95

In the interview, simply ask what their flexible working policy is and indicate that you've found remote working to be productive in the past. Then see what their policy/approach is and work from there. You'll probably find out here at what point you'll be allowed to work remotely (e.g. after the probation period has elapsed). You need not make a big deal ...


42

Startups offer equity because they acknowledge the risk to the employees of the company failing, so they present an 'upside' - if the company does well, everyone benefits. It takes a certain type of person to be attracted by that offer. Other people, like yourself, do the math; the company is unlikely to be that unicorn. What do you do? You reject their ...


30

In a similar vein to Snow's answer, you're free to ask about how flexible their work policies are. It will likely come up in an interview, depending on the questions they ask, and you can seamlessly talk about your successes in that remote work environment without having to awkwardly bring it up out of context. However, since you are relatively ...


25

Is unspent vacation time a good argument in pay negotiations? No. The company has already given you those days. The fact that you have not yet used them is irrelevant. From the company's standpoint, any value that those vacation days provide is already in your possession to either use or cash out if you leave the company. Your boss will surely be aware ...


24

You might consider negotiating your offer outside of the interview. Keep the interview to demonstrating your capabilities and asking questions that will help you decide if an opportunity with the company would be exciting. Instead of asking for remote work in an interview, express you desire for remote days to the recruiter. He or she can help you ...


14

I tend to add 'References available on request' at the end of my CV. That gives the notion that you will let them talk to somebody if the interview process goes far enough. I think though it also hints you would rather they didn't just go and contact anyone off their own back.


10

The first part of the answer to your question is that the portfolio risk working for a startup is nil -- you've paid nothing, you have nothing to lose. If your concern is that the downside risk to your portfolio will cause it to underperform, the question is "How?" Again, you paid nothing, and the only risk is not being compensated what you believe you are ...


8

This could backfire in many ways: It may signal that you may be a workaholic - someone who works so hard for so long that they get burned out. Companies allot time off because they know employees perform better when they use it. It may signal that you are not very good at managing your own schedule and resources. The "threat" of having to pay a handful of ...


7

I would not inform a recruiter of a possible offer, only an actual offer. If the contingent job offer turns into a real offer and you believe that the other organization(s) can provide an offer that you can seriously consider, then you can inform the recruiter of the other offer to see if they can expedite the process to get you an offer before the first ...


6

How to politely refuse a startup's equity? This is how I'd do it: No, I wouldn't be interested in that. But thanks anyway. There is really no need to go any further.


6

I would suggest two things: Clearly state your target salary at the start Know the current market salary so you don’t price yourself out of range. If your target is in the range of the market salary then this strategy should work. This somewhat assumes that your actual salary is lower than the market salary, but that seems to be the point...


4

Typically you get an offer of low salary + more or less generous equity because the company cannot afford to pay more. They know you are worth more, but they cannot pay the money. So you can obviously reject the equity, but you are not going to get a higher salary offer. You just have to do the maths: Is the salary x enough to live on: If no, you can't ...


4

The work from home agreement was made as a result of a medical condition? By getting rid of it, your employer risks breaching the Equality Act 2010. To quote the [UK Government’s official website] [1]: Reasonable adjustments in the workplace An employer has to make ‘reasonable adjustments’ to avoid you being put at a disadvantage compared to non-...


3

As for HR, I feel like they're on "his side" Human Resources exists to protect the company. They are never on your side unless a dispute arises between you and a third party. Even then it's still aimed at saving the company and not individual employees--we're saved as collateral un-damage. Don't get me wrong--there are plenty of wonderful bosses with big ...


3

When management changes, it is not unusual for the new boss to require the physical presence of all team members so they can start figuring out what they have from a resource perspective: talent wise, attitude, productivity, etc. Your first course of action, and most important one, is to work with your doctor and get to the bottom of your medical issues. ...


3

I've worked at two startup companies. My base salaries were reasonable, IMHO, and equity was a bonus on top of this. I worked for one of them for 7 years and then they declared bankruptcy and I was laid off -- the equity never materialized. The other was acquired and all our equity bonuses immediately vested, so I got a huge windfall. Related to Julie's ...


3

First Question: Do I ask for a raise for myself and my "integral employee"? When you feel underpaid, you should seek a raise. There is nothing wrong with informing your boss that you believe you're worth significantly more and are unhappy with how your paid. You can inform the owner that you will look elsewhere if you don't get an adequate raise as long as ...


3

If flexibility is important for you, you may want to consider picking job offers from companies which advertise flexible hours or remote work. It is now widely understood that flexible working conditions constitute an advantage, so companies which are able to offer such flexibility to you usually advertise it. Interviewing with the right companies from the ...


2

Highlight the pluses of you current situation and sell them as a reason to your low salary. Make clear to the recruiters that you accepted a lower salary because of the outstanding work/life balance (maybe borderline lie...), when they play the lowball card ask about work/life balance at the new workplace and ask that they put it in writing, then downplay ...


1

I've found that it's always best to do the ramp up in person, for all seniorities I've worked with. You being a junior means your ramp up will probably be a bit longer. If I were in the company, I'd prefer that you work on site all days at least for the first month, for this reason. I suggest you straight up offer this to the company, so they can see you're ...


1

In one of your comments you indicated that most of the recruiters are offering you a 20% raise and that this is something that they are very reluctant to deviate from. Ignoring internal promotions, this leaves you with four options: Accept a 20% pay rise and stick with the new company for a few years. Accept a 20% pay rise and aim to change jobs as swiftly ...


1

Negotiating a pay raise because a co-worker got one is never compelling from your employer's perspective. In this case, it sounds like your co-worker was paid similarly to you and got a raise because the company didn't want to lose him. This does not inherently make you underpaid. However, it is possible to negotiate a raise without getting a competing ...


1

All other issues aside, this would be a very foolish argument. Depending on your contract, when you leave, you may be able to get your days "cashed out" at your current rate. This means that if you have $30k of leave currently, and you get a 10% raise, that $30k becomes $33k. Which means immediately, the company's liability increases. So, basically you're ...


1

Usually resume sent with header "In Confidence" that implies that you don't want to them to contact your current employer.


1

They are many jobs out there that will allow you to work from home . The minimum is 1 day a week . Look for another one mate. This is obviously too much stress in you right now and your health comes first. Take some time off if you need to also. It's you then your company. Remember you work to live not live to work there is a big difference.


1

I would ignore the stock options unless the company emphasized their value in lieu of salary. I had an offer from a company once that was on the lower-end salary-wise but came with stock options. Their HR person kept emphasizing the stock options as if they were something that had real value. The way the options were set-up, you couldn't exercise them for ...


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