New answers tagged

4

I can't exactly answer your question, because you use almost identical words to tell us what you experienced and then in the proposed email, and ask if it's accurate, and since I have no independent knowledge of the situation you're describing, I can't know how accurate it is. However, I can still give you some advice. You're "burying the lede" by ...


0

I would suggest against anonymous feedback in general. Assuming everyone is competent and wanting to improve, feedback will be generally used for improvements, and anonymous feedback means you can't be contacted to clarify or extend on what you said, making things harder for your skip-manager. 9 / 10 times, your writing style will uniquely identify you ...


1

I don't think your new lead is showing hostility, but they are genuinely trying to do their job as a manager. Try to assume best intention since your new manager is new in their role, and try to work together to get a better work agreement. frequently getting nitpicked on our public chats for day-to-day conflicts in development like breakages in the dev ...


2

Unless there's some highly sensitive information that you want to disclose, I would not suggest making this anonymous. In general cases like this one, anonymity does not help. In case the feedbacks are true and you expect some action to be taken based on that feedback, you should be able to own up the comments mentioned in the feedback. Also note, a feedback ...


2

This isn't uncommon, your manager trusts you to take the new person under your wing. I've been on both sides of this. When I was young, I was in the position of the new person, then I've been in your position. Your manager wants this person encouraged, and wants to keep it as low-level as possible, and it puts you into the position of being a mentor. It's ...


3

Before you "deal" with it, try to find out the "why". Your former teammate might feel that your tone/habits towards him (which were acceptable earlier) undermine his authority. Or perhaps somebody sees him as a threat now that he acquired his position, and tries sabotaging him by hinting him false accusations about you. Perhaps the new ...


0

I think you misdiagnosed the core problem. This isn't an issue of 'direct manager backstabbed her'. This is an issue of your mom having a different vision on employee interaction than her supervisor. You're describing the new employee as insubordinate, along with some actions the employee has taken. Now, your mother has an expected series of actions she ...


7

If people think leadership is restricted to managers, they will never show enough leadership to be promoted to being a manager. This isn't uncommon. Your manager is giving you an opportunity to mentor a new employee and is trying to 'soften' the feedback. Instead of telling the new employee directly and having them get all snowflake-triggered, the manager ...


1

I don't want it to be obvious that my manager has given this feedback Why not? You have been tasked with relaying information, there is no need to be secretive about it's source. You have no business relaying it as if it comes from you. Ideally the manager would do it himself but if you have been tasked with it there's nothing wrong with passing it on. '...


-2

Don't. You are not a team lead. You are not a manager. This is, quite literally, out of your pay grade. I'm not saying you can't or shouldn't. Learning to give feedback is an important skill but it should be something you want to do and see the need for. Here it seems that so far this is not the case. If you ever get to that point, ask your manager for help. ...


0

Part of me feels it's my manager who should be having this conversation. I agree with that part. Unless you are their superior in some capacity, you have no business managing or trying to manage their activities. This is a poor call from your manager, or a deliberate attempt to "come clean" in case the suggestion does not go well with the new(ish) ...


8

What to do? Mum should be working with a mental health professional. They would help her overcome her mental fatigue, psychological stress, and overly emotional reaction. They would also teach her some more effective coping strategies and how to better deal with negative feedback. She should not seek a demotion. She should learn whatever legal remedies ...


2

According to your description, it seems that there is a conflict between your mum's expectations regarding doing things, and the new employee's way of doing things. I know this kind of conflict from my own experience, both in the professional life, and in the private life. In time, at the cost of pretty much destroying my health, I learned that as long as ...


9

I am unsure as to how to navigate this landscape. Last time you attempted to enter grad school you surely included a recommendation letter, and at that time you weren't at this company. Do that. Obtain letters from other sources as you did before. As stated in comments, you've been here for less than 3 months, so any recommendation letter you obtain from ...


4

For literally decades now, the running joke in IT, at least, has been that if you want a raise, you should find another job. Twice, I have seen people go through this. My present employer pulled this on a former coworker. They refused to meet his requirements, then when he quit, they ended up advertising his role, with fewer duties, for more money than he ...


1

If they are advertising the same job 30% higher but not forthcoming with a rise then you should think about moving on. Unfortunately many companies take advantage of inertia - you like the culture there, it's comfortable so you put up with being paid 2/3rds of your worth. 2 years experience counts for a lot on the job market. Your boss has shown he is more ...


2

I explained that since my start I have not received a raise ever since I started working here 2 half years ago, and his reply was that my first 6 months of employment cannot be counted, since it's probationary period of employment.(that really doesn't make sense since I was working during this time). So he said it's only been two years not two and half I ...


4

It's not uncommon for an employer to find an excuse to get an extra 3-6 months of work out of you before giving you a promotion you already earned. Plus however long it took you to decide to ask. Some would say that you should never worry about how much other employees make. I disagree. There will be differences in pay due to the negotiating skills of the ...


8

This company I am working for also has my same position at 30% more in salary then me as well as a starting base I seen on the postings, as they continue to hire new people and keep expanding the team. I am becoming annoyed and starting to feel as I am being lied to about every getting a raise, along with the fact I am not being paid correctly as well. Just ...


3

@Zuck, I would cut your manager some slack at this stage. When you refer to him discussing your ideas with the head, you have to understand that it is not necessarily his role to originate ideas, but to gather, select, develop, and communicate good ideas that originate in the milieu of his team. That is, it is not simply your idea that has been presented, ...


12

I'd like to give you a gentle frame challenge. As you say, this is your first job. You have heard about toxic managers, and you think you've spotted one. What you don't know is just how toxic some managers can be. (Take a look through the manager tag to see some of the things people are dealing with.) This manager sounds pretty normal to me. To take it point ...


1

A lot of other answers suggest documentation. This never hurts, but it will probably not solve your problem (fully). You should realise that although you are devoted (almost) full-time to this project, your manager probably has lots of other things on his/her mind as well. So you should just give him/her some slack about forgetting some things and just learn ...


2

Apart from job hunting elsewhere, is there anything else I can do? Not really. Following a company restructure and furlough, I have been placed in the other department again. This is important context - it sounds like your company has clearly been struggling financially because of recent events, and had to make redundancies / furlough staff in order to ...


-1

The other answers focused on documentation. Since people (and especially managers :-D) often ignore documentation they did not write themselves, I want to answer from the people-side of the question: Your manager will forget during the span of a week. But to remember, he needs more than just hearing it once. So what you can try is: Repeating the core ...


-1

Document, document, document. But in today's world of constant video conferencing you could create a 1 minute TV style intro that says all of the stuff you keep having to repeat. Add some dramatic music and animated titles. Play at the start of your sessions with the boss like it's a pro wrestling intro. It's your show.


3

Every project requires extensive documentation. You won't get around writing it anyway, so you might just as well start with it now. Put it into a publicly accessible location. Then, when your manager asks a question about the project, you can just refer them to the documentation.


6

Simple answer: Use documentation, and a project management tool. Long answer: Knowledge, as long as it resides into one particular location (i.e, connected / limited by one individual) is always at risk of loss. In a properly structured program or organization, there should not be any scenario where to execute / run a program, anyone has to depend on any ...


4

When I've been in a situation where someone attempts to use unauthorized communication methods, I just ignore 100% of that communication. I've never had to do that to a boss and as others point out, that's sort of risky for your job security. But it would be unethical for you to blatantly violate your NDA and you would be legally liable for damages if ...


1

I have a sort of deja-vu as I worked in Italy for many years and, regardless of the company size, I feel it has been common, in my experience, to see behaviours as such. More generally seeing highly opinionated Managers and Bosses inviting people to be more professional or more committed, with disregards of law or even company self-made code of conduct. A ...


0

I agree with the other answers which say that the manager is out of line. However, I feel that a clarification is needed - if getting back from your holiday a few hours before starting work is affecting your productivity at work, then the manager may have a point. You are right that the workplace cannot dictate how you spend your vacations, but if the ...


8

Your answer to my comment as I wrote, for less severe discipline actions (at least in my company) it is possible to only notify the HR and the HR writes down them in their records. For other actions, HR must be involved before and must be present This is extremely weird (I am French and our employment law is similar to the one in Italy) but in that case, ...


6

It is true, that company doesn't have any say what you do with your vacation, but there might be another factor why manager thinks, that it's unprofessional. I thought it's great to think about why they might think so. At least in my country, the world wide disease is still something that is relevant topic and thus, companies are pushing for people to ...


6

Early exits and late arrivals are covered by PTO approved by my manager and are registered in my time-sheet as such, all per company policy This other manager really doesn't have any grounds for complaining to you about this. You asked about this in advance and the company told you that it was OK. If there was something wrong with you doing this, then the ...


13

The problem here IMO is that the offending manager is using weasel-words, in this case "professional". He's not saying it's against the rules (to which you could pull out your contract and ask him to point to the paragraph, or you could ash HR, who sets the rules, for clarification and tell him to shove it when they say you're right), he's not ...


43

I have worked in Italy, and the behavior of the manager who filed this warning doesn't surprise me. While working as engineer in the "Ufficio Tecnico" of a company, with my working hours were clearly stated to be Monday to Friday, 8:00 to 13:00 and 14:00 to 17:00, I had to listen to complaints voiced by the CEO for: leaving earlier than the CEO (...


29

I want to understand which is the best pattern here: First let it be clear that no matter what action you take, the offending manager is already holding a grudge and is already targeting you so you need to defend yourself to hopefully stop his current behavior. The fact that he would even have details as to whether or not you are at your home during your ...


106

I am very annoyed by this warning and I think it is completely nonsense. You are right to be and it is. So there are two aspects to this. One is merely silly, the other is patently ridiculous. By and large, your employer doesn't get to dictate how you spend your time off. If you want to maximise your travel time during a holiday that's entirely up to you. ...


7

I'll post my own answer. I got tired of waiting and send a reply to my own email copying my manager's manager. He quickly replied demanding the use of MS Teams in order no to breach our NDA


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