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2

If you think you're being productive but your manager doesn't, you probably don't understand his priorities, or are missing something he thinks is important. It's also possible that he's not noticing the things you have done if it wasn't the one thing he wanted done. Use these meetings to find out what he expects you to do today. Then at the next meeting ...


3

One thing to remember in these kind of meetings is, that the CEO is not talking to an employee if he or she is answering your question. The answer isn't even adressed to the group of people it concerns. The CEO is talking to the whole audience. But more importantly you are talking to the audience as wellnot only to your CEO. So if you critizise in these ...


4

I propose two-step process: Ask non-sensitive question: "CEO, what is the best way to discuss sensitive topics?" Using information from (1) bring up sensitive topics The theory is that you ask about process first, because it seems there is no process right now. There are some suggestions, but not expectations. As others answered, it is not useful to bring ...


7

Maybe I am too cynical. The main goal of this meeting is to keep all informed about relevant news regarding the company and to have a dialog between the CEO and the employees. No, it isn't. In practice it is a [monologue] from the CEO, who always tells how good everything is. Yep, like I said. Last time a manager told us that we should talk ...


5

So is it a good idea to talk about workplace improvements at all? If no one else, including your manager, is willing to bring up these topics then why should you put yourself at risk? It sounds good in theory, but I would not be the first person to ask the CEO a question that might make them look bad or feel uncomfortable. How can you start talking ...


49

You left a comment saying: I don't know... he can see all my progress on our Kanban board. I have never been told why we're having these meetings. So instead of jumping to conclusions about being targeted, ask. This is a chance for you to show your competence and initiative by getting a better understanding of what your managers are trying to accomplish....


63

TLDR: Adjust your attitude, use the meetings to your benefit. The meeting basically sounds similar to a daily standup. Those are commonly done in Agile development processes in addition to Jira boards, as personal information can be far more detailed, filtered and allow for better feedback/questions than a board could. So such a meeting can well make sense. ...


15

daily meetings with himself and his manager This makes things a lot easier for you. Just be really complient about anything your manager asks, but at the same time point out that he should/could already know it without the meeting. Bring your laptop to the meeting and project the kanban board. (Or if you don't have a laptop ask the manager if he can ...


3

And you're sure these aren't regular "stand up" meetings? (They don't sound like it, if it's just you and 2 managers). Create a Jira task for "daily update meeting" and log work (time) against it. If it gets moved, log the additional time in between if its insufficient for you to get anything meaningful done. What you're looking to achieve is to document ...


3

Take control of the meetings. If he can't lead these meetings in an efficient and productive manner, then you have to. On the next Monday (or first meeting of the week), go through your Jira list as normal and as efficiently as possible. Then directly move into your workload for the rest of the week, telling him what work items you have and how long they ...


6

DarkCygnus answer is good if you really don't want anyone else to see the bear, but if you want to minimize perceived weirdness from other people you should probably just suck it up. The gift sounds a little bit quirky, but also funny and nice. Stealing it back or even just being embarrassed about it later would likely be seen as a lot weirder than giving ...


5

The next time you’re late to a meeting, as an apology you should say “sorry I’m late for the meeting”. That’s it. No presents. Ever.


16

What should I do? If you are not comfortable with him putting the Bear there, I suggest you approach him and tell him about it. Try in his office, or wherever you seem fit, and ask for a quick private talk. Express to him that the gift was intended for him as an apology, and that it is embarrassing for you that it is displayed in front of everybody. Any ...


3

My boss expected me to attend a meeting I was never informed about existed. I'm not going to just assume things exist without reason and ask for have any meetings without reason. If you are not getting informed about meetings- I would ask your boss if you can be added for email chains for those kinds of things. Recurring meetings usually have the same ...


0

You go to the meeting, as soon as you learn about it. And afterwards you ask your boss how you can make sure that you know about these types of meetings in advance.


1

This happens to me as well. I believe it is very common for many other people especially when meetings are bore and they make it is mandatory for you to attend one. In this case I generally take a break (everyone has right to take break for nature's call), go washroom, wash your face fully for two-three times, drink water and come back.


0

You may have ADD/ADHD. I used to yawn several times an hour after being awake for only two hours. Napping helped but too many hours needed. I was diagnosed with ADHD, got the right meds (it can take a few tries). I no longer yawn, far more present, and able to take on many more tasks.


5

I did some research on this during my bachelor's. It's been a while (2012), so I'll see if I can source this, but no promises. Yawning correlates with the time of day, and how long you have been sedentary. Exercise situationally surpresses yawning. Yawning is contagious, and this effect correlates with group cohesion: You are more likely to yawn in a group ...


2

I've found that clenching my jaw just enough to prevent the jaw from moving into a yawn works well. I've also found ways to prevent the rest of my face from showing strains of yawning. You can also put you hand on your face in a "thinking" posture to help hide your intentions. Make sure your mouth stays closed while doing this, and you'll muffle any sound ...


1

It depends on the situation, but I would sometimes work on something else to keep from being bored. If you have a laptop that you can bring to the meeting, it is easy. No computer? Use a notebook, outline the solution to a problem, make a to-do list, etc. Just don't become so immersed in your work that you appear to be ignoring the meeting. Take time to ...


2

If you're not strictly needed at these meetings, then don't go to the meetings anymore (get yourself taken off the invite list). If you are supposed to be in the meeting, then do your best to pay attention to what's being said. Being bored and yawning means that you're missing something that might well be important. Yawning in a meeting (or badly ...


11

You can stop yawning through breathing in through your nose and out through the mouth. Breathing in through your nose cools blood vessels in your head that help stop you from yawning. Other advice would be to find techniques to feel more awake, such as getting out of bed without hitting snooze, drinking plenty water throughout the day, do exercise 3-4 ...


3

If this is occurring in the US, a lot of people go to lunch right at noon. Because it's usual to take an hour lunch, scheduling a meeting at 1 pm probably makes sense to someone who eats at noon. It also has the benefit of keeping the rest of the group on the roughly the same schedule. I prefer to eat later, myself, so the day is broken up more evenly and ...


1

You didn't mention what type of environment you're in (consulting, startup, corporate, etc), but I often see this in the consulting world, where time is tracked as billable. Team meetings aren't billable to clients, which means that people try to limit them and/or schedule them during times when people aren't doing billable work. This results in team ...


11

If they're like some companies I've worked for, that's when they can find an available time for everyone. They probably don't prefer the time...it's just when they can get a free hour for everyone. Don't like it? Speak up directly and tell them this isn't a good time, or block your time on the calendar


3

Many answers here, but I wanted to suggest a specific strategy at bars. Alcoholic drinks are consumed slowly over time. If you order a normal soft drink like Coca Cola you are likely to finish three glasses in the time that the people drinking alcohol finish one. I have taken to ordering ginger beer, which is like ginger ale but much heavier on the ginger....


1

What else than 'grab coffee' or 'have a beer' can I invoke as an opener to meet? "let's go get a drink" or "we should have a drink sometime" are generic phrase that leaves the choice of beverage open. But coffee vs. beer also implies a time of day and atmosphere, which might matter if you don't mean right now. The "drinks" phrasing does imply alcoholic ...


5

First, I'm a beer AND coffee enthusiast and homebrewer but not a heavy drinker myself. I have mountains of respect for those who, even in a pro-alcohol culture, avoid alcohol. So, please never feel the need to drink in order to drive your social and/or professional life - you're doing the right thing. That said, I suggest herbal teas sweetened or ...


3

I would say that, by far, the most important thing to do in these scenarios is to be honest with your coworkers as you have been here. Your coworkers are inviting you to these activities to informally build a relationship with you. A large part of that relationship is trust. You can find analogues of these micro-team-building exercises across civilizations ...


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