New answers tagged

1

I wouldn't call my self an experience expert here, but I'm surprised not to see someone suggesting that you talk to your team, understand why they choose the hours they do and what their underlying interests are. For example, one may be taking children to/from childcare or school, another may be caring for an elderly relative, another might be flying off to ...


1

We had a similar situation with flexible hours and a distributed team and dealt with it by having standups at a specific time where people were most likely to be around, but on a specific Slack channel. Standups were either via video if people were working from home, or just by text chat. We also did traditional face-to-face standups when attendance made it ...


-1

The problem is your setup. Given that the flakiness of your coworkers is now established, insist on this. Have this meeting in a physical conference room When you get one of these on your calendar, reserve a conference room with a phone and tell all employees the room. Go to the physical conference room at the appointed time. Wait until you have a ...


6

Here's your checklist for when this happens. Call, Skype, IM, or otherwise attempt to get ahold of the missing associate. If there is no answer, or he shows up as away, contact his manager and see if they can reach him via some alternative number. If you only have one desk phone, you can use your personal cell phone, or ask someone at the desk next to you ...


4

If you are invited to the meeting, then you should be professional and not be silent if you are the sole representative of your company. If your colleagues are not being professional, that will reflect poorly on them in the long run. Focus on how you can make the company (and you) look good and professional. That said, when I am in this situation I will ...


6

The other answers are much more optimal, but here is a technical fix until you resolve things internally: If you are using a company phone or smartphone, it's very likely that you can place the call on hold. It's not very professional to place a client on hold (for the reason of finding your coworkers), but it's certainly much better than doing nothing.


22

If your co-worker is leading the meeting, then let them initiate the call to the customer and you. That way you are not on the phone looking poor. If the call is not initiated, then you contact the co-worker to find out why and suggest they should contact the customer. If this happens more than once then you should give the details to your manager.


33

This is why I always reach out to the meeting lead before joining a call. If you're the lead obviously get on the call, maybe send a quick email/slack to whoever else you need on the call as a reminder, but if not just make sure the lead is ready to start the call before going on. You mentioned they might not have seen the meeting request:Did you double ...


97

Talk to your boss before the next meeting and ask what you should do in the case that your coworker cannot make it to the meeting for whatever reason. There is no need to mention that your coworker is frequently missing meetings. Follow the boss's instructions if the situation happens again. Normally I would simply tell the customer that it looks like X ...


10

I'll give two pieces of advice: Since you're to be the "silent participant", do you really need to be attending the meeting? Mostly, a email follow up (CC-ed to you) would suffice. In that case, you don't need to be in the meeting, let the primary participant answer for themselves for the "no-show". If you're one of the expected participants, and you need ...


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