New answers tagged

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3. Inform the CEO of the situation. I’m hesitant to do this because it may lead to the immediate termination of the GM which would cause significant disarray because I’m the only on-location manager capable of covering for the GM fully but I’m not available for the next two weeks. Edit: this is the 7th or so instance of approved time-off being ignored. ...


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Well, this is the 7th time this has happened. Without being harsh, this is something that you should have complained about every time it has happened. For all the business knows, you could have made non-cancellable bookings, either for flights or accommodation. First of all, assume it is a mistake by the GM and bring this oversight to their attention. Give ...


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How to handle vacation being cut short? You wrote "this and concessions to my volunteer summer teaching gig causing me to miss all of this vacation". So if "this" accounts for one day, and "concessions" accounts for all the rest, then no matter what you do in regard to this job, you are only getting one day back at best. If I saw that I was incorrectly ...


2

Shoot him an email outlining that it has been brought to your attention that he does not feel you ask him enough questions which result is slowdowns. Ask him to clarify his concerns, and inform you of the best way to communicate your questions to him. If he contradicts what you have been told send his response to your supervisor and ask they help you how ...


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How should I proceed in this situation? Start asking the boss questions again. It is better to have a problem of asking too many questions instead of having the problem of not asking any questions. If you feel that the boss could help by answering a question then you should at least ask the question. Remember that asking questions is never pointless ...


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Good managers would welcome, rather than retaliate against, constructive criticism, and you would fear no reprise if you found some quirks they have they can work on. If they've caused no problems to you, and in fact have helped you out in certain situations, by all means, say this on the review form! For example, "My manager, Curly Howard, has a tendency ...


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It is often done at the executive level. However, people usually understand it as part of the job. Come in, turn the company (or department) around, and then be replaced, with some nice package. The reason for it is that changing something will bruise people's ego and the person making large changes will often make too many enemies, or accumulate too much ...


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Is there anything I could do to prevent this from happening in the future? Your best shot is to do research on the company and their leaders and weave in some relevant questions into the interview. Examples are "when do you use consultants and when do you prefer permanent employees?", "what is your current employee turnover rate?", "how long people ...


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No - a reasonable firm will not hire you as a permanent employee with the intention of letting you go unknowingly. The scheme you describe likely isn't the case. There are much better alternatives to hiring and firing - in terms of cost, morale, and reputation - for short-term work. The total cost savings you suggest your employer may have realized is ...


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Are there areas of good practice that you haven't mentioned or are flat out unaware of? It is unusual for anyone to be great at every aspect of their job, especially one requiring such a complex (and recently developed) knowledge base. Additionally, new hires are sometimes selected to cover known weaknesses. It is plausible that your technical lead has ...


4

Do you think you would be better fit for Lead Data Scientist? Because this is what your manager will glean from your approaching him about the current one`s shortcomings. Even if you mention that you are NOT gunning for the promotion


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This is a VERY VERY tricky situation and you have to be very strategic about how you do this. Before you run to any PM with your complaints you need to back everything up with proof. You need: dates Times Type of incident(problem committing a git branch/adding new git branch Summary of what was said by either party regarding any disagreements you said ...


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First of all, remember one thing, you are not in charge of reviewing the work (pattern or habit) for the lead - so go ahead raising a flag only if their behavior is a problem and has a direct impact on your work outputs. In case, due to their work habit, you (and others) are facing difficulties, I'd suggest the following steps: Try noting down the ...


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Great reviews are balanced (address both strengths and potential growth areas), specific (address specific behaviors, not general attitudes), and include evidence (anecdotes of the behaviors discussed). Part of your job as a reviewer is to identify opportunities for your manager to improve, even if minor behaviors. Everyone could always do something ...


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Get this straight - A review is not a criticism. It also captures the success stories - more importantly, which actions lead to success for certain person / scenarios. Remember, all feedback are constructive: Negative feedback provides us with the action points to work upon to improve Positive feedback recognizes the efforts that went in and sets examples ...


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Congrats on getting a good one! Most managers need improvement. Just do a recap of what s/he has done in the first half, making sure it is in an obviously positive light.


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"If you use a comma delimited string as a SQL parameter on the website again, I will beat you senseless" This was not a physical threat. This exact phrase "I will beat you senseless" is commonly used in a hyperbolic way for comic effect. I believe this is generally understood by native English speakers. It probably didn't occur to the senior that it would ...


2

I was in exact same situation where a senior engineer used to always yell at junior folks and I also was under his verbal attack once. I will just advice what I did in my own situation. What should I do? Immediately talk to your manager and HR if needed. Tell them you are uncomfortable with his tone and language. Should I stay and accept that I ...


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When I explained the mistake, he angrily yelled at me and said "If you use a comma delimited string as a SQL parameter on the website again, I will beat you senseless" This also makes me sad and angry. A teachable moment between you and the senior developer that was completely wasted. No mistake deserves this kind of treatment. It's completely ...


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IMO the answers to this question and similar on workplace are missing a significant point – Health & Safety. In the USA & UK, H&S regulations require that in the event of a site evacuation all personnel on site need to be accounted for. I assume many other countries have similar legislation. Ref. USA OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health ...


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My UK government employer has "flexitime" for all grades. Core time (when staff must be present) 10:00 AM to 3:30 PM, working week 37.5 hours (5 notional days of 7 hrs 24 min). Workplaces are open from 7:00 AM to 6:00 PM. At the end of each four-week period, staff are allowed to carry over three days "up" or two days "down", and may take accumulated "up" ...


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Let's get it straight: not every person is able to work in "flex hours" environment. Sooner or later, you'd hire someone who will abuse the system. And the bigger the company is, the more of that "incompatible" people would be hired in. So, performance tracking is your #1 choice. If there are too many people do not match the tracking criteria, it is a big ...


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"Work from home" is also called "going to university". It's a natural extension of the workplace for people who have shown they can be trusted to produce without direct supervision. As someone suggested, have middle managers monitor this; preferably those with experience managing remote teams. Just periodically review performance, and ensure they understand ...


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I work at a company with 800+ employees, that has flexible hours as one of the perks of working here. The way this is managed is by access control via RFIDs, but this doesn't mean that management is draconian about working 40 hours a week(although it's expected that you're being productive some amount of hours close to 40 each week). The fact that access ...


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Trust, but verify. Broadly speaking, you want to trust the people under you. If all of the work is getting done, and there are no complaints, there's NOTHING to investigate/look into. Might be worth asking about people's bandwidth, to see if there's a case of "I have very little to do" or "I'm about to burn out under this workload", but generally, if ...


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Joe Strazzere has an excellent answer. I will add this answer in case you find that your system doesn't scale. I have no desire for them to 'clock' in or out I will mention that clocking in/out is (to some people) a "factory" thing for low skilled workers that aren't trusted. I can see why this might be distasteful. There are other methods of ...


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However as the company grows (expecting to double in the next year) and beyond, how can I ensure that this policy is kept to/isn't abused when extended to a larger and larger amount of people? This is what middle management and company culture are all about. As new employees join, make sure they understand your liberal company culture - what kind of ...


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There are two issues you are facing. One is how to check 40 hours a week and obligatory hours to be present in the office. This can be easily enforced by simply calculating time "logged in". It may of course require some more paper work on your side (depending on country and legislature) but it will just work as backup. Your company state "we trust you ...


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It depends why you want it not to be abused. If you're worried about employee not working enough you'll have to put in place performance indicator. Then it'll be another discussion if you let employee come and go as they want as long as performance target are met or not. If you want employee to be on site around the same time and a minimum of time to ...


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I have a hard time seeing the correlation between enforcing 40 hours and not clocking people in - such a system is probably being "misused" as it is and you can't tell because of the scale. You're either enforcing hours or you are not. Mind that clocking people is not a mere nuisance or a sign of distrust, it is an administrative tool that gives you ...


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How can I ensure that this policy is kept to/isn't abused The simple is, you can't. You have to trust your employees, that's how the flexible working system tends to work. I have no desire for them to 'clock' in or out This is pretty much the only way to ensure that nobody is abusing the flexible working and that everybody is doing the time that they ...


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Some of the existing answers take the approach of convincing the smoker to just wait until everyone who is sensitive to smoke has gone home. That's not enough -- even if the smoker only smokes when they are alone in the office, the smoke gets into everything and can cause problems for sensitive people the next day or in the longer term. (It can also cause ...


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What is the best way to handle? Your best bet is to do the best job you can while your still there. Also document as much about your tasks\responsibilities as you can so that the next guy has a starting point to pick up and go. Provide this documentation to your boss on your final day. Obviously you cannot control how your ex-manager behaves, so don't ...


2

Sometimes a manager may take someone quitting personally. Or perhaps he would prefer to just focus his attention on those that will be with him long-term. Were you friends with him? Did you hang out together after work? If not, what do you expect? If you're not particularly close to him he may have just moved on and is more concerned with those ...


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What is the best way to handle? You continue to act in a professional manner during your notice period and don't worry about how your soon to be former manager behaves.


1

Working from home means working - just from your home. It is harder to monitor what you’re doing remotely, which is why the company doesn’t just have everyone working from home all the time. So you need to expect additional requests for status and communications basically to try and ensure you are really working and getting things done as you would in the ...


0

If it was me personally I would speak a mental health advocate organisation FIRST. To be honest with you the possible micro management could be also viewed as 'harassment' due to your mental condition. I'm not saying that is the case, just that this is causing you discomfort and you want a resolution so you can focus on your job. I don't know where ...


7

You should discuss your concern with your manager, and possibly engage HR to ensure the accommodation is implemented in a mutually agreeable way. Have an in-person conversation with your manager about the extra status updates. Let him/her know that they feel different and intrusive compared to how you work together in the office and suggest an alternative (...


1

You need to alert the manager. Phone or email are fine, especially considering the outcome will likely be disqualification for the role regardless. The sooner you alert someone yourself, the better the chances are that you might be able to salvage the role. Learn from the error: Amend your resume to correctly reflect your education. Include your incomplete ...


2

Inform your hiring manager ASAP, but do it in person or over a phone, so as to both impart more urgency and leave less of a paper trail. Don't say you lied and don't make excuses, just state as a matter of fact that your application was incorrect. People know what it means, but it's best not to admit to more than you need to. Lies about education are the ...


0

Don't ever lie about your education on your resume It can not only get you disqualified from the hiring process (or fired years after you've already been at the job), but in a lot of places apparently including Washington state it's actually illegal. This could be far more serious than "a really, really dumb thing to do". You should find a local lawyer (...


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As very well noted in other answer and comment, talk to your potential manager ASAP. Do not wait until your meeting next week. Be prepared that confessing about the lie will most likely lead to disqualification. Good that you are planning on confessing, better to do it before the company starts the background check and approach your school. I'm not sure ...


2

It stinks to be micromanaged by a committee. If this becomes the norm, you will probably want to get another assignment where they don't do that. In the meantime: Respectfully, try to think of the situation from the point of view of these people. In their minds, some or all of these things may be true. Transitions in people are difficult and a little scary....


1

Feedback in a healthy organization should address both strengths and weaknesses. Your colleague is neglecting part of his/her job if they only offer positive feedback. Offer some “meta-feedback” to your colleague about the quality of feedback they have been offering you. Ask for a 15 minute conversation with your colleague to invite and share some feedback....


4

If you believe you could perform the role well, take ownership of the process. Your team and manager will be grateful for you taking the initiative. What I want: Someone takes ownership ( me or anyone) and communicates with business user, once requirement is finalized document it and explain to the team (if necessary). Stop by your manager’s desk, and ...


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I can manage this developer+ business analyst role by myself and everyone knew that but they are not letting me alone to do this. What I want This is not my job. Why you are asking this? Don't make this unnecessarily complex, this is simple. Let me do it, don't nag Your question seems to have a one-sided slant to it. "I want this" and "I want ...


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The shortcomings one is reasonably easy to deal with - you just make sure you bring that up yourself if you see a shortcoming that you want addressed, or want to address. So if you're not happy with your performance in x area, you make sure you're the proactive one in bringing that up, asking for support, and seeing if there's any recommendations. As for ...


3

Sometimes managers send me a message asking for my resume. This happens more often than you would think and is very far from a job offer. You may not think of your LinkedIn profile as a "looking for a job" advert, as it's intended as a professional social network - but recruiters do. They have a job to do, and that job is to provide a supply of candidates ...


4

Definitely do not communicate with your boss about your interactions on LinkedIn. Those messages are private, intended for you alone, and (nearly) all recruiters will respect that you won't want to communicate anything with your current company until it makes sense to do so (i.e., you're leaving for a better, signed offer). Other excellent answers have ...


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I'm asking if I can do something to make my manager act to keep me happy, before me getting unhappy. I think this is your main point. This is what you need to do: Figure out, what you want. Compare (1) to what your current position offers. If there are unmet demands, talk with your manager about them. If the company is either not willing or not able to ...


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