New answers tagged

1

So - a big part of this is personal. Only you can know the impact that your work has on your personal life, and only you can know whether the compensation is necessary or adequate. Some thoughts about transitioning and negotiating to part-time, if that's what you want to do: A general approach with salaried work is to reduce the hours and the salary in ...


0

You know that these are highly difficult questions which no one here is really qualified to answer definitively except yourself? That being said, it's all about opportunity costs: Are you better off when leaving the company and trying to focus on your own project(s)? And what do you expect from starting your own company, more money or more fulfillment? If ...


3

What type of increase should I try to negotiate for on a new job in roughly the same field of practice? Or, should I not try to negotiate higher than what I'm currently being paid? There are very few positions whose salaries cannot be negotiated. In general always negotiate, even for internal salary increases. $5K raise on a $78K salary is a 6.5% increase ...


1

Rushing a decision may not be in your best interests, and that is across the board. In your case, you can rush Company A, by telling them that you have another offer on the table with a deadline, which is implicitly saying that no offer from them in that timeframe will end up with you going with Company B. If you are a big enough draw to Company A, and ...


3

Partial disclosure is called for. You want to accelerate A's response, so you tell them you have other offers and you'd very much like a reply by date X. If you haven't got a reply by date X, then if you need to turn down the offer from B, then do so. But you don't need to offer to A the information that you've done so, nor that you have no other offers ...


2

Something that has actually worked for me in the past is to say that you believe you need your salary to be readjusted, not just raised. I was asking for a bit less (15% increase) whereas the typical raise was around 2%. I laid out some research I had done on industry salary for similar positions and also researched the company pay scale and found out I was ...


-1

I'm thinking of asking for the 150k in exchange for scrapping the extra 200 shares and 5k signing bonus Do that. 130K is very tight in the Bay Area! Don't count on the RSUs at all. But I hope they work out well. It commits you to the company for that time. If you don't have major stuff to tote, then you do not need 5K for the relocation. Keep your options ...


2

You asked, In short, is the agency friend or foe? Neither - they're more like lawful neutral. They will generally follow whatever path has the best outcome for them. Sometimes, in a perfect world, that path also has a good outcome for the employer and the candidate. But in other situations, the three parties' objectives may not perfectly align, and some ...


1

You don't have to "threaten" to leave to imply strongly that this is a deal-breaker for you in continuing to stay at the company. You can state your case and explain it nicely. I have 2 children at home who I need to take care of, and so I need some allowance to work from home. Previously me and my wife have been doing our best to take care of the kids ...


3

The best way to tackle this is to ask directly. That should be done after some preparation: make sure you have a good plan and answers for all reasonable counter arguments. Something like this: Hey boss, due to my family situation with two small kids at home, it would help us enormously if I could work from home two days a week. I don't think this would ...


1

The recruitment agency takes a percentage of the salary that the client pays. In this case employee and agency share the same interest. No, the potential employee and the recruiting agency may share an interest, but it's not necessarily the same exact interest. Let's say a competing candidate (without an agency) is willing to work for $100,000 a ...


13

Whether you take the job or not makes a huge difference to the recruitement agency. They get paid, or they get not paid. The payment may be dependent on the salary, but that is a very minor amount to them. So the motivation of the recruitement agency is to do anything to make the company offer you the job and to make you accept the job. So if the ...


2

All in all, the first and foremost target for the recruitment agency is to get you a job, because then they will get their commission. If you don't get (or accept) the job, there's no incentive for them. So they will try to convince both the parties: The applicant: that the job is good, and should accept the payment offered. The organization: that the ...


9

We work to live, not the other way around. People have priorities, and they change (over time). If your changed life priorities warrants that you need to have the work arrangement changed, so be it. You are very right, never go into the mode where you want to "threaten" the employer, as I read so far your work experience has been good. You get into a ...


5

You are suggesting 10-15% after 6 months, there I would say in general no, not appropriate. In the first few months at a new company you still need to learn how everything works, what the projects are, familiarize yourself with everything. That means you are creating little to no value for the company. That's normal and expected, so no reason to worry about ...


9

Is it appropriate to request a salary raise after trial/probation period is complete? IMO asking for a raise after only 6 month, regardless of performance, could be seen as a little greedy, since you already had your 'Lohnverhandlung' (salary-discussion) during the hiring process just a couple of months ago. You and the company agreed on the terms and the ...


2

I simply want to know if it is appropriate to do so or not? It is only appropriate, if it can be justified. If you believe you're worth of getting paid more, prepare a case and present it to your boss and ask for a raise. Two things to keep in mind: Don't expect a raise because you feel like getting a raise. Don't be shy to ask for a raise if you feel ...


0

The professional thing to do is to keep your new employer informed of all the advice your doctor gives you as well as what you decide to do in accordance with that advice. Since you haven't even started, asking for a temporary remote position might be a tough sell, but it's worth asking for. You can still do 1-on-1 learning though conference calls and video ...


-8

The professional thing is to keep personal issues from affecting your work as much as possible. So my first recourse would be to talk to the doctor. Explain your situation and see if there is anything that can be arranged. I'd go see another doctor if the first can't solve issues like this. After that you can move forwards depending on the doctors advice.


16

Accepted a job in a new city, but then badly injured my leg. My doctor told me not to move now. What does professionalism require? Professionalism requires that you follow your doctor's directions. Give your new employer the worst possible April estimate (or a May estimate in case it takes you a couple of weeks to move cities once you're able to). ...


28

Given the way your issue has been handled by each company, I'd be revisiting the decision to leave. A supportive company is often worth more than a couple of dollars in the paycheck.


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