New answers tagged

1

This has happened to me recently. I had personal issues affecting my work. It happens, and your manager will understand. I chose to talk to my manager, I told him what this personal issues where (your call, you don't have to explain: I trust my manager, so I told him) and I told him I was doing my best to avoid it affecting too much the workplace. I also ...


5

I am currently under a lot of stress from different sources that are not interesting to mention on workplace but i am in a battle with myself. The first port of call here should be to speak with a medical professional; they can make a proper assessment and advise on the best course of action medically (far better than anyone can here.) Two reasons for this -...


0

Yes, (most) managers are human, and you do not want them to get the wrong idea. It is perfectly understandable that over the course of your career/life, you will have ups and downs, and your manager should know that. A simple one-to-one discussion where you say something like "Hey boss, I am currently dealing with personal issues (no need to give too much ...


2

I see what the employer is trying to do here - they are trying to avoid having the expense and hassle of putting someone through vetting if they are going to fail it. And really they are doing so with reasonable intentions. But that doesn't mean it's okay as I discussed in my answer here these sorts of questions are normal and valid for security vetting ...


-4

GDPR restrictions Any answers relating to "signs of mental or physical illness" is health data, which falls under the scope of GDPR Article 9 "Processing of special categories of personal data". Much stricter than the protection of 'ordinary' personal data, handling such data is prohibited by default (Article 9.1) unless particular specific exceptional ...


7

These references aren't standard, run of the mill references that employers request every time you move between jobs. These are specifically in relation for security vetting, and the entire purpose will to see whether or not you are suitable to be given access to Security Cleared documentation and work on particular projects. I would suggest this is likely ...


4

Just as a general point: Your current employer can ask your former employer whatever they like. Whether your former employer can legally answer in any kind of detail is another matter. Whether they would answer in that kind of detail is another still. Most employers, in order to avoid the potential for lawsuits, won't confirm anything beyond job titles ...


3

That word sensitive is evocative. This sort of question is exactly what FBI or OPM agents are checking into when doing a security clearance investigation for a potential US government employee. Although everyone agrees this sort of questioning is uncomfortable, I certainly wouldn’t take it personally. Your employer — which may well be a government agency or ...


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