New answers tagged

2

TL;DR: Your boss isn't justified, but it's (most likely) not a negotiation, so just make sure you handle this situation carefully and strategically to avoid costly mistakes. Your boss is in the wrong, but tread carefully I think your boss is totally in the wrong. That said, make sure you handle this situation carefully. If you leave, you want to do so on ...


37

The new manager says, 'attending this conference is "a condition of your employment here"'. The old manager already decided it wasn't essential that you be available that week, and you have that in writing in the form of the original approval for the leave. You have a bus factor of 1 on your job and you're willing to quit. The new manager hasn't (as far as ...


11

Whether or not there is a legal basis (e.g. employment contract) for them revoking your leave, you may be covered under Promissory Estoppel. This is not legal advice, I am not a lawyer. The elements of Promissory Estoppel are: Some form of legal relationship either exists or is anticipated between the parties You are their employee, so a legal ...


246

First of all, if in your first interaction with your new manager, that manager threatens to fire you for not cancelling an already approved PTO just to attend a conference, you clearly need to establish that you won't put up with that behavior. Any kind of negotiation that lets your manager get away with this would just mean more of the same in the future. ...


255

She's just a manager. She's not the company owner. There is HR, and there is your previous manager who is in a higher position than she is. So unless your previous manager always wanted to get rid of you and left the dirty deed to her, you are reasonably safe. "Attending the conference is a condition of your employment here" is extremely confrontational, ...


48

I would talk to your old manager and get him to find out if she is serious. Is she just trying to show off her authority? If so, then that is an easy way to lose a developer with what looks like serious consequences. If they have not been able to find a suitable second yet, then if she causes you to move on, she would be signing her own leaving certificate.....


0

This change means that exactly half of your salary is paid two weeks later than before. The company can argue that they just did you a favour paying every two weeks and they stop doing you the favour. Let's assume they admit that this change is at your expense. The interest for half of your salary paid with two weeks delay would be the same as the annual ...


1

No, it’s not reasonable. How you choose to invest, or whether you do at all, is none of your employer’s business once you get your paycheck. Many employers encourage employees to invest in their 401K, but that’s usually a bit of self-interest. And it’s not mandatory. For all they know, you could cash your check every week. Plus the fact that you say you’...


2

I have had two companies change the frequency of pay, both had issues making the switch, so several things need to be addressed. Case 1 A company went from getting paid on the last day of the pay period to a week after the end of the pay period. This change did simplify things for everybody. In the old method corrected time cards had to be submitted if you ...


1

The company perspective Going from paying twice a month to paying once a month could really deliver significant savings. Many banks levy a flat fee on any commercial transactions. By doing payments once per month they halve the fees they're paying. It also saves a significant of administrative work for your company, and therefore saves money. Given that ...


0

collective 1% raise to cover this loss This and only this is the reason for asking for a raise. And it need to be backed up by proof. For example people having biweekly bills and somehow not having an income with certain amount means extra charges or something. Or that changing payment cycle means being paid AFTER the bills come. From logicl point of view ...


1

I'd advise you to brush up your resume and start looking for a new job. This is a money saving move, but at the cost to the average worker. Companies that care about their employees go the other way and pay more frequently, rather than less. To me it screams of desperation and total lack of regard for the employees. As far as a cost to you, 1% is ...


12

I'm not sure how to calculate it exactly, but I also know that I'll be losing some small amount of money from this change, as my bank pays 1.8% interest compounded daily (I wanted to make sure I answered this part of your question, since "Is it reasonable to ask" is just based on opinions, and might result in the question being closed. Hopefully this ...


10

The difference in interest between paying bi-weekly and monthly is miniscule, assuming even higher band salaries (60k+) you are looking at, at most, tens of dollars over the year, while the supposed 1% raise would go into 600. Hardly a fair trade-off. The employees who may struggle with the switch likely can figure it out together with HR/Accounting for a ...


-2

More than reasonable. You should probably ask for 2% This change could easily force people to use their credit cards or lines of credit substantially. Depending on when bills are due with the credit card companies and when they receive their pay, it could easily cost 2% in interest if they need to carry the balance for a bit. 2% is what it will cost some ...


2

We all need to negotiate now and then in our life, and not all of us (probably, most of us) don't do well when put on the spot. Some preparation strategies that may help: Prepare for questions Try to anticipate what the other party will say or ask, and what your answer should be. Decide beforehand what you want, and what would be minimally acceptable What ...


22

This is business. Your self-worth is not at stake. You are being asked to invest your only irreplaceable resource, your time, in this company. By trading cash salary for shares / ESOP / options / RSUs / whatever, you become an investor in the company. This is fairly common at early-stage companies. Therefore: part of your decision-making process should be ...


2

You should be careful with email when negotiating anything contractual. An email can be just as binding as a signed contract. Sending a "thank you" note expressing your appreciation for the counterparty's time and consideration is certainly appropriate, but be careful not to include any details of what was negotiated. As an aside, here are a few things to ...


2

If you are only interested in cyber security jobs, and this is not one, simply call the person of contact, explain your position, and cancel the interview if necessary. If you found an open, entry-level cyber security position on their website, ask if you can instead interview for that position. If you haven't found such a position on their website, ask ...


3

You should get in touch with your point in contact and explain that you think you'd be a better fit for their other role, which is advertised, and you wonder if it's still available. They will let you know whether it's still available or not and if you can actually interview for that position. Make sure you clearly mention the following: Why you prefer the ...


7

I fully agree with the answer given by Kilisi. However, I'd like to extend that by adding another point of view. Once my coworker departs (after the notice period), I would like to negotiate a raise. This will also coincide with my year-end review in mid-December. You have an added advantage, as the natural performance review cycle is around the corner. ...


3

With that in mind, how can I leverage my coworker's departure into a raise? By outlining your increased responsibilities. Basically you don't have to do much except give the amount you feel you need to stay working there plus a bit extra so you have room if needed. The less rationalisation you need to do at that point the better. But have your arguments ...


3

My question is, how unprofessional is it to reject the offer at this point, provided I find a better opportunity soon (Dec 3rd at latest)? I don't mind burning bridges with the contracting company, but I'd like to keep my options open with the hiring company. Either reject the offer right now, or passively accept the offer by saying nothing. Waiting ...


8

I would call the hiring company immediately and tell them what the situation is. You haven't accepted the position. You haven't seen the contract. The recruiting company cannot accept a job offer on your behalf. You would prefer to make a decision once other interviews are done, and you would need to see the contract and sign it yourself. If that is a ...


0

I should also mention that I will be at the same [defense] company, it would be with a new contractor who does not know how much I was making before. You can ask for more, stipulating that it is contingent on the benefits they offer (showing that you're open to negotiations). I worked for a US contractor a while ago that had the award for a [non-...


13

Just wanted to add that there's nothing to be embarrassed of. Every step you took made sense w.r.t the information you had at the time you took it. Each time you switch jobs there is a risk that it will be a change for the worse. The real error many people make is sticking to the new job no matter what because they are unable to admit they have made the ...


2

it would be with a new contractor who does not know how much I was making before. Regarding salary, is it okay for me to ask for more money since they are offering me my old position back, or should I only ask for what I was making before? Should I just take what I can get? The customers knows how much they were paying for your services. That ...


73

Should I just take what I can get? Yes. Your goal here is to get out of a failing company and back to somewhere you enjoy working. Failing to do that isn't worth a little bit of extra cash this year. You're no more valuable now than you were when you left, so you've got no reason why they should pay you more. Big defence contractors tend to have rigid, ...


113

FWIW, I knew someone a few years ago that was in a similar situation, and he actually had to take a salary hit when he returned to his old place of work. You're certainly not in a strong position to negotiate a higher salary here: You've made it clear that you want your old job back - you've reached out to them and asked (they're not begging you to come ...


3

You wouldn't like it if said company kept surprising you with new contract terms every time you've agreed on something. Especially in this stage of your relationship, it's best to be transparent and open about your requests. There's also an added benefit to this transparancy; if the company is unable to meet one of your requests, let's say there's a ...


9

Is it okay to negotiate salary and remote work at the same time? TL;DR: Is is OK and it is expected. Think about this: in the job offer, if the organization mentioned only one responsibility and after accepting the offer, they tell you about another responsibility, and after joining, they tell you about several more - how would you feel? Put all terms and ...


4

Negotiate for everything you want at the start. It's best to lay your cards on the table so everyone knows what is happening, no surprises further down the line. That just makes you look like you didn't think things through seriously, which is unprofessional.


8

I felt injustice after my company hired fresh graduates with higher salary and grade than mine You should change your point of view: think this way - Are you getting paid enough for the value addition you provide to the organization? If you think you deserved to be paid more (based on your work and performance), go ahead and ask for it. If the organization ...


0

This is a "lesson" for you. Next time you have to ask more questions and politely insist on writing all agreements on "paper" before moving on. You may think that this will be considered strange by your boss or HR. Maybe, but at least you'll be safe. When it comes to money, don't joke with it. Just like you said, the salary weighting is very unclear. I ...


3

Given the fact that the paycheck revision (weighting, as you said) was agreed upon, but no fixed (or minimum) amount was promised, the organization is free to choose the amount thy are willing to offer. You are also free to either accept the revision and continue, or find a new job where your expectations are met. You need to take your call: Whether to ...


3

Is it regular not mentioning the paid per hour in the contract? An NDA (Non-Disclosure Agreement) is not an employment contract. The NDA doesn't include salary information. Should I ask for a modification to my contract? The employment contract (or offer letter) itself should include salary information. If it doesn't, you should ask for it to be ...


15

As someone who has done this successfully in the past, what worked for me was being honest from the get-go, both with the recruiter and with the company, and tell them about my current situation. Something like this is what I would pitch: Thanks for getting in touch with me. The project sounds very interesting, and I would definitely like to learn more ...


3

Simply negotiate the offer as if you are going to accept it. But all of this is pointless If you do this enough you'll soon find yourself blacklisted by the local recruiters and jobs around your surrounding area so when you do need to begin a job hunt, you'll be looking at positions further a field where the salaries could be drastically different to match ...


34

An NDA is a Non-Disclosure Agreement, which legally prohibits you from discussing anything that the company is doing during your employment. You may be required to sign this NDA before any employment contracts are issued. You should not expect to find any Employment Contract details, including any details of your post or Salary, inside the NDA - it's not ...


23

Owner is determining raises based on customer work Well, they can determine whatever criteria they want for raise, does not matter. The real question is: do you think you are getting paid enough (including the raise), based on your work and contribution? Forget you've read about the criteria (which is a restricted or confidential information) Approach you ...


8

This year I accidentally read a memo addressed to HR that a lot of weight will be given to how "billable" an employee is. Would it be better to approach my boss before I'm told my raise, because he decides the amount beforehand. Or, when I likely get a small raise, should I argue my case at that time? In general, it's best to be proactive about ...


1

Since you know the situation accidentally, I think you should approach it more elegantly. I would suggest to give you boss signals, ask him or her out for a talk and address your concerns, but from a third person's perspective. Hope this helps.


8

I would strongly recommend against doing this. I understand why. You're wanting some leverage against your current employer to negotiate a raise. But I'll raise some concerns with your approach. If your skills, experience and work performance are high then those things should be sufficient to negotiate a pay increase. Would your current employer ...


134

I'm going to join the other answers that are frame-challenging your question. Instead of trying to find a way to win at negotiating an offer you don't intend to accept, you should just not negotiate for positions you don't intend to accept. If you don't intend to honestly consider taking a position, you should not pursue it. As an employer and a hiring ...


28

I think the simple answer is: Always ask for a salary where you would at least seriously consider taking the job if they are willing to give it to you. You can tell them directly that you are happy with your current job and would only consider switching if this comes with a serious salary increase. The information that someone would be willing to hire you ...


3

I fully agre with Sourav question. Your explanation misses one big thing. "Offer valid until void". You will learn nothing more that what you already can with tools that are avaiable (I think even LinkedId had a feature where it told how much, on average, a person in such and such position could earn in such and such area). You will not only waste your time ...


16

Your post is asking a few different questions, so I'll tackle each one separately: How to negotiate an offer if I'm not actually going to accept it? Don't negotiate any offer you're not wanting to accept. Be respectful of people's time and efforts. If an employer really wants you and is willing to go to higher management to negotiate a higher salary or ...


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