New answers tagged

0

If you're willing to risk the company retracting the offer and going with another candidate instead because they're unwilling to negotiate (or rather give in to your demands), go ahead. If you consider the offer a reasonable one and you're unwilling to take that risk (and it's a very real risk), accept the offer and work hard to gain a raise or promotion. ...


1

Whether one should always counter or push back may primarily depend on the business segment. I could imagine some lines of business where not countering is seen as weakness. If this is the case, one is probably best advised to follow the culture. In general though, the relationship-building between employer and employee starts during - and especially after -...


17

I was encouraged by some people that I should always counter any offers with a higher one. In this case, would it be advisable to counter an job offer from a company? Only do so if you are not satisfied with the offer given. You say in comments that you are satisfied with it, given the position and your experience, and that it is on or above average, so I ...


0

Perhaps talk to your previous manager. That will be a head's up for trouble in the organisation. Also it'll give you a contact elsewhere which are always useful. For example if ex-manager knows you're not happy with the responsibility dumped on you and hears of a suitable opportunity then you might just get a phone call... The following is guesswork: ...


0

By what they say, i.e. there is an annual review to adjust for market rate, the overall comparison doesn't make sense. If at the end of the year you would get a larger increase than now, that increase still should happen or the annual reviewers aren't doing their job right. If you would get a larger increase as adjustment from your current position at the ...


8

I'm assuming that you now have increased responsibilities due to your manager's departure, and they aren't actively recruiting to fill your former manager's vacant position. If, on the other hand, you are still doing the same job as before, then they would be justified in giving you neither a title change nor a salary increase. I think you are being ...


34

From personal experience, "Pay Raise Later" never materializes. Telling you now that they'll pay you more later is easy... and every time I've had a company tell me that, it fell through for one reason or another. There is always a reason to not pay you more. Fundamentally, unless you know for a fact that the person who is in charge of deciding your pay ...


24

This will apparently be heavily scrutinized due to the time of year and the fact it would interfere with the current budget Budgets are always scrutinized, but to play Devil's Advocate, I'd argue that your manager's departure has freed up plenty of planned expenses that could defray the cost of increasing your salary. The two options you outlined are both ...


1

Is it reasonable for me to ask for a rate that's 20-30% higher than their target? That's a perfectly reasonable request. The total cost to them is only the equivalent of an extra month or two on the contract. However, based on your numbers, to market rate for a contract would be about 150% higher (assuming contacts pay double permanent jobs). It's just ...


1

Is this worth pursuing or are we too far apart? You are in a powerful position, they think you're qualified for the job, and you don't need this job badly enough to work for the rate they quoted. Given that you are already comfortable with walking away, you have nothing to lose whatsoever by pursuing this. Make them the offer you'd like to receive (not ...


1

Full Disclosure: I grew up around Shopping. My father spent most of his career as a Shopper (contract engineer). My first real gig, while still in school, was a contract job. My first gig after graduation was a short-term contract job. If the Direct salary you quoted is even remotely close to the going rate, then their proposed contract rate is ...


1

You asked, Is this worth pursuing or are we too far apart? None of us can really answer that, because we don't know how they will respond. Of course, you can always give them a number. And the good news is, in this case, they have asked you for your number! Some may advise that you give them a number even higher than your target, so you have some "wiggle ...


40

Accepting a title change without a corresponding pay bump puts you at a serious disadvantage. There's nothing stopping the company from saying "Congratulations on your promotion, we've given you the maximum allowable 5% increase!" or even "We don't feel you're fully up to speed on the additional responsibilities of your new role, so we're not offering you a ...


173

Never let talk of budget considerations stand in the way of getting ahead. Without you they have no team and they're currently not having to pay a manager who I assume was making more than you. The thing about leverage is that it's often temporary: you use it or you lose it. If your responsibilities and tasks will increase, your pay should at the same time,...


16

why can't they provide me with a position in [team A]? Maybe they don't have any (relevant) open positions right now. just let me skip the 2 interviews for the position at division B Consider this from the other side - would you ever want somebody coming into your team who you hadn't interviewed? If somebody tried to do that to my team, my boss would ...


3

Ask For Raise / Promotion Before Leaving? You can and should ask for a raise if you feel that the value that you currently are providing to the company is worth more than what you are currently paid. The promotion, if you intend to leave, you should not ask for. When you ask for a promotion, you are asking for more responsibilities within the company and ...


2

Would this potentially leave a sour taste in the mouth of previous employer? Most probably yes, plus if (for example) you go up a rank and your next employer asks how long you held that position they might not look favourably on you leaving after a very short period of time. Maybe you couldn't cut it? Maybe you were asked to go. IMHO that would be a ...


2

Usually people have a job offer in hand and they go up to their boss and say, Hey look, I need a raise to X amount. The boss will say something like, Hey look, we can't give you that. You can try other places but I don't think you will do better. Then you say, Hey look, I actually did. I turn in my two weeks, see you later. Then the boss will say,...


4

If you attempt to manipulate a current employer with an outstanding offer (your old offer isn't an outstanding offer), you can find yourself unemployed. It isn't uncommon to terminate an employee who tries using an offer to get a raise. For one thing, quite often an employee who's dissatisfied enough to go all the way through the interview process that they ...


18

I ended up turning the offer down a few months ago. You are late for negotiations, and don't have anything to walk away to. more than 3x what I currently make That could be due to higher cost of living etc in the new city/country, so fix upon some expected salary first. Is 2x good enough? 30%? anything over x? Is it available in your current location ...


8

Here's my suggestion: Don't try to take advantage of the current situation to negotiate a salary increase. Any action on your part is going to be seen for what it is, an attempt to take advantage of what sounds like an already bad situation. That won't bode well for you in your negotiations. Take your new found knowledge, research the local job market for ...


6

In an ideal world, salary would be a negotiated compensation for the value you provide the employer. It's hard to make arguments based on peers, because individual skill levels and performance can vary. Of course, if you're making 60% less than people who you're obviously outperforming, that's an issue. But in many employers, there may be legitimate ...


-2

If climbing a corporate ladder or title collecting is your goal then keep up the good work. honestly it sounds like you just want some more money and a decent work-life balance which is what most people want. Studies show that any amount of money beyond $70,000 per year does not add significant value or happiness to your life. I'm a firm believer in working ...


1

I would say short of trying what other people have suggested here if you have communicated and your management still feels everything is fine then you should have no reason to get all excited either. You come in and leave on a normal day schedule. Work will be there tomorrow. However if they are sweating bullets and still expect you to pick up the load ...


2

[Copied from a comment on request] The other possibility is to find out if the company has a fast-track promotion process. I've worked with a handful of exceptionally talented people who were very obviously on a ballistic career trajectory. Sometimes companies can retain such people, and some times those "promotions take time" policies cost them an employee....


1

I think a lot of answers here will tell you to play hardball. And while it is helpful to make yourself clear what you can and what you are willing to do, drawing a line in the sand in a confrontational meeting shouldn't be your first move to change your situation. I'd rather start with a smaller meeting with your direct manager. Prepare a list of everything ...


2

TL;DR: Your company seems to be in full panic mode right now, and at least part of the responsible management is absent. Make it crystal clear to whoever is in charge that you have an impossible list of tasks right now and need some priorities to work on; also make it clear that it is not possible (for you alone, at least) to solve everything at once, so ...


1

Reduced hours and responsibilities is one approach, but it might look strange if you already feel like you're under suspicion for your previous association. You could also approach this by call a meeting of the various stakeholders - your current boss, perhaps you can include the guy in Germany via conference-call, etc. Then in the meeting, make it clear ...


1

The problem here is that you've been doing a huge amount of unpaid work in the expectation that the company will reward you with a promotion and more pay. This was never in a contract or even a verbal promise, just your assumption. Your boss will have some flexibility but he will also be bound by company rules and his boss. You may (as Hilmar suggests) be ...


0

Depending upon the position, I see jobs advertised every day supposedly paying as low as a third of what I would expect to be paid. With or without the boilerplate "depending upon experience". Further, I would always expect such positions to pay close to what I have previously been offered. Some wriggle room is expected. If it is not worth your while they ...


6

Don't be roundabout or dishonest: It's time to have an open and honest discussion with your manger. Tell him what you told us: Your achievements, your massive overtime and the scope of your work, that you feel is at the principle level and that you are underpaid for what you are delivering Tell him, that you understand that a promotion at this time is out ...


4

TLDR: It seems to me your immediate motivation is better pay for doing all of this. If that is so, negotiate on this aspect for now, rather than an immediate promotion, or taking the approach of lighting fires. highest-seniority engineer ("Senior Engineer IV") in Canada for a large US-based engineering firm Manager noted that nobody gets promoted ...


3

There is absolutely nothing wrong with being honest. If you have reliable information on what they are prepared to pay for a role, then use it if you want to. Weigh up the people and all the pro's and cons but don't desist because you're scared. Negotiations are an important part of a career, there are no hard and fast rules. My strategy would be to ask ...


6

is it worth resorting to using the information about the offer given to the previous candidate during my salary negotiation? No. Firstly, the offer may be considered confidential and disclosing your knowledge may get someone (including you) in trouble for mishandling confidential company information. Secondly, comparative negotiations are almost always ...


2

Bit of a hard answer here: Don't feel you're underpaid: know you're underpaid. If someone came up to me and said, "I feel I'm underpaid and I could probably get a better paying job elsewhere," I'm going to mentally think, 'Everyone thinks they're underpaid, and the fact you said "probably" means you don't actually know one way or another.' Because while ...


0

Salary is up to negotiation. There is a minority that sees this as unethical due to the potential for abuse, but it is accepted by a vast majority as ethical because there are no clearly superior options. Letting you see the higher default salary, and therefore informing you that your poor negotiation skills cost you a lot of money isn't unethical, it's ...


2

What would be a professional "in-between" response Your motivation here seems to be to thank the recruiter out of gratitude for having got your salary bumped. If so, you have 2 options: Reply I accept the offer on the initial mail (which may have other people in thread). Then, send another individual mail to the recruiter / call them to thank them for ...


-2

Assuming from your name that you are a woman, you might want to think about possible gender discrimination issues. They can be very hard to prove, but it seems that there may be some evidence that you saw. You could talk to your boss or HR, telling them that you feel like you are being paid less than other people doing the same job and are concerned that ...


9

Simply saying "I accept the offer" without thanking them seems a bit insensitive. Trust me, you won't hurt any feelings. "I accept the offer" is professional enough. If you really want to say something, say something like I am happy we managed to reach an agreement, I am looking forward to joining the team. On an unrelated note: You could also say $(x + 3*(...


0

I actually just had this happen to me a few weeks ago. As part of the conditional offer packet they sent me, HR had accidentally printed out the internal job description which showed that I was being offered $20-$30,000 less than had been allocated for my position. As many have noted, companies will often try to lowball you to begin with, but I was ...


0

It's hard to know for sure without the specifics of your company and position they're hiring for, but as someone who's been responsible for hiring at small companies, there are explanations that have nothing to do with your negotiating skills or anything of the sort. We were looking to hire a number of people to cover a certain set of skills and were fairly ...


-2

It's not unethical, but it does tell you something: You are worth £8k more than you are being paid. They budgeted for £8k more and were apparently willing to pay that, but ended up getting you for less. So when asking about a raise you can point out that you are paid well below market rate, or just start looking for a job more in line with your worth. A ...


10

One point I don't see here is you don't mention your own skill level. Very frequently jobs are "XX-YY range based on experience" maybe in your case the range was 30-50k and the default was 40k and you're on the lower end of the experience expectations. In my current position the advertisement was 30-35k. When they finally came to it they put it smack down in ...


8

You may have been "cheated on" in the sense that the hiring manager was a better negotiator than you were, and they managed to get you to accept a lower salary than the one they were ready to offer. It's also possible that your skills were assessed during the interview and you were found less qualified than someone they expected to hire for this default ...


1

As others have said the company hasn't done anything unethical, and whilst it might feel unfair, that's the world of recruitment. You went in with an offer that, at the time, you felt was fair compensation for the work you were doing. The business had a guideline range of what they felt was fair. You both agreed that the amount put forward was the ...


0

Use the document to negotiate a future pay rise, either now or at a later date. This may or may not be the correct option for you personally but you should consider it before some of the more radical options.


19

Unethical or not doesn’t really matter, what matters is what you can do about it. If you think you should get a higher salary, then look for a different job. Preferably one that offers more. If you find one, sign a contract, give notice, and say goodbye. That’s the problem for companies lowballing you: They get you cheap, but they don’t keep you. If you’...


59

Let's put it this way: if you came by a store that sold your favorite candy for 10% less than other stores, would you think that buying there is somehow "unethical"? It's capitalism, right? You pick the best seller. That's not unethical, that's how the system works. If you want to look at the bright side: maybe they hired you over the other candidate, ...


15

Employers rarely start out offering the most they're willing to pay. They go in with the expectation that the candidate will try to negotiate a better deal. The note you saw was probably what they expected they would end up paying or possibly the maximum they could offer without having to request approval for a larger amount. Fair or unfair, it's the way ...


36

It's not unethical. They proposed an offer and you accepted it. That's the way it works. The fact that they would have paid you more if you had negotiated for more is immaterial.


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