Hot answers tagged

318

What's a work-appropriate way to say "Please stop talking and let me work"? Once they state the request, repeat it back to them and then say: Do I understand the requirement/change correctly? If they say yes: You say “Great, now let me get this done for you”, then turn from them and start working. If not continue the dialog with the person making ...


283

She's just a manager. She's not the company owner. There is HR, and there is your previous manager who is in a higher position than she is. So unless your previous manager always wanted to get rid of you and left the dirty deed to her, you are reasonably safe. "Attending the conference is a condition of your employment here" is extremely confrontational, ...


266

If in your first interaction with your new manager, that manager threatens to fire you for not cancelling an already approved PTO just to attend a conference, you clearly need to establish that you won't put up with that behavior. Any kind of negotiation that lets your manager get away with this would just mean more of the same in the future. If she's ...


227

You do this by presenting the thought process that led you to this conclusion - not the conclusion alone. This gives the team, or the individual, a chance to offer their perspective regarding your concerns. You might find that there are viable solutions to the problems you anticipate, which you did not think about. Ask prompting questions that highlight ...


207

Talk to the hiring manager of the new place. Make sure that they're aware of the sensitivity of the situation. If there is another manager at your company that they can talk to, give their name also. If you're the person that the hiring manager wants for the position, they'll find a way around this problem - you won't be the first case that they'll have come ...


194

Note down as much detail as you can recall about the private call, and report it to the manager and HR of the company. Calling potential candidate privately is extremely unprofessional, not mentioning in your case it's actually pretty rude and rather naive. You should reconsider if you still want to be onboard with the company according to their response to ...


193

However as the company grows (expecting to double in the next year) and beyond, how can I ensure that this policy is kept to/isn't abused when extended to a larger and larger amount of people? This is what middle management and company culture are all about. As new employees join, make sure they understand your liberal company culture - what kind of ...


192

What would you have to gain? You saw them. They saw you. Both of you knew why you were there. Both of you were probably at least a bit embarrassed about it. Bringing it up just means dredging through the embarrassment again, to no apparent gain. Better to remain silent and pretend it didn't happen. Maybe allow yourself a wry shared smile, or something....


190

The short answer: No, you should not tell your boss that his work was worthless. Instead, express that it's not what you need. My rationale is that worthless is emotionally charged, maximally judgmental, and very much subjectively based. Worthless implies that there is literally zero underlying value to the way your boss arranged the information, and ...


189

You actually ARE in a position to change this. You lead by example. You can start using version control locally for your changes. You can simply 'commit' everyone else change at the same time. You will always be able to recover previous versions and compare things to prior versions. You can also offer to do this for the company. Setting up version ...


189

You don't have to withdraw your application. You can explain the situation as is, or just make it clear that you would not like them to contact your current employer. Simple: I'm sorry, I have not announced my intention to leave and it would greatly worsen my relationship with my boss if you were to contact them for a reference. If a reference from my ...


184

A wiser man than me said “You can make people stay in the office for 80 hours a week, but you can’t make them work more than 40 hours a week.” That’s the problem you are running into, and there’s nothing you can do. People come to the office because you pay them. They work because they want to. And you know why these people have no motivation to work.


176

Your manager is not being unreasonable. She asked you to reserve tickets, you reserved tickets, she acquired (and paid for) tickets based on that reservation, and now she expects you to pay for them. That's not an unreasonable position to take. Perhaps she should have double-checked or something, but by the same token, you should have told her once you ...


173

As an introvert SE, I have my style of doing things and getting things done. Same here. But an introvert isn't a protected class, nor is it a disability, so anywhere you work isn't going to start running to make special considerations for you based on the fact you "just prefer to work in the zone". There's two angles I'd take here. Firstly, if any kind of ...


171

You're missing the obvious third option: Stop working on Saturdays It's clear you're not allowed to work on Saturdays so you should stop doing it. If your manager tries to force you anyway you kindly respond with: Of course I would work on Saturday if you need me to, as long as I can officially enter those hours in my time-sheet and receive the proper ...


169

First of all, Congratulations!! That said, I believe your superior made his intentions very clear with the statement "I will review and determine the best way to move forward but this is not a democracy." You did your job, without having been asked, twice. Don't sweat it anymore, let them manage. You anyways have the proof that you tried helping. Your ...


165

Option 4: Go to an actual medical doctor, get all the examinations (blood tests and whatever else the doctor asks for) done, and see what an actually qualified person says. The doctor can tell you to eat breakfast, or not to eat, or what to eat, or something else altogether; at least you will have an opinion more qualified than that of either your boss or ...


162

Would you want a co-worker to alert management if they suspected you were leaving? The problem here is that you could really damage someone's career by precipitating his termination before he finds another job. Sadly, the job market is extremely harsh and "red-flags" any candidate who happens to be unemployed. It's just work, let it go, what's the worst ...


161

I cannot decide whether this is me getting demoted, or just Alice getting promoted, or both at the same. Unless your title is changed, this is just Alice getting promoted. Congratulate Alice, enjoy the new focus of your work, and work hard together so that you both succeed and get rewarded. Also I was planning to ask for a raise soon, maybe even today....


146

Should my manager be aware of me being offered opportunities to other companies? The short answer to this is no. The longer answer is that once you make that statement, you have essentially said "I am not happy here for whatever reason, and I am looking." Once you have implied this, it is really hard to take it back. Your best approach is to keep this ...


138

my manager was made to undergo anger management training I don't know about your situation, but Alcoholics Anonymous have Step 8 & 9 in their program: Step 8: Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all. Step 9: Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure ...


135

Like it or not, social or "soft" skills are more critical than you think. While I absolutely do not subscribe to the idea that a person's thought and behavior can be boiled down to a few letters, being an INTJ or an introvert does not preclude you from being a good workmate. Promotions always come with an increase in responsibility and almost universally ...


133

It is just corporate life, not you A colleague of mine returned from a 4-week vacation yesterday. In that time, our boss left for a new company. Maybe 3 minutes was spent catching the colleague up on that before we all returned to our usual work. When the boss left, there wasn't a lot of fanfare or discussion. He cleared out his office, we spent maybe a ...


124

Later that day I received a email reinforcing that he does in fact expect me to show up with my college degree. I am unsure how to handle this situation. The easiest solution for this is that you just show them your degree. If you indeed have it you have nothing to lose by showing it, and that will satisfy their requirement; everyone happy. I then ...


120

First, one thing no answer has pointed out yet is that you lied to John. This is a serious matter. No team can properly function when team members lie to their boss or their peers. Actually, that may be hindering the team's productivity right now. John doesn't know that Mike didn't have knowledge about the task you were doing. What if Mike has been doing ...


120

Is this misconduct on his part? Surely he shouldn't be saying that.. Don't know if "misconduct" is the word but surely this is something unprofessional to do. However, I fear that the point here is that you were hinted that you may be getting fired soon, so I would be preparing my resume and start applying to jobs ASAP.


118

TL;DR - There is nothing, absolutely nothing you need / should do to react in a professional capacity. Just carry on, business as usual. I also act normal since I don’t merge my professional and personal spheres of life. I don't think you're very good at it. You are letting your personal issues (out of the office relationship) cloud your professional ...


116

First of all, quitting is always an option. What would your colleague do if the company suddenly closed its doors? (This happens, and the employees are usually the last to see it coming). Your colleague needs to stop making excuses and start job hunting for real. It may take a long time, but there are better jobs and non-toxic managers out there. In ...


110

Should I let management know that I consider leaving the company due to these practices? Never say directly that you are thinking of leaving - as soon as management know that you're not committed to the company, that always puts you at risk of being out of a job without a new one to go to. Or at least let them know that I am growing quite frustrated? ...


108

None of what you've stated is empirical evidence that Bob is planning on leaving. Additionally, none of this is your business. Should you inform the future PO that Bob may be leaving soon? No.


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