New answers tagged

1

Consider using the Socratic Method, asking questions to lead them to the same conclusion you hold. "Novel idea, Vikas. What about authentication?" "Okay, how do we get the security keys to them?" "Oh, so we can't do that unless they're already authenticated via the old method. Drat. Well let's put this idea aside for now. Does anyone else ...


3

You do this by presenting the thought process that led you to this conclusion - not the conclusion alone. This gives the team a chance to offer their perspective regarding your concerns. You might find that there are viable solutions to the problems you anticipate, which you did not think about. Ask prompting questions that highlight these problems, and ...


1

I am an idea guy I am the person who will come up with dozens of ideas a day for various things. 1-2 I will write a one pager about. However, I am also conflict averse and am exactly the type of person to be careful about sharing them lest I annoy someone and can easily be convinced to keep it all in my head. So I sympathize with your employee. Solution....


5

This is a point of negotiation. Convey to your boss today in writing, “I am very concerned I’m going to lose my vacation payout. Please tell me in writing I will be classified as a CA employee at the end of my notice or I will be forced to move my last day up into 2019. I really want to finish knowledge transfer and help the company through the ...


0

Speaking as a manager of software engineers, I have to say that when we hire someone, we aren't hiring them because we expect huge productivity in their first month (or first few months) of employment. We are hiring for the long term. We do eventually expect productivity, but we know we have complex environments with a lot to learn. We want someone who's ...


4

Nobody can say for sure, but this is a feeling that many people have. One little tip that is important: If you learn something from person X make sure you remember it or write it down. I have often worked in companies where some employees(including younger me) would use 1 or 2 senior developers as personal Google and ask them things that were explained to ...


22

The new manager says, 'attending this conference is "a condition of your employment here"'. The old manager already decided it wasn't essential that you be available that week, and you have that in writing in the form of the original approval for the leave. You have a bus factor of 1 on your job and you're willing to quit. The new manager hasn't (as far as ...


14

Do I have to persevere, until I get to understand things better Yes. I have been developing software, as a freelancer for *cough* decades, and there is a point in every project, usually after 3 or 4 weeks, where I feel hopeless & think that I will never learn it. This passes every time, and knowing that helps me prevent depression/hopelessness. It's ...


28

My manager seems to think it will take time for me to deal with everything, and it's okay for him to explain me everything I need, and that I'm not really productive right now. You seem to be in good company and management, most of the folks complains about just the opposite. You manager understands your situation and extending the help they can to bring ...


7

Whether or not there is a legal basis (e.g. employment contract) for them revoking your leave, you may be covered under Promissory Estoppel. This is not legal advice, I am not a lawyer. The elements of Promissory Estoppel are: Some form of legal relationship either exists or is anticipated between the parties You are their employee, so a legal ...


176

First of all, if in your first interaction with your new manager, that manager threatens to fire you for not cancelling an already approved PTO just to attend a conference, you clearly need to establish that you won't put up with that behavior. Any kind of negotiation that lets your manager get away with this would just mean more of the same in the future. ...


177

She's just a manager. She's not the company owner. There is HR, and there is your previous manager who is in a higher position than she is. So unless your previous manager always wanted to get rid of you and left the dirty deed to her, you are reasonably safe. "Attending the conference is a condition of your employment here" is extremely confrontational, ...


34

I would talk to your old manager and get him to find out if she is serious. Is she just trying to show off her authority? If so, then that is an easy way to lose a developer with what looks like serious consequences. If they have not been able to find a suitable second yet, then if she causes you to move on, she would be signing her own leaving certificate.....


4

You need to earn their trust and respect as individuals (or at least the trust of one or two of the more senior members of the team). You say that you're confident that their approach to the project is flawed. That doesn't matter as far as your short term goal is concerned. Instead, try to offer your help to deal with immediate problems they're facing. ...


6

Have a talk with your own manager. Explain what you've learned about their technical problem. Explain what solution they're currently pursuing. Explain what solution you have in mind. Tell him that the impression you get is that they're not open to different solutions than they're currently pursuing. Now ask your manager how to proceed. His job as a ...


7

First of all, make sure you are approaching them in a official capacity, not just as a colleague-met-next-to-watercooler person. Couple of steps, when you are working as an adviser for a team which is not directly being managed by your superior: Ensue your manager and the manager of other team is aware of your involvement. Document everything, all ...


0

What I would do in your situation: Write a simple cover-your-ass mail and then do as told, as best you can. Something along the lines: "I hereby inform you that I feel unable to complete the task given within in the desired deadline. I already start working and will do my best to complete the task. But my best guess is, it would take at least XY + there are ...


4

If you have an estimate on how long it will take, let your PM/Analyst know that so that They are aware that Friday is not possible They have an ETA e.g. “I’ve looked at the client request and my estimate is that it will take X days so I’m estimating delivery of this by this date ...” If you don’t have an estimate, let them know that you don’t e.g. ...


5

From the company's point of view, you told them you would be absent for 4 weeks, and them come back for a while before you leave for good. You say you are the most junior member of the team. That means that in reality, if you were going to stay for two or three years, it would be worth the cost of training you for maybe the first year in the hope that the ...


1

You could talk to your manager and ask why the change in the atmosphere at work. However, I am wondering about how you got in this situation in the first place. I suspect the answer might be "You are leaving soon". If that is the case, there might not be much you can do, other than bring forward your plan to leave. I have also been asked by my manager ...


1

The unfortunate truth is that (at least here in America) colleagues/managers tend to talk to/befriend you mostly because they need something from you (usually they need you in their role). Once that need goes away, often the relationship does as well. I've seen this multiple times even when people simply switch roles within the same team. They make new '...


9

I find this an unrealistic (time constraints) goal ...then pull your boss in and tell him that, as soon as possible. If you're not going to be able to meet that deadline because you're new on the project, that's likely not the end of the world - it happens. They may be able to draft in help, give the client advance notice that it's likely to be late, get ...


9

While it’s understood to not be as deep or long-term as a marriage, your job is still a collection of relationships. So try this situation out on other relationships. If your new husband (congratulations!) left for a few weeks and told you that he was planning on divorcing you in eight months, how would that impact your interaction with him? Yes, the ...


78

I'm honestly surprised that you're surprised by this. You essentially already have one foot out of the door - and have just given the team a month to get used to working without you. It might seem wasteful not to fully utilise a resource that's going to be there for another 7-8 months, and truth be told it is in my opinion. But that is easier said than done ...


6

While I don't leave for a long time like in your case. I do declare my intention to leave my company a while back to my Leader and manager. A lot of things have changed since I have returned and its getting hard for me to cope up nowadays. Should I expect this to continue? Is it advisable to shift jobs now, because I will be leaving within a few ...


133

It is just corporate life, not you A colleague of mine returned from a 4-week vacation yesterday. In that time, our boss left for a new company. Maybe 3 minutes was spent catching the colleague up on that before we all returned to our usual work. When the boss left, there wasn't a lot of fanfare or discussion. He cleared out his office, we spent maybe a ...


0

If you are not a network admin, stay out of it. Seriously. This has the potential to be more dangerous for you, because questions will be raised at how you knew about his folder, and why you were going through the files. Danger, Danger Will Robinson! (fifty cool points to whoever is the first to get the pop culture reference)


1

Get over it. He has his way of solving problems, you have yours... he’s in a position to execute his solutions, you aren’t. If you feel that you can implement a better network wrapper, ask if you can have the The source code The time to work on it If you feel that you shouldn’t be using a v5/v6 wrapper, either Stick to the version you have Wrap the ...


-3

Inform the IT team. This is potentially a data breach. There are a number of regulations put into place around the handling of personal information, including things like the GDPR in Europe. I would recommend contacting the individuals responsible for handling compliance with these regulations in your organization so that this can be handled appropriately ...


2

Just tell him. It will likely be an embarrassing and/or funny moment. Or e-mail him at least. Keep it private obviously. There is nothing else for you to do. It's mostly just an interpersonal matter. I don't know how this raises any difficulty.


3

I am surprised that, in addition to telling him about the situation, no one mentioned that he might temporarily hide(given he has the user permissions to do this) the files, so they still exist, but are no longer searchable.


6

Why not do this? Have a quiet word and inform him that you found those images. Tell him to tidy up and you are having a long lunch break. End of story. We all make mistakes. Give him slack. He might give you slack in the future. We all make mistakes.


1

The situation is rather embarrassing... I am not a network admin, but I have duties that have to do with IT. Do your duties entitle you to coming up with a public untargeted suggestion that having a lot of work files out of version control system isn't good for the company? And that the company should consider either: making regular backups of that ...


3

If you are 100% sure that you had permissions to access the personal folder in the first place and there's no doubt about that, I'd tell him in person and not do anything about the files myself. It's his business in the end You would have to be the one making the call to perhaps delete files, that aren't stored anywhere else. I'd be upset, if you just ...


0

Now this is a conundrum! I would dismiss your own suggestion to simply delete the files on two grounds. Firstly, it is unethical to tamper with someone else's personal files without their permission. And secondly, it implicates you in your boss's unethical behavior, possibly in a legal sense. In my mind, you have three quasi-ethical options: Follow company ...


20

As much of your statement and comments are indicating, this seems an oversight. I could dream up scenarios where the boss wants to assert his authority and show that he can put whatever he wants out there, but I highly, highly doubt it. There's also the point that while he'd probably be quite glad if it were removed for him, you are messing with "his stuff"...


70

No. 1) You cannot delete the whole folder, as it contains some appropriate files. 2) How do you know what's appropriate and what's not? You'd have to go through all of his files. It's not your job and actually worse IMO. Additionally, you can't be sure if you've removed all of it, you could be hiding the issue. Bring it up to him privately instead You'...


4

You have in fact addressed the organizational problems correctly by raising them with your manager. Little is being done with them, but that is beyond your control. Have you considered that "pushing harder" might create a conflict that is neither necessary nor productive? As it stands, it is neither your nor your manager's job to fix these organizational ...


0

In my experience, right after the shake up is when you want to try to get your move - I wouldn't wait. I've managed teams for about 11 years now. If someone goes to HR first, that would either really tick me off, or make me feel bad, depending on whether I knew there was an issue or not. And as an executive, I know you'd be labeled as a trouble maker. (I ...


6

My question now is: in what order should I ask various stakeholders to change to a different sub-team? I don't think there's a formalized process for this at the company -- perhaps I should try to check with our HR first? Since you don't appear to know/understand the proper protocol at your company, your first visit should be with HR, to ask about it....


6

Saudi Arabia specific answer I'm assuming you are a migrant worker since you aren't a manager and it would be very unusual for a Saudi national to be treated this way. Unfortunately this is normal and part of the working culture, workers come from abroad and are often pushed to their limits for as long as they can take it. The pay is very good but there is ...


0

how to avoid such a catch-22 situation in the future? Do not accept responsibilities from multiple people when only one of them has control of your priorities. It's only OK to work for multiple people if you can tell them "I'm busy with something else this week, but I can start your job next week." or "sorry, I'm fully booked until next year". If you have ...


0

tldr: Missing priorities are your problem, not the additional tasks - But be sure not go over head of your manager now. [...] How to avoid such a catch-22 situation in the future? If someone comes with additional tasks, ask him to prioritize them together with the CEO / other task giver. (If possible request a written/verbal confirmation of CEO / other ...


1

I'll just add this second-hand story as advice for the future. My brother, an industrial engineer with a good amount of experience, was called on the carpet for not meeting a big goal at his company. He responded to the CEO like this: "You asked me what it would take to do this job. I said that with a 6 person team and such and such resources, we would ...


26

we have to work 6 days a week and ... stay late on top of that We know from experience that this can end in two ways: the work schedule returns to "normal values"; the employee leaves. I know from my workplaces in 19 years. Also, the Internet is full of similar statements. In a comment you said: the manager thinks it's all a waste of time. Now we just ...


4

I totally agree with the answer that you need to communicate this to the CEO, and that you probably should have done so sooner. However there is an aspect that is not mentioned above that you should be aware of since it will occur again and again in your working life. Namely there are many different management styles, and a lot depends on how your company ...


3

Disclaimer: I know absolutely nothing about working in Saudi Arabia and the culture surrounding it, my suggestion is based on my experience in Europe and the USA. You are in a position where both your manger and you, are unhappy with the current arrangement. You don't like to be worked around the clock, six days a week, and he doesn't like how little is ...


44

You (and your manager) seem to be in urgent need for a proper management process. What you must do do avoid just the scenario you mentioned: Have a proper work plan. Estimate the work before you actually start working on them. Have a pre-decided acceptance criteria for each and every assignment. Have scheduled review meetings. Use a project management tool ...


2

You committed to achieve certain goals within three months. Two months in, you suddenly realize that you are not going to make it. Immediate stress is the result - how are you going to explain this to the CEO? The pressure is on, and you look for an escape hatch. In retrospect you see that you were spending a lot of time on secondary tasks given by your ...


21

Communication is the key. Targets can change, but that should not come to anyone as a surprise. If your theoretical (on-paper) targets are not aligned properly with the actual work, then there's surely involve a gap which will make you look bad despite delivering the assigned work. As gnasher729 already mentioned, you should have had this conversation ...


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