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110

My question is how I can convey that I'll be actively pursuing external opportunities if I don't get this promotion without it sounding like a threat. You can't, because it is a threat. In reality, you gain nothing by announcing that you will be actively pursuing external opportunities. In fact, you are more likely to hurt yourself by doing so. If you ...


79

I talked freely about how I don't like my work environment - small, isolated team. I also talked quite openly about wanting to work with more up-to-date technologies. But in retrospect even these reasons can discourage people from hiring me if they think they can't provide exactly what I'm asking for. Short answer: NEVER DO THAT!! Longer answer: in an ...


56

A job interview is a two way street. The employer gets to evaluate your skills and determine if you are fit for the position, and you get to evaluate the employer and decide if they would provide a satisfying job for you. On the surface, this is easy to understand - employers will ask questions about skills, and employees typically focus on easy to ...


27

There is no value to be had for you to tell them that you will leave if you are not promoted. It just sounds like you are trying to determine how important you are to the organization. If they are not doing a good job keeping good people, they likely are not concerned with individuals in general. If they aren't attempting to keep the people you trust, you ...


25

Given the way your issue has been handled by each company, I'd be revisiting the decision to leave. A supportive company is often worth more than a couple of dollars in the paycheck.


18

My question is how I can convey that I'll be actively pursuing external opportunities if I don't get this promotion without it sounding like a threat. You don't need to convey anything about leaving at this point. Follow the sequence below: Ask for what you believe you're worth of (promotion, salary revision etc.). Start finding other opportunities when ...


16

Accepted a job in a new city, but then badly injured my leg. My doctor told me not to move now. What does professionalism require? Professionalism requires that you follow your doctor's directions. Give your new employer the worst possible April estimate (or a May estimate in case it takes you a couple of weeks to move cities once you're able to). ...


15

The offers are risk adjusted Let's make a simplifying assumption and posit that both jobs are roughly equal, on aggregate, in all aspects. That being true, in a perfect world, their offers should be the same. But, you don't have perfect information on both - only on your current job. That means your offer P for the new job incorporates a degree of risk ...


13

The rule of thumb is: Do not say the negative words, rather express your willingness to work for an organization which has the positive sides you're looking for. Example: Don't say I was not promoted in existing company, say "I am looking for an opportunity where I am assigned with more challenging work and scope to utilize my skill set to exhibit the ...


13

how I can convey that I'll be actively pursuing external opportunities if I don't get this promotion without it sounding like a threat? By describing your goals, not your tactics. You'll likely be asked why you're going for the more senior position. Answer something like: I've been in {current role} for 2.5 years now. I've learned a lot, and I feel ...


13

How do I negotiate compensation for a job I don't know if I deserve? I have no degree yet, so I feel ridiculously blessed to have this opportunity. This is completely normal. It's called the impostor syndrome. Will he want to pay me per project? Yes, he will want that. They all want that. That's like being paid $2 an hour, because of course, ...


9

Any suggestions on how to convince management? If you're not happy with the increment you received, you need to ensure your disagreement is communicated properly. You did the correct thing to arrange a meeting with the HR, you may also like to invite your superior in that meeting and present the following points: The contributions you made The value ...


9

Is it appropriate to request a salary raise after trial/probation period is complete? IMO asking for a raise after only 6 month, regardless of performance, could be seen as a little greedy, since you already had your 'Lohnverhandlung' (salary-discussion) during the hiring process just a couple of months ago. You and the company agreed on the terms and the ...


7

Typically there are a few aspects which limit a possible (unexpected) raise: A) there must be department budget for it (which might be especially challenging if the fiscal year is already planned) B) the new salary must fit within the internal regulation brackets for the position. C) the new salary must be comparable with other existing colleagues. ...


7

If you are working in Germany, and at the same company for ten years, then German law puts facts ahead of contracts. In this case, the FACT that you worked there for ten years would override the CONTRACT that says your employment is for say one year only. You cannot use contracts to change facts in Germany. In practice this means that your notice period and ...


6

When seeking a job, focus on the positive aspects of both your current and future roles. Avoid discussing criticism of your current employer or your role. Use statements like: "I'm seeking opportunities to learn about and contribute to new technologies like ____ and ____." "I enjoy working in cross-functional and integrated teams, and am seeking roles that ...


6

Surprisingly, the bigger a company is, the stricter are rules and policies in general. So, despite $1B+ yearly profit, each department can be obliged to stay within very narrow budgets, staff grades, salary levels etc. So, your current management could be in position offering the best they can give you, and any bigger digit cannot be authorized by their ...


6

You are suggesting 10-15% after 6 months, there I would say in general no, not appropriate. In the first few months at a new company you still need to learn how everything works, what the projects are, familiarize yourself with everything. That means you are creating little to no value for the company. That's normal and expected, so no reason to worry about ...


5

Graduating from University isn't likely to be a reason to increase your pay. After all, the company likely hired you on, knowing that you would continue to work for them after you graduated. What you should focus on is your skills and completed tasks. The certification is certainly a big deal because that's time, money and effort you and the company sank to ...


4

It's professional and reasonable to tell a company that you are interviewing with that you have already received an offer from someone else and are considering it. if they say, "Oh, well nevermind," then they weren't all that interested in you, and that's fine. But there's a decent chance that they'll say, "Huh... well, that company usually knows their stuff....


4

For how long could I delay signing an offered job contract and how to best justify it? As long as you are comfortable with it. Normally all employers know that the potential employees apply for multiple positions at once. So, no need to clarify this. If asked, you can say you are waiting for feedback from another companies. It's normal. But here I have to ...


4

I really don't want to change jobs as this one is quite close to my home Does the company know that you don't want to change jobs? If yes, then there is not much you can expect in terms of positive outcomes. Your better ratings were already hushed under the carpet. Negotiations require that you have something that the other party very much desires, and that ...


4

I think it's always best to talk about what excites you in the potential new role over what you disliked about your own role. Try to tailor your responses to the interview (it's okay to stretch the truth a bit for it-- they're absolutely stretching the truth when they tell you certain elements as well). Rather than saying "I hate working with freakin' java ...


4

Mention only those issues which, if found, will surely make you leave this new job too. I'm doing some technical interviews for my employer. I don't really believe that the goal of asking a question about the motivation behind leaving a job is merely to see if the candidate is prone to badmouthing their employer. Whenever I ask a candidate: "What was it you ...


4

We work to live, not the other way around. People have priorities, and they change (over time). If your changed life priorities warrants that you need to have the work arrangement changed, so be it. You are very right, never go into the mode where you want to "threaten" the employer, as I read so far your work experience has been good. You get into a ...


3

My first thought is, How badly do you need the job? If you are unemployed and the bill collectors are closing in, then presumably you don't want to say anything that will lead a potential employer to think you are not suited to this job. But if that's not the case, if you are have a job that is at least tolerable and you are looking for a job that you will ...


3

Companies aren't interested in talent. They are interested in profit. Talent is just a tool towards attaining profit. While it is typical for companies to tell their employees that they are their greatest assets and that they have the greatest around, they have no reason to want the greatest. They want the necessary talent for the price. They want to ...


2

Can you clarify: You got a very good performance rating (9.5 out of 10) and that rating was changed by upper management? By someone who has no clue what your performance is? In that case that's quite despicable and dishonest. It is Ok (not nice for you but Ok) if upper management says "your performance was excellent, but we don't have the money or we don't ...


2

I simply want to know if it is appropriate to do so or not? It is only appropriate, if it can be justified. If you believe you're worth of getting paid more, prepare a case and present it to your boss and ask for a raise. Two things to keep in mind: Don't expect a raise because you feel like getting a raise. Don't be shy to ask for a raise if you feel ...


2

Whether you take the job or not makes a huge difference to the recruitement agency. They get paid, or they get not paid. The payment may be dependent on the salary, but that is a very minor amount to them. So the motivation of the recruitement agency is to do anything to make the company offer you the job and to make you accept the job. So if the ...


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