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130

I'm going to join the other answers that are frame-challenging your question. Instead of trying to find a way to win at negotiating an offer you don't intend to accept, you should just not negotiate for positions you don't intend to accept. If you don't intend to honestly consider taking a position, you should not pursue it. As an employer and a hiring ...


128

In the end, there are two numbers that count: What you want, and what they are willing to pay. I’m not very good at negotiating in the sense of talking someone into giving me more, which is why I just insist on my number: You: I want X. Them: We only have a budget for X-$10,000. You: I’m sure you can find the money, I want X. Them: That would set ...


46

You said, While I understand the need for big companies to have some kind of guideline, this makes any attempt for salary negotiation practically impossible That's not inherently true. What this approach seeks to do is streamline and objectify the negotiation process, not eliminate it. Many employees seem to think that this means their attempts at a ...


26

I think the simple answer is: Always ask for a salary where you would at least seriously consider taking the job if they are willing to give it to you. You can tell them directly that you are happy with your current job and would only consider switching if this comes with a serious salary increase. The information that someone would be willing to hire you ...


23

An NDA is a Non-Disclosure Agreement, which legally prohibits you from discussing anything that the company is doing during your employment. You may be required to sign this NDA before any employment contracts are issued. You should not expect to find any Employment Contract details, including any details of your post or Salary, inside the NDA - it's not ...


22

If it was me, I'd recommend a couple of things: Get a written commitment of the revised contract Get the pay increase backdated to the original date that it was agreed If I can't get these, I would personally be inclined to start applying for jobs outside again.


21

You've broken the cardinal rule. Never accept the counter-offer of your existing employer. What usually happens is that they'll offer you better terms, but often fire you a few months later on their own timetable. In your case, the COO seems to have taken it up a step further, your employer hasn't given you the promised raise, but still has managed to ...


18

Owner is determining raises based on customer work Well, they can determine whatever criteria they want for raise, does not matter. The real question is: do you think you are getting paid enough (including the raise), based on your work and contribution? Forget you've read about the criteria (which is a restricted or confidential information) Approach you ...


15

Is there a way to go around this? Not pragmatically at lower levels and best not to have that discussion, it just marks you as someone who may need to be replaced soon. The implication whenever trying to negotiate is that you may leave if your needs are not met. Certainly at the higher levels though, especially top levels, everything is up for negotiation ...


15

Your post is asking a few different questions, so I'll tackle each one separately: How to negotiate an offer if I'm not actually going to accept it? Don't negotiate any offer you're not wanting to accept. Be respectful of people's time and efforts. If an employer really wants you and is willing to go to higher management to negotiate a higher salary or ...


13

As someone who has done this successfully in the past, what worked for me was being honest from the get-go, both with the recruiter and with the company, and tell them about my current situation. Something like this is what I would pitch: Thanks for getting in touch with me. The project sounds very interesting, and I would definitely like to learn more ...


12

If you are adamant about working for this large company then you need to stop negotiating grade or salary and start negotiating your qualified position. Prove that you are not some average person and really highlight what you bring to the table and why you will excel in a better position. They clearly have an abundance of people at their disposal so losing ...


10

Welcome to Megacorp. We Excel at Average! There's some merit to their reasoning, but what such policies really ensure is that they average 44th percentile employees. The purpose is to protect against situations like rogue managers who give unreasonably high raises for less than stellar performance. The tradeoff is that they choose to not reward stellar ...


7

This year I accidentally read a memo addressed to HR that a lot of weight will be given to how "billable" an employee is. Would it be better to approach my boss before I'm told my raise, because he decides the amount beforehand. Or, when I likely get a small raise, should I argue my case at that time? In general, it's best to be proactive about ...


7

I would strongly recommend against doing this. I understand why. You're wanting some leverage against your current employer to negotiate a raise. But I'll raise some concerns with your approach. If your skills, experience and work performance are high then those things should be sufficient to negotiate a pay increase. Would your current employer ...


7

As is already mentioned. Just ask. Make sure they understand that it is not a secret way of getting even more money. You are just thinking about the title. It could be though that it is coupled to you salary. Many companies job titles (although this is probably cultural) are coupled to certain salary scales. So that could be a reason for them not to agree. ...


7

Should I wait passively until they come back to me and tell me their offer? Yes This has for me the disadvantage that I see some risk they will come back and say they cannot come close to my offer so they won't hire me. That is the risk. Should I proactively contact them and tell them I am cool with a salary right in the middle of their offer ...


5

Is it reasonable It's just a job title. The company can give any title they want. I once worked in a place where every single person in the engineering department was a senior engineer, including the guy who drove us to sites and 2 guys with no qualifications at all. I'd like the title of Senior Software Engineer for my resume, future job prospects, and ...


5

Talk with your manager now, there's little to gain by waiting, but there is a lot to lose by not giving as much notice as you can. Some things you should consider: Give as much notice as possible. Give your manager a chance to keep critical work that you're working on going after you leave. If the organization knows you're leaving, other colleagues can ...


4

From my experience, they only ease off whenever you decide to move on. Of course, in your area things might be different, I know that here in Canada, IT resources are very rare and they tend to play that game a little bit (we can't offer you more than X) but they really NEED you. Remember that it is a negotiation process and they do it on a daily basis. ...


4

Of course you may negotiate your job title. Generally, it costs your future employer nothing to give you a title that reflects your level of responsibility. You certainly should ask. If you'll deal with customers or the public, or submit papers to journals, a "higher" title can help your credibility. That's why banks have so many vice presidents. Be ...


4

I think really you need to talk to a lawyer. As far as negotiation goes, they have demonstrated willingness to completely screw you over, and even the law won't stop them. There is nothing that should make you think that anything you can do short of legal action can make them change that.


2

I fully agre with Sourav question. Your explanation misses one big thing. "Offer valid until void". You will learn nothing more that what you already can with tools that are avaiable (I think even LinkedId had a feature where it told how much, on average, a person in such and such position could earn in such and such area). You will not only waste your time ...


1

Since you know the situation accidentally, I think you should approach it more elegantly. I would suggest to give you boss signals, ask him or her out for a talk and address your concerns, but from a third person's perspective. Hope this helps.


1

IMHO, you should look up for number 1 - you. I wouldn't trust your current employer to uphold the deal, given they reneged several times on verbal agreements. As for going internal at the client - you need to check local labor laws and your current contract, but to me it seems as best possible resolution. Good luck and please keep us posted


1

What is the notice period for your internship? If there is a mutual understanding that you would convert to full time at the end of your internship, then that notice period length is the smallest amount of time you can give your manager while remaining professional. When you give your notice, be sure to tell them about the research group that you're ...


1

If you have friends or upperclassmen from school who work in a similar field in a similar location, you can ask them for advice on what they are being paid. Based on that, you can go to the company and say something like "after talking to some friends of mine in a similar industry with similar experience, I feel like I should be asking [this much]", and ...


1

There are websites that provide such statistics, including StackOverflow jobs or Glassdoor. Googling something like "[job title] [location] salary" can be helpful as well. That being said, only you know how much you are worth. You should explore some of the salary negotiation questions on this website to get a feeling of the standard of professional ...


1

According to the information provided, the titles are not linked to your position in the hierarchy, but to years of experience and technical expertise. There are also no department / reporting lines, since you report stright to the CEO. This means that there is no organizational reason for having a ratio of junior x senior developers. There might be a ...


1

I am making some assumptions here, but make an appointment with your manager, as already stated in the comments, and prepare well for it. If I understand you correctly, it should be fairly easy to generate some numbers that will show that there's not much work in the project. Be it numbers of ticket, hours worked on tasks or else (I don't know your industry)...


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