152

As my study of this situation, there are other problems, actual problems that needs to be investigated. People simply don't get demotivated for working 2+ years on the same project, they get demotivated when they either feel They are not valued Their work is not valued Their opinion is not valued They don't see any growth opportunity for their personal as ...


62

Any suggestions on how can I motivate them? Hack days are a great way to motivate devs. Once a month allow the team to spend their Thursday afternoon working on a hack project. Ask your boss for a budget to buy beer and pizza. Start by brainstorming R&D ideas, what new tech do they want to try out? what cool thing could you build with your combined ...


55

how do you deal with this conflict once it has been decided that this is something that must go ahead, if you feel strongly against the change? My way of dealing with this is considering what my role in the company is. Am I there as a developer? As an analyst? As a team lead? As a project manager? If I'm the developer (which I surmise you are), then you ...


49

As a job-hopper myself, I can testimony about reasons my motivation go down when being in the same project over a long time. This usually has little to do with pay or recognition of my work: Working in the same project over a long time lacks of learning opportunities. There is a lot to learn from changing: you learn how projects are different and how they ...


34

You've expressed your idea clearly and they decided they did not want to accept your decision and this bothers you. Well of course it bothers you. You've made an excellent case for a particular technology to be used and they flat out denied it. Though remember that politics are always at play, and you cannot understand all the underlying reasons behind ...


18

It's a completely understandable reaction and a human one. You know you tried to influence the decision making process, you tried your hardest, and things didn't end up as you think they should. What I find with a lot of things is if I understand everybody wants the best outcome, it makes it easier for me. If I can work with a bunch of people who are ...


14

First answer: Don't talk about lack of motivation. Talk about wasted work. You cannot produce anything useful without guidance. That means that you going without guidance is wasting the time and money of the company. That really is the core of your problem, and it's one that will resonate better than vague stuff about motivation. Second answer: It ...


12

this time he insists on this pattern Then give him what he wants. He usually finds a solution satisfactory to everyone but this time is different for whatever reason. There must be a reasonable explanation on why your boss has done this. So complete the task the way he wants and do your job as it should be done. You're not always going to agree on things ...


10

Do the work you are told, but make sure your plan of attack and its complete disregard is documented. When you are inevitably questioned for a dumb design later due to internal and external user rage you can use it to protect yourself since it was clearly not your idea. You can do this by getting your boss to explicitly state what he wants over what you ...


10

You can stop yawning through breathing in through your nose and out through the mouth. Breathing in through your nose cools blood vessels in your head that help stop you from yawning. Other advice would be to find techniques to feel more awake, such as getting out of bed without hitting snooze, drinking plenty water throughout the day, do exercise 3-4 ...


9

Addressing this solely from the psychological stance asked for, I find there are a few things that help me get over a "bad choice" (in my opinion). The first is simply a little time - if I have to start coding the "wrong thing" immediately, my mind is replaying all of the arguments against this, not trying to see the best way to create it. Usually if I ...


8

Aside from temporary fixes like sending them to meetups, or other "gamey" approaches: Those people need a new project, period. They presumably are highly intelligent technical people, who like to play with technology and projects. Nothing you can feasibly do will change that (and you do not want to change it anyways). If you give them the same stuff to do ...


7

How can I get over this feeling that I have been screwed and move on? [...] I really need to focus on getting a new job and support my family. I have two kids in college and tuition :) I suggest you follow your advice on that last sentence as motivation to get over this situation. As you said, you have family and people that depends on you, so there ...


7

Burnout is a real problem in the software industry. If you can’t find or make time outside of work for personally rewarding projects, try discussing with your management the needs for you to spend a half day or day a week learning something new. Even if they allow it, you might want to seriously think about going to a new company for a few reasons: A change ...


7

Does your boss give you any feedback? If he did and you didn't follow the advice then it's kind of your fault but if he just said "No, its crap do it again" then you should probably find a new job. Also by what you have written it seems that your boss okays the concept but then rejects the final product, maybe try working on the concept a little longer ...


6

Please be very careful with metrics of this type. They can backfire badly if the metrics used don't translate into something that benefits the company. In my previous employer, incentive programs were created for customer facing employees. They really didn't have anything to do with the bottom-line. This bank ran into major problems in 2016 with employees ...


6

Figure out what or who are you angry at. At the east coast team whose delays got the project scrapped? At your employer for not giving you advanced warning? At yourself for not seeing the signs, for not being prepared? At your kids for going to college? At God? At life? At universe? At your current situation? You are angry at the east coast team. You feel ...


5

Pay the man or offer him a share of the business. Cool tech alone is a very lousy motivation. You'll sometimes find fresh people who are willing to work for free for a very short amount of time in order for them to build a portfolio that they can display. That's obviously not the case here and even if it were you couldn't expect someone to do that for a ...


5

If I check back on reasons why I took on new challenges, here's the reasons, and what would have had to change in order for me to stay: Using an ancient stack that would never have had been modernized in any way. There was nothing new to learn, which spells death for a developer's career. What should have changed: Migrate to a more modern stack to keep it ...


4

How can I keep him motivated while he's basically volunteering his time for me during these "startup" phases? Probably he is losing his motivation because, as you mentioned in comments, this person already has another job that actually pays him, and his effort and time should go there in order to complete his responsibilities and keep his job. This person ...


4

Simple concept: "feeling" is not a driver for a change (or lack thereof). It is a fact driven event. Given there are enough facts to support the change, it'll happen, despite you like it or not. You need to learn how to work with a team, and also need to learn, how to adjust yourself with a rejection. Remember this: you don't "own" anything in a team ...


4

I am prone to this problem myself. Easily find myself demotivated due to boredom. The reason I stayed the longest in my ex-company was because they keep me challenged and I was free to explore new things. Here's a few suggestions: Hack days Ask the engineers to explore new things that indirectly contributes to the development. If they have not setup CI/CD ...


4

I did some research on this during my bachelor's. It's been a while (2012), so I'll see if I can source this, but no promises. Yawning correlates with the time of day, and how long you have been sedentary. Exercise situationally surpresses yawning. Yawning is contagious, and this effect correlates with group cohesion: You are more likely to yawn in a group ...


4

From a graphic designer with similar experience. A sole GD cannot be expected to produce a fresh/unique/outstanding project. You might get the odd idea here and there but the job burden is just to much to execute them. I would advise to look for, what I consider, red flags: are they giving you any feedback (and "fix it" "not like that" "something different" ...


3

The typical draw for working for free on a startup is the possibility of getting rich. It's actually a pretty good motivation, and one that you aren't offering. Assuming this guy is good, he can get a job paying him somewhere around $100K/year. You're capping the possible reward there. You're saying that, if he works hard and everything works out, he ...


3

In the military (as with any other multi-department organisation) there's going to be pros and cons to work in different departments. At the moment it sounds like the biggest downside to being in the IT Corps for you is that you don't get quite as much leave and you don't feel like you are getting the individual recognition you feel you deserve. I'm not ...


3

On the project I lead, I split up the tasks and used a spiral development cycle. The tasks were small so that each developer would get a sense of accomplishment. The tasks were ordered into milestones. Each milestone to show something tangible, for example, getting a "Hello World" printing on an embedded device (this was used to get the development ...


3

I do not know the design world so I will try to see this more as a project management situation. As a Graphic Designer in a digital marketing and design agency, do I have to deal with it, doesn't matter it's too bad for you and your self esteem? You will always deal with undecided people, your goal is to understand the need and find a work-around the ...


2

Find him a mentor and have them work together on projects. They can sit side by side when doing anything non-trivial. This will keep show the employee what the work expectation is and also keep them on task. It may also improve the mentor's work as well.


2

Some work to live Some live to work Different horses for different courses. You cannot force a person to be one way or the other. Also some people are happy are just happy turning up and doing the same job every day. Please do not impose your values on others.


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