Send an email saying something like: We have a problem. I'm going to do FOO this afternoon in order to solve it, but if you'd prefer me to do BAR then please let me know. And if he doesn't respond, then you can do FOO rather ...


8

Please help me in understanding how better I could communicate this with my manager. Be direct. Schedule a meeting with your manager. Tell them you feel you have grown a lot and you feel that you belong in one of the expert teams. Ask what the path for a transfer to one of those teams is. If your manager cannot show you a path forward, be prepared to look ...


7

Not going to lie, your friend is probably facing an uphill battle here. 12 direct reports isn't a huge number and your friend's current proposal not only creates an extra layer of hierarchy (which their manager doesn't want) but promoting (or worse hiring) extra managers is going to bring increased costs for the business. If he wants to successfully pitch ...


7

Well there is nothing wrong with "provides top cover" or just "provides cover", but also: "...has our backs..." "...runs interference..." "...protects his team..." To name a few others.


5

Is this really about Tool A vs. Tool B or is this more a general problem with following instructions that don’t have a solid justification attached to them? No one likes having to do stuff they disagree with but that’s kind of the nature of the whole employer/employee relationship. It sounds like you’ve been given a good amount of decision-making freedom ...


4

This is a simple accountability loop: Set Expectations Monitor Performance, support, train Assess Performance Consequences: Corrective action or reinforcement back to 1 That said, my experience is that some employees just never "get it." So the consequences eventually end up being termination.


3

It sounds like an awful position to be in. Do you have any formal line manager with whom you can raise a complaint? Or if not, perhaps a more senior or experienced colleague whom you could use as a mediator? Update: Make sure to keep a record of relevant email correspondence, so it can be referred to in any resolution meetings you (may) have. - thanks, ...


3

"The thing is...as I said, I have no problem in following orders, as long as it is something that makes sense." You don't have the political pull to do whatever you want to. If you did then your manager would be asking you what to do. A CTO told me that when he joins a company it usually takes 2-3 years to get the CEO to actually change course and ...


3

Schedule a meeting with your manager about career growth. Talk to him and say that you want more challenging work. Say you have different ideas about how this could be done: Different tasks in your team (the stuff the senior does), changing team. Ask your manager how you could do more challenging work, if he has any ideas. Because change of team is only one ...


2

Perhaps consider other options? He's supposed to have a very hands-on contribution to all meetings and plannings, in addition to the personnel management aspect. He's stretched entirely too thin to do that with the twelve people he's got. Check. His manager doesn't want to increase hierarchy, which is entirely reasonable - extra layers come at a ...


2

Part of a managers role is to be a buffer and primary point of contact between his/her team and the rest of the World.


2

I face the same problem. Same environment (India, IT, Timesheet). I have fixed my problem. I think this issue of your manager over asserting themself isn't an isolated event. It usually starts with small favors. In my case, they started with calling me during off hours to get an update. Slowly update turned to small hotfixes in production and so on and so ...


1

This is simple, you are the boss. It sounds like he's just throwing obstacles in your way, honestly. An experienced developer will commit and push code very frequently to their own branch - the only place where there would be a concern for pushing broken code, would be a release, integration, or master. Did you put him in a position to re-architect the whole ...


1

It seems like you are dealing with an inexperienced developer, who is not used to being managed. Maybe he's done solo/freelance work before and has technical skills, but from what you wrote, you are probably his first supervisor (at least the first who actually supervises). Your company, your reality. Up to you to know if you can afford to straight up the ...


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