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How do I take advantage of a much better offer in monetary terms if I don't actually want to change companies?

As one of the famous quotes say: "Nothing someone says before the word 'but' really counts." You said: "I am reluctant to give up my network and current circumstances, but I don't ...
Sourav Ghosh's user avatar
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4 votes

How do I take advantage of a much better offer in monetary terms if I don't actually want to change companies?

However, this demand is far below the new offer. Maybe, maybe not. Some recruiters are good about this thing but others just blow hot air without any data or justification. I wouldn't take any ...
Hilmar's user avatar
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1 vote

How do I take advantage of a much better offer in monetary terms if I don't actually want to change companies?

Recruiters cannot be relied upon in general, and it's very likely that you could delay accepting any new offer of employment until after your internal appointment has occurred, so no conflict may ...
Steve's user avatar
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1 vote

How do I take advantage of a much better offer in monetary terms if I don't actually want to change companies?

I think you need to choose what is more valuable for you: the salary or the network and circumstances, as apparently you cannot get both at the same time. You can play the card of giving notice and ...
L.Dutch's user avatar
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2 votes

My company computer was damaged and lost during a typhoon

In general, a contractor is supposed to provide their own tools to do the job, an employee is supposed to use the tools the employer provides. While "work from home" changes that situation ...
nvoigt's user avatar
  • 138k
-1 votes

My company computer was damaged and lost during a typhoon

It depends on what country you are in and what the agreement was. When we allowed our staff to take their work computers home, during Covid, we discovered that our insurance company would not cover ...
Rohit Gupta's user avatar
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0 votes

Agreement made at hire is unenforceable due to a technicality, employer refuses to make new agreement to correct

I was in a situation similar to yours which backfired to a degree, and then in one or two other ones where the same approach worked well. I am similar to you in the tendency to actually read all the ...
Jirka Hanika's user avatar
11 votes

Agreement made at hire is unenforceable due to a technicality, employer refuses to make new agreement to correct

I'd argue you are covered either way One of these two scenarios are true: The company president has authority to sign contracts. You're fine, and the letter stands. The company president does not ...
lupe's user avatar
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1 vote

Agreement made at hire is unenforceable due to a technicality, employer refuses to make new agreement to correct

Ah, another typical engineer thought process. (It's okay, I'm an engineer). In the handbook, cross out the word "CEO" and write "executive" or "president", and initial ...
Xavier J's user avatar
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0 votes

Agreement made at hire is unenforceable due to a technicality, employer refuses to make new agreement to correct

You are right that you don't want to sign a newer document that includes language that you are disagreeing with. Don't think that older documents will outweigh newer documents. In fact, the ...
TOOGAM's user avatar
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