194

Ask him what he wants. Seriously, ask him what he wants. You said that the pay wouldn't change, so it's not the money. You said that he wouldn't want to manage anybody, so that's not that either. Is this only about the title? Or is it about decision making power over his work? Find out what it is. If it's only a title, give it to him. In fact, ask him ...


152

As my study of this situation, there are other problems, actual problems that needs to be investigated. People simply don't get demotivated for working 2+ years on the same project, they get demotivated when they either feel They are not valued Their work is not valued Their opinion is not valued They don't see any growth opportunity for their personal as ...


120

Now, I should not care. I am not their boss and their work does not directly impact mine, so objectively there is no reason for me to be annoyed by this, but the fact that I feel that I make a bigger effort than them in our small company to achieve success does bothers me. Clearly this is about your feelings, and feelings are personal. What helped me ...


81

However, he wants to be promoted to the Director level (two levels below mine) and did apply for such a position. The committee rejected him because he is a star technical contributor, but seemingly has never demonstrated any real interest in management. Directors usually manage 3-5 employees. That's a bullshit reason. How much more interest in the job can ...


72

The situation you're describing is tough. Layoffs have a very real impact on both the individuals that are let go and those that remain. I'm sorry you're experiencing this. Here are some things to consider that may help you and your colleagues cope with the added stress and emotions following a layoff: Acknowledge the layoff and the feelings of your ...


67

He won’t say a word during sprint planning, “doesn’t know how” to solve certain problems, and has stopped checking other co-workers code, allowing bugs to flood into production (the dev team he is on is a mess which just revealed itself). It reads like you were not fully aware of the extent of his contribution, enough to cover for the whole dev team, and ...


62

Any suggestions on how can I motivate them? Hack days are a great way to motivate devs. Once a month allow the team to spend their Thursday afternoon working on a hack project. Ask your boss for a budget to buy beer and pizza. Start by brainstorming R&D ideas, what new tech do they want to try out? what cool thing could you build with your combined ...


62

Nothing easier. Stop presuming that you are a virtuous person Obviously, your entire position here rests on the presumption that you are a good guy, honorable and hard working. From that high horse, you judge everyone else. And you presume that judgment is also virtuous. You don't even think about this; you just take it for granted. Another person ...


55

how do you deal with this conflict once it has been decided that this is something that must go ahead, if you feel strongly against the change? My way of dealing with this is considering what my role in the company is. Am I there as a developer? As an analyst? As a team lead? As a project manager? If I'm the developer (which I surmise you are), then you ...


50

As a job-hopper myself, I can testimony about reasons my motivation go down when being in the same project over a long time. This usually has little to do with pay or recognition of my work: Working in the same project over a long time lacks of learning opportunities. There is a lot to learn from changing: you learn how projects are different and how they ...


37

You want a bit of an off-the-wall suggestion? Make him a Project Manager for a small-sized project. Right now, you and your employee have a disconnect and believe two diametrically different things. He believes that he'd be a good leader. You don't - and from everything you've laid out, you're very likely the one that's rooted in reality. But that's the ...


34

You've expressed your idea clearly and they decided they did not want to accept your decision and this bothers you. Well of course it bothers you. You've made an excellent case for a particular technology to be used and they flat out denied it. Though remember that politics are always at play, and you cannot understand all the underlying reasons behind ...


34

Jay's list is already good, I'd like to add one point from personal observation from when I was laid off: As a survivor, do not feel guilty. Assuming you did not personally pick who should stay and who should go, don't feel responsible for it. Don't feel like you have to tread lightly or be any different from the day before the layoff with the people you ...


22

I think the root of your problem is something that's common to a lot of companies. From the viewpoint of management, managers are usually seen as much more important to the company than technical people, and are more highly compensated - not just with money, but with status, perks, and promotion prospects. From the viewpoint of technical people, managers ...


22

Some really good answers already, but I think there is one important part missing: It's up to the leadership of the company to "sell" the layoff to the rest of the employees. A layoff is an indication that something went massively wrong, so the leadership owes the employees an explanation. That explanation should include: What happened and why? What were ...


20

Having been in this situation many times, the answer is as you implied: it's not your job to care, so, don't. It is your manager's job to assess performance of your colleagues, not yours. Presumably, your manager has some way of measuring performance in a consistent manner (tickets, call times, sales, something relevant to the job you do), and also less ...


20

Well, on one hand, you've discovered that the committee was 100% correct in not promoting this engineer. On the other hand, you've discovered that your corporation lacks a technical advancement track that will allow these people to feel as if their careers are progressing. Technical tracks are a strange beast because the bulk of developers hit senior ...


18

Without writing an entire spiel, it seems that he is doing the tasks that are required of him instead of going above and beyond. He is still doing the tasks from 9-5, as you have said. However, he is spending his time to do something else. Why would you expect him to continue to literally work for your company 24/7 when you have rejected him furthering his ...


14

First answer: Don't talk about lack of motivation. Talk about wasted work. You cannot produce anything useful without guidance. That means that you going without guidance is wasting the time and money of the company. That really is the core of your problem, and it's one that will resonate better than vague stuff about motivation. Second answer: It ...


12

Change the culture. I think he was trying to change the culture. Every other person on the team outputs poor quality code and no one in the entire company even knew it was happening. (Was no one even looking at the code ?) The fact that this was able to happen means something is wrong with the culture. It would never have happened in a culture that values ...


11

this time he insists on this pattern Then give him what he wants. He usually finds a solution satisfactory to everyone but this time is different for whatever reason. There must be a reasonable explanation on why your boss has done this. So complete the task the way he wants and do your job as it should be done. You're not always going to agree on things ...


11

You're asking how to maintain morale and productivity, but with that, you're skipping a step that you cannot really skip. And that step is, what is, realistically, the outlook and chances for the company in the short, intermediate and long run? As in, did the company actually fix their problems, or are the problems still there? Because, you can maintain ...


10

You can stop yawning through breathing in through your nose and out through the mouth. Breathing in through your nose cools blood vessels in your head that help stop you from yawning. Other advice would be to find techniques to feel more awake, such as getting out of bed without hitting snooze, drinking plenty water throughout the day, do exercise 3-4 ...


10

Do the work you are told, but make sure your plan of attack and its complete disregard is documented. When you are inevitably questioned for a dumb design later due to internal and external user rage you can use it to protect yourself since it was clearly not your idea. You can do this by getting your boss to explicitly state what he wants over what you ...


10

By you saying "no", you just slapped an "I'm Stupid" label smack in the middle of his forehead by conveying the message "your above and beyond efforts aren't what we're looking for" The short version of the solution: You need the developer to put trust/faith he lost back into the system/management again. Clarity on minimum expectations will also help, but ...


10

What He Wants +1 to @Patricia. Based on the information provided, my first guess is that he wants a new title. I would also assume that he wants a "Director" title because there are no more titles for individual contributors. Beyond "Senior", many companies have "Principal" and/or "Staff" engineering titles. Often, these are parallel in level to ...


9

Addressing this solely from the psychological stance asked for, I find there are a few things that help me get over a "bad choice" (in my opinion). The first is simply a little time - if I have to start coding the "wrong thing" immediately, my mind is replaying all of the arguments against this, not trying to see the best way to create it. Usually if I ...


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