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0

Speak to your doctor about it. It's possible that this sensitivity to the sound of people eating is the result of a disability like misophonia or the sensory aspects of autism spectrum disorder. If you can get a written diagnosis for either condition (or some other condition that might also cause it), then you can give it to HR and ask them about getting ...


2

It sounds like you have Misophonia. If you aren't aware already, Misophonia is a proper psychiatric condition, altough it's not widely known. Because of this, most people don't actually understand you and how you feel when you are exposed to trigger sounds. I suffer from Misophonia, too. I know that trigger sound aren't just something mildy irritating ...


1

You should go to half of them because management does push for "team building" activities, I'm a developer, a management minor, but also an introvert. Team building is a goal of management. You should go to some of these events, or at least show up for an hour, have a beer and do some smalltalk. This is part of the corporate world. If you do not meet ...


1

You didn't mention how your manager schedules these meetings. I have had similar issues. We rely on Outlook for scheduling. I have found for my own sanity that blocking off the time on my calendar for the lunch period, hours before work, and hours after work when I am generally not available has helped keep people from scheduling inconvenient meetings.


14

Lunch meetings work best when most people are just eating while one person (at a time) is presenting something that doesn't need 100% attention. If everyone is eating, you'd expect long periods where no one is talking. The problem here could be that the boss is picking subjects where everyone needs to jump into the conversation, even when they have a ...


2

Do not underestimate the value of team bonding exercises, they can help build valuable professional relationship that you can rely upon later. If you don't enjoy the activities planned, you can always find activities that you enjoy, and propose it to the team that this is what you would like to bond over. It could be anything that you enjoy, which you think ...


0

Just say sorry and then repeat the information you understood 100% and then wait for them to repeat the rest. Repeat until you get it all. No big discussion about why you didn't undestand it, maybe a jokingly "thanks, much easier to understand when you don't chew a pizza at the same time". If you know some funny way how you teach children not to talk with ...


8

You're under no obligation to go, especially if the activities are after work hours. If management is organizing events then you can simply decline, but they will keep including you, not much you can do about that. If pressed just say you're going to pass. If coworkers invite you, once you decline a few times they will eventually get the hint, if not just ...


5

I've so far been honest with my manager about the reason I do not go to events with activities You already have the solution, just continue being honest. All advice is very welcome. My advice would be to actually attend one just to see what it's like, they can be fun sometimes. It doesn't obligate you to attend them all, but it may make you shift your ...


1

All my colleagues seem to understand that not everyone likes these kind of get togethers and some do not like them themselves but they find excuses not to go. So find a similar excuse not to go. Keep it simple. Something like "Sorry, I'm busy then." or "I don't do [whatever the activity happens to be]" or even "I can't." should work. Eventually, ...


6

how do I stop these requests/demands for my attendance? You probably cannot stop this. If the company continues to hold events, they will likely continue to invite everyone. The fact that you may have declined every event so far does not matter. From the company's perspective you may change your mind one day. Also, if they selectively invite employees ...


8

Best solution: Talk to your boss You should politely reiterate to your boss how much this bothers you. "Seeming rude" is often in our own perception. Hey, Boss, got a second? I love that we have a weekly meeting to hear from each other, and I'm worried I'm not able to engage fully because I can't hear what people are saying when they chew and talk. Not ...


75

While probably not what you want to hear, when one has a unique aversive objection to something that is a widespread social norm within an industry and cannot realistically be argued to be harmful, the best solution may be trying to mitigate the sensitivity, rather than to change other's behavior. Of course what is considered a norm and what is offensive is ...


1

The failure that matters here is not your coworkers failure to do his assigned task. It is your failure to coordinate the project. As others have said, you need to be ready to talk about what you did wrong, what you learned from it, and what you would do differently in the future. It's unlikely that the solution is just "I should have reported my coworker ...


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