New answers tagged

2

This is a rather large and complex problem because there may (or may not) be different options that work in different situations - so, it's a little hard to be specific about how you should handle this in the future versus in a specific context. But, that said, you should take some comfort in the fact that you're not alone in this struggle. Many people fresh ...


1

Don't make a decision to find another job just by guessing "what it means" that you got no promotion and no pay increase. I don't mean that your guess is wrong. I just mean you should check it out. You can say, in private, something like this, "Boss, I was very disappointed to get no promotion and no increase. What can I do differently in my work so this ...


0

I would make a plan. (plans are good). From what you are writing IMHO the best way would be to switch team for that salary increase (to compensate for inflation). Don't listen to promises as they are what pave hell's floor. Don't care about promotion in the company. As you write the process is hazy and used to explain lack of it rather than used for one. ...


0

Unrealistic deadlines/goals are just a fact of life for a dev. Everyone wants it now and wants everything working like they thought it should without having to tell you what exactly they need (including all the one off situations :/ ). I work in development myself and all to often my manager likes to promise crazy deadlines. "Oh ya it will be done by next ...


1

Sometimes this behaviour comes from managers who believe in 'increasing pressure until the pip squeaks'. They worry that you're not working hard enough, and think that setting arbitrary goals will motivate you. I find that the best defence is to point out that under pressure, developers cause more bugs and testers miss problems. It's the managers' job to ...


0

Here are two things you can try: When a meeting is going off-track, point it out. If it's a few people discussing something in detail that doesn't concern the rest of you, ask if they could leave that issue for a separate meeting, so the rest of you can get on with the rest of the agenda. When someone interrupts you and gives you a new task, ask where it ...


0

What can you personally do about this, as a relatively new member of the company? Get yourself a little better organized. You can't change the behavior of other people, only yourself. (That will probably change over time as you gain seniority.) You have more work to do each day than you can finish. That's perfectly normal in the workplace. With respect, ...


1

If you are a Project Manager Proper management is not done by discussions. Is by having a very clear list of problems, proper analysis to be done by the proper people in the project, tasks assigned. Bug management systems do that generally. They can be used for coffee machine replacements or chair repairs too, if nothing better exists. The project in those ...


18

You probably can't. I've been down this road before. Last place I worked, the VP came around and said "the CTO says we have to fix all bugs within 90 days." As we did scrum and I had a backlog and team velocity, I did some quick calculations for my team and the other directors' teams, and said "At the current rate of clearing bugs with the current team that ...


0

He is 'get it done' kind of guy. He never plans, calls randomly anytime during the day, ask for random favor in terms of work, never is available to discuss when I want to, commit what is not possible, changes commitment on the fly, etc. None of that is necessarily an issue (or not necessarily your issue, anyway.) You just need to learn to work with it. ...


6

It's only temporary. Be nice to them and try to help them out. Firstly it's boss's family and secondly there is zero need to antagonise this person. It's just a temporary position for them, not worth a lot of bother but the people will be remembered.


35

Give that person something to do. The spouse knows they haven't been selected because they're competent; they've been selected because they were available, and for lack of a better option. They need to keep up the illusion of competence, while knowing they can't really be productive in any way for lack of experience, and they don't have the knowledge to ...


2

You are ambitious and want to advance. That is good. Most companies like it when employees want to take more responsibility. Instead of "fighting" for your advancement, I suggest you ask for advice. "What can I do to prepare myself for more responsibilities here at Initrode?" If you can find a mentor who is not your manager, that might be helpful. A ...


6

Consider that at will works in both directions. If your employer doesn't like you, they can get rid of you (as long as it's not for something protected, like age, race, etc). Similarly, if you're unhappy with your employer, you're totally free to go work elsewhere without repercussions. Of course, reality is often more complicated than that, but it can be ...


1

If capability isn't valued and you feel yourself capable, then you should start to look for other employment opportunities. whatever comes out of the current situation, this company seems to be a bad fit for you in the long run. Do whatever keeps you employed while searching for a company that's capability-driven, there are many of them out there. Good ...


3

Is playing in the game room during working hours that important to you? If so, then talk to your manager and see if you can work out an arrangement so that you can have your play time during working hours. If he won't budge, then maybe this is not the right company for you. If it's not that important to you, then just drop the issue, forget about who ...


0

It depends what authority the manager has been given in your company and if they have any say over how you use your working hours. The manager may or may not have permission to stop you entering the game room during your personal time (lunch breaks). I would suggest sending back an email asking your manager to further clarify what the guidelines are. Saying ...


24

Restricting game room usage is definitely not something unreasonable. It seems that your team abused the privilege and is now paying for it. Moving forward, team leads and even regular employees should have learned to not overuse privileges to show leadership by talking to interns about unprofessional behaviour, before it reaches management. Show ...


2

I'm not sure that anyone can answer the "how/why can this happen?" question, since company culture and the reasons and restrictions on stuff like a game room are as variable as the company's themselves. The best way to get an answer is to start asking w/in your company. Here's how I'd go about that: Talk to your direct manager face to face and in ...


-9

A Manager citing a nonexisting guideline to back up his decision is a sure sign of trouble to come, doubly so if this is just because of some individuals overuse of the room, not because of a generaly problematic team habit. Thats totally unprofessional behaviour and shows unwillingness to take responsibility for his actions himself. Get in touch with his ...


12

My question is how should I approach my manager about this or even if I should? I suggest you approach your manager, in private, and try the following: Hello, manager. Last time I heard the product being described in a way I am not familiar with, and also mentioned some other features the product does not currently have. I feel like I am ...


6

In my view, 1 week is far to early to be making this judgment about the role. I wouldn't expect you to be writing any code in the first week on a new code base and a system you are not familiar with. Reviewing and documenting bugs is a good way to get you exposed to the system and to get a feel for the pain points. If you are going to approach your ...


14

I have given it enough time at x, as I originally thought that I needed to give the role some time but now I’m sure I need to say something. Ask the right questions, and they'll quickly lead to a frank conversation if it's not something you're expected to be doing. Hi Peter, I've found x issue in production - it seems both reasonably simple to solve and ...


3

she would call me to schedule my first shift but it's been 9 days and I'm supposed to be starting in 5 days and she still hasn't called me, what should I do? Communicate. Communication is the key. The ideal time to get in touch was yesterday, get in touch as soon as possible. If you have got a number, call them up. Otherwise, send an email politely ...


5

My boss at one job forgot that I was outside for an hour on my first day I was sitting in the lobby where I was told to wait. The assistant had told my boss that I was there, but in between leaving his office and coming to get me, someone needed him for something, after which he returned to his office. I had to give him a call to remind him that I was ...


0

How can I deal with such a situation? Send a respectful email to other stake holders (Boss's boss, HR, etc) and just inform your decision that you need to leave in 5 days. Offer your best you can, wish them good luck but just stay firm and clear that you have to leave and you are ready to pay-out. Point out to the clause in your contract if needed. (If it ...


9

You should have checked your contract before agreeing to pay for the notice period. Assuming you're in India, the contracts usually have a condition that either party (you or the organization) can pay the amount equivalent to the notice period salary in lieu of actually serving (resignation) / allowing to serve (termination) the notice period. However, ...


-3

If you previously signed a contract requiring two weeks notice, then your employer can insist on you working for two weeks after you have notified them of your resignation. Is there a clause which allows you to pay your employer money (?) instead of working the two weeks? If not, then it's not possible. I've never heard of such a thing in the US.


0

What you are asked to do is unethical. When you are asked to do something unethical, you can: 1. Convince them that it shouldn't be done. No negative consequences for you. 2. Refuse to do it. Best case some other employee does it, worst case you are fired. 3. Do it and live with your bad conscience. So option 1. is very much preferable. You also think what ...


0

There are answers here addressing either the legality or the ethical aspect. At the end of the day I read your question as such: To me it feels wrong to do this, is there a basis in ethics or legal department supporting this feeling of mine? I'd say if something feels wrong to you, you'd better not do it, because you have to live with yourself and be ...


-4

tl;dr you're in the wrong, you don't know what ethics is, and you're being paid to be an engineer not provide philosophical guidance. There are other answers that talk about if it is ethical or not - this answer just says "you're not informed enough to know what ethics is". You - OP - fundamentally do not understand what "ethics" is. Ethics has a rich ...


1

You are being ethical "and" annoying As the skilled labor, what you should be ding is certain: You should inform your manager about the legal consequences of his request, let him know about the copyright laws. If you want you can spice it up with ethics too - although it would be weird in your case, as most corporations steals from each other the second ...


8

Disclaimer I am not lawyer, and I do not provide legal advice. The below statements are based on my personal experience and research with copyright'd material. Copyright Infringement (in the US) Making a work, based on your competitors existing work is considered creating a derivative work. If you do not have explicit permission (license) to create the ...


1

I wanted to add that "look and feel" which is what you're being asked to copy has been used as the basis for claims of copyright infringement. Your boss may be incorrect in his assertion that it can't be copyrighted especially if it looks exactly the same as the other product with different colors. I think it's every employee's responsibility to surface ...


1

I would like to point out that most while look-and-feel cases almost never win, the copyright lawyers I've worked with have posed the question; is the intent to confuse the consumer about the two products, and given the information you gave us, then I would say yes. So I think they probably could sue you and win were you to literally copy it 1:1, especially ...


3

Unethical I personally would feel that it's unethical, but I would also try to create an alternative mockup which solves the same problem, but without being a direct copy. Perhaps start out by creating a mockup that you might make if you had never seen any version of the tool at all. Then iterate it a bit, and take into consideration the design elements ...


6

I'm going to assume your boss is non-technical and when he said he wants a 1:1 copy, he is simply talking about he wants the same aesthetic and perhaps behavior mimic. He is not asking you to reverse-engineer the webpage and steal code or content. I base this on my own personal decade long experience in the field and in multiple times was asked to "copy" ...


33

You asked about ethics (and I would consider this unethical, but that's just a personal reaction). However, your boss and his boss should consider the legal implications of the "Trade Dress" doctrine, which specifically says that copying the unique appearance of someone else's product is not permitted. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trade_dress I am no ...


5

It is not unethical. It is just business. The other company is a market leader and the idea behind copying this tool is if it works for them it will work for us. Businesses do this all the time and there is no problem. It is part of how a competitive market functions. I explained I am concerned about the ethics behind doing this. My boss got ...


25

I think most, if not all of the answers provided are missing the main point. The main question is "is it UNETHICAL" to copy 1:1 the UI developed by another company?" The answer is 100% YES, it is unethical to do so. The counter to this argument has been that if it is not copyright material it is fair game. I am no lawyer, but that might not be necessarily ...


6

Your initial reaction was good. It's always good to keep ethics in mind with any workplace request. However, once they expressed that it isn't a copyright or trademark infringement issue, then you were in the wrong to continue refusing to comply with the request. Unless you're the legal department and thus know objectively and factually that it actually is ...


2

Abusive employers exist, and a HR department knows that. I imagine they may even have a well defined way to handle that. If the alternative is canceling the application, I would certainly just be straight forward and honestly explain the situation. You can be totally relaxed with that, because it will not create any problem in itself. The outcome can be ...


2

I think you’re right to make sure there’s no nefarious intent (IE breaching copyright or trying to pass your calculator off as theirs) but other than that, copying good ideas is a good thing. If there’s a company that does something better than you do, why not emulate them? Would you refuse to use a good idea just because you weren’t the one who thought of ...


95

TL;DR You were right in asking the question about copyright, and you can raise more question if the answer is not satisfactory, but after you received a clarification which you seem to agree with, but still refusing to work on the action item is wrong, it can be seen as insubordination. To elaborate, the way I read it: there is an idea to be implemented, ...


6

Mine will be kind of a non-answer, but, you say this new opportunity will be a great boost to your career, and of course, you're the best judge of that, but to me, it sounds like they are, or at the very least their HR department is, highly unprofessional. Who, in their right mind, heard about a prospecting employer getting in touch with your current one?! ...


61

Don't provide a solution, just provide the constraints. You're one step ahead, but in the wrong direction. You don't have to provide a solution to their request. Just let them know of the problem. Tell HR about your current boss and that your current employer is not aware of you seeking a job elsewhere. Be careful to not call your current boss abusive, but ...


0

Have HR in your new company contact HR in your current company, instead of contacting the manager directly. This is generally how it should work anyway - communications about employment matters should be channelled through HR. HR at your current place then request a reference from your manager, who passes it back to HR. When I've written references for ...


1

If your current manager has told more than one person, maybe those people can be used as references and also to explain what is going on and why you are leaving. Considering what a predicament you are in, the new employer should be willing to listen to these people. I would write an email to them and say just that, you are in a predicament and you trying to ...


17

You don't have to withdraw, but you have to be open with the hiring manager, explaining the situation like you did here. Hopefully, they will not go against your wishes. You are in academia. Perhaps you have collaborators that are on the same professional level as your current boss, and they can vouch for you.


Top 50 recent answers are included