Hot answers tagged

261

She's just a manager. She's not the company owner. There is HR, and there is your previous manager who is in a higher position than she is. So unless your previous manager always wanted to get rid of you and left the dirty deed to her, you are reasonably safe. "Attending the conference is a condition of your employment here" is extremely confrontational, ...


253

First of all, if in your first interaction with your new manager, that manager threatens to fire you for not cancelling an already approved PTO just to attend a conference, you clearly need to establish that you won't put up with that behavior. Any kind of negotiation that lets your manager get away with this would just mean more of the same in the future. ...


167

You do this by presenting the thought process that led you to this conclusion - not the conclusion alone. This gives the team, or the individual, a chance to offer their perspective regarding your concerns. You might find that there are viable solutions to the problems you anticipate, which you did not think about. Ask prompting questions that highlight ...


48

I would talk to your old manager and get him to find out if she is serious. Is she just trying to show off her authority? If so, then that is an easy way to lose a developer with what looks like serious consequences. If they have not been able to find a suitable second yet, then if she causes you to move on, she would be signing her own leaving certificate.....


39

The new manager says, 'attending this conference is "a condition of your employment here"'. The old manager already decided it wasn't essential that you be available that week, and you have that in writing in the form of the original approval for the leave. You have a bus factor of 1 on your job and you're willing to quit. The new manager hasn't (as far as ...


38

I am an idea guy I am the person who will come up with dozens of ideas a day for various things. 1-2 I will write a one pager about. However, I am also conflict averse and am exactly the type of person to be careful about sharing them lest I annoy someone and can easily be convinced to keep it all in my head. So I sympathize with your employee. Solution....


32

My manager seems to think it will take time for me to deal with everything, and it's okay for him to explain me everything I need, and that I'm not really productive right now. You seem to be in good company and management, most of the folks complains about just the opposite. You manager understands your situation and extending the help they can to bring ...


26

Consider using the Socratic Method, asking questions to lead them to the same conclusion you hold. "Novel idea, Vikas. What about authentication?" "Okay, how do we get the security keys to them?" "Oh, so we can't do that unless they're already authenticated via the old method. Drat. Well let's put this idea aside for now. Does anyone else ...


16

Do I have to persevere, until I get to understand things better Yes. I have been developing software, as a freelancer for *cough* decades, and there is a point in every project, usually after 3 or 4 weeks, where I feel hopeless & think that I will never learn it. This passes every time, and knowing that helps me prevent depression/hopelessness. It's ...


11

Whether or not there is a legal basis (e.g. employment contract) for them revoking your leave, you may be covered under Promissory Estoppel. This is not legal advice, I am not a lawyer. The elements of Promissory Estoppel are: Some form of legal relationship either exists or is anticipated between the parties You are their employee, so a legal ...


9

This is a point of negotiation. Convey to your boss today in writing, “I am very concerned I’m going to lose my vacation payout. Please tell me in writing I will be classified as a CA employee at the end of my notice or I will be forced to move my last day up into 2019. I really want to finish knowledge transfer and help the company through the ...


9

I find this an unrealistic (time constraints) goal ...then pull your boss in and tell him that, as soon as possible. If you're not going to be able to meet that deadline because you're new on the project, that's likely not the end of the world - it happens. They may be able to draft in help, give the client advance notice that it's likely to be late, get ...


7

Have a talk with your own manager. Explain what you've learned about their technical problem. Explain what solution they're currently pursuing. Explain what solution you have in mind. Tell him that the impression you get is that they're not open to different solutions than they're currently pursuing. Now ask your manager how to proceed. His job as a ...


7

First of all, make sure you are approaching them in a official capacity, not just as a colleague-met-next-to-watercooler person. Couple of steps, when you are working as an adviser for a team which is not directly being managed by your superior: Ensue your manager and the manager of other team is aware of your involvement. Document everything, all ...


6

Nobody can say for sure, but this is a feeling that many people have. One little tip that is important: If you learn something from person X make sure you remember it or write it down. I have often worked in companies where some employees(including younger me) would use 1 or 2 senior developers as personal Google and ask them things that were explained to ...


6

Ask them to create a Proof of Concept (PoC) for their idea. They will gain some experience and if you are correct will see it fail as you predict. I've seen PoC's built like this, that address existing problems from very start. This has lead to new learning and new fixes for old issues. They may have answers that you've not yet explored yourself.


5

From the company's point of view, you told them you would be absent for 4 weeks, and them come back for a while before you leave for good. You say you are the most junior member of the team. That means that in reality, if you were going to stay for two or three years, it would be worth the cost of training you for maybe the first year in the hope that the ...


4

You need to earn their trust and respect as individuals (or at least the trust of one or two of the more senior members of the team). You say that you're confident that their approach to the project is flawed. That doesn't matter as far as your short term goal is concerned. Instead, try to offer your help to deal with immediate problems they're facing. ...


4

If you have an estimate on how long it will take, let your PM/Analyst know that so that They are aware that Friday is not possible They have an ETA e.g. “I’ve looked at the client request and my estimate is that it will take X days so I’m estimating delivery of this by this date ...” If you don’t have an estimate, let them know that you don’t e.g. ...


4

Speaking as a manager of software engineers, I have to say that when we hire someone, we aren't hiring them because we expect huge productivity in their first month (or first few months) of employment. We are hiring for the long term. We do eventually expect productivity, but we know we have complex environments with a lot to learn. We want someone who's ...


3

You're not going to be always right about what's going to work, and what's going to fail. Even if you have decades more experience Just as an example: a few years ago, my boss had an idea of how to accelerate a process with automation. He did a bit of research and concluded that - given the technology we were using - it wasn't possible to implement. A few ...


2

TL;DR: Your boss isn't justified, but it's (most likely) not a negotiation, so just make sure you handle this situation carefully and strategically to avoid costly mistakes. Your boss is in the wrong, but tread carefully I think your boss is totally in the wrong. That said, make sure you handle this situation carefully. If you leave, you want to do so on ...


2

Who Knows? +1 to @thonnor's suggestion of allowing a POC, and @stefan's observation that past experience is not always a predictor of future performance. I would try to approach the problem a bit more econometrically, like so: If you had no other projects to work on, then you should let your team try The New Thing. Obviously, part of the problem is that ...


1

But if I try to say that it is going to fail and we cant use your idea for this project, then that is kind of demoralizing for them. What would be the great step in this situation? Basically, you thank them for coming up with the idea, then explain the problem with it. Something along the lines of: "Thanks for coming up with the idea, X. It shows some ...


1

You could talk to your manager and ask why the change in the atmosphere at work. However, I am wondering about how you got in this situation in the first place. I suspect the answer might be "You are leaving soon". If that is the case, there might not be much you can do, other than bring forward your plan to leave. I have also been asked by my manager ...


1

The unfortunate truth is that (at least here in America) colleagues/managers tend to talk to/befriend you mostly because they need something from you (usually they need you in their role). Once that need goes away, often the relationship does as well. I've seen this multiple times even when people simply switch roles within the same team. They make new '...


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