New answers tagged

0

The initial interview is not the right time unless you are specifically asked a question about that., Once you start it's too late if they're not going to accommodate you, asking earlier also means the desk should be there day 1. The right time to ask is at the offer stage, ideally if they contact you to say they will be making an offer you could raise it ...


0

"I hired this lady to help me start with a project" .... "she considers herself as a co-founder of the company" Well that's solved then. As co-founder she has access to the bank accounts and can pay herself whatever your Board of Directors will allow. "I'm willing to pay her small bonus out of my own pocket" ... ok, but did you really make a mistake? ...


16

Any ideas how should I handle this? Unless she has some sort of legal claim, essentially a contract that grants her XXXXXX, you should completely ignore this. Do not respond to her further. If she goes through the expense of obtaining legal council, then and only then, engage a lawyer on your behalf. Also, paying her when you don't have to might make ...


1

You have to decide if you are willing to risk it. Will they get the funding? Will they keep their promise? You have to decide how long you will wait for the deals to be completed, and for them to increase your pay. If you don't like the situation, then negotiate. But realize that you may not get what you want, or they may even decide to move on to the ...


1

Only you can determine what your acceptable salary is. Do you believe you'd be happy making that much at that company? Or do you believe you'd be better off waiting and hoping to get more at a different company? Benefits also play into it. Get information on the health insurance offered, if any, along with vacation time. If you get 2 weeks of ...


0

It's a little strange to offer a range, unless he's also offering a tradeoff between stock options / RSUs and money. If he is offering you a tradeoff, please ask another question with more details if you want our help. If it's not a tradeoff: Mentioning a range is probably your would-be boss's clumsy way of starting a salary negotiation. At this point in ...


0

do managers state the range of the salary they will offer Yes it did happen with me as in a big MNC. Your actual salary is decided by HR. Your manager may just have got approval to hire you and he must be aware that at this position, salary varies in this range. Once you say yes (verbally), they may request HR to roll-out a formal offer letter with final ...


9

This does not sound like an offer. It sounds like you were invited to partake in candidate assessment for a regular role. They are saying: "Now your internship is over, would you like to apply to transition across?". Internships do not always flow into regular employment, and not every intern will be invited. An actual offer will contain an exact figure ...


0

This is a very common HR 101 trick. Over time I am seeing this more and more from new job offers. It means nothing, it's just the first thing most hr recruiters will say right out of the gate during negotiations. Be polite, but ask why it's non negotiable. Be inquisitive and express your desire to find a compromise. See if you can talk to the hiring ...


4

Should I accept company A back instead? That would be my recommendation. What is the intention for company A to counter offer me since I already "betrayed" company A by switching to company B Exactly what your manager said: Team valued my potential and willing to learn attitude.


2

Well, you said company A is your dream job so I'd go with them. It's not about the money if both companies are offering the same amount. There's an old saying that if you ask for a certain price and the other guy says, 'yes' quickly then it means that you didn't ask for enough. Company A. must have been willing to pay you far more long before company B. ...


4

You should always negotiate your compensation if you feel you are being underpaid. The worst that can reasonably happen is your employer offering what you have already agreed to (in your case, the 6% raise). You can maximize your chances of improving your raise if you: Have a specific level of compensation ready when you approach your manager. E.g., "Next ...


1

It is not only all right, it's a tool to analyze a potential employer's worth regarding how they value their employees. Depending on the interviewing stage, there are different ways to tackle this. When the question is asked before a technical interview It will commonly be asked by HR, basically doing a radar sweep of the candidates to see where they ...


18

Employment is a market. Your potential employer is trying to get a sense of what level of compensation you are willing to accept. They do value you as a contributor of great work, but also want to pay a low price - so long as the price is fair. Give an expectation as your answer to questions about past income: “I don’t have a current salary to quote, but I ...


5

Yes, it is OK not to mention your current salary directly. Also, it's advisable that do not mention a direct figure for your expected salary either, instead engage in a communication / discussion where you can get to know how much the company is willing to offer you for that particular position / role. Check this other answer which details why the first one ...


8

In my experience, once your current boss has made it clear that you won't be getting a raise any time soon, despite his praise for your excellent performance, the only/best way for you to get your raise is to find a better paying job elsewhere. Every year you wait for some vaguely promised raise to materialize "next year" is another year you work for less ...


3

What you need to keep in mind is that you made a decision to join the company with the current renumeration and current role. No longer being in charge of 20 employees and missing out on 60k is a personal thing that you should have dealt with before accepting the offer. It is not your new company's fault you accepted the conditions of employment. If this is ...


1

I partially agree to above answers, but I also think it is possibly some sort of probation period contract, so I wrote down my experience FYI in case you really like this job and need careful considerations. I've worked for a Japanese MNC company before. What they did was providing me a 3-month contract initially, but also clearly stated inside contract ...


11

(The following is based on my limited personal experience (I am non-Japanese working in Japan for several years) and on what I gathered from talking to some Japanese friends, reading the Internet, etc. What I say below is true, but not universally true, and quite likely is not applicable to your situation. Still, it may help you to better understand their ...


3

There are several kind of employment contracts in Japan. It sounds like the tried to switch you from Seishain (permanent employee) to fixed term contract. This is actually quite common and doesn't mean the company don't want to keep you in the long run. This kind of contract usually comes with a higher pay due to the lower benefits. However, others concern ...


32

That is all about being a startup, possibly not related to Japan at all. From the offers, it's pretty clear that they are short on cash for what they are planing to do. Probably an initial funding is running out. So it's not that they do not want to give you a normal full time contract, it's that it increases their risk significantly. The risk is to run ...


2

If you don't have an alternative ($20 per day is too much, getting a car is not an option, no co-workers can drive you to work etc.), just keep biking to work. It's better than not showing up. You can't convince someone who won't listen to reason that the rules they set are stupid. Trying to do so will only make it more obvious that you're not going to ...


7

Resigning during the event is not a good option. Not only is your boss likely busy with other things, but in many cases there will be some formalities involved, if only writing a letter to HR. Do notice that a "2 weeks notice" is a minimum notice period. If you plan to leave 2 weeks after the company event, you can tell HR/your boss a week before the event ...


-2

Is there any provision about commuting in your contract that allows him to have a say in this matter? Because there isn't in the law. And his actions have to be based on something. The USA is a country following the rule of law, meaning he can't just make things up. He needs to have some kind of legal foundation for his request, otherwise it is just that: A ...


-4

Send out an email saying that your boss is no longer allowed to specify how employees do or don't get to work. Point out that if he's allowed to unilaterally change the terms of your employment and you have to accept it, then you too are allowed to unilaterally change the terms of your employment and he has to accept it. The way to stop people from being ...


109

No, it is not a standard practice in Japan. I think they are just a startup that can't afford to hire you on full-time at the price you are asking, so they are looking for alternatives. As for the short-term contract, they may have specific tasks in mind they would like you to handle, that they can't handle with their current resources. The part time ...


1

Resign before the team building event (this way it would show that you are firm on your decision) and attend the event gracefully. Resigning after the event will just buy you time for the inevitable. Negotiating a later start date depends how early the company wants to fill the position, the workload on the team and other factors.


8

There will never be a right moment to resign. No company is ever happy to see someone leave. (Well, unless you're very bad at your job) Once/if you have a signed offer, it's definitely better to resign before the team building event. But don't preemptively quit. Quitting right after the event might be awkward, but do it politely and professionally and you ...


1

In any employer-employee relation, there are benefits and disadvantages for employer and employee. For the employee what counts is salary, cost involved (for example for transport), being away from home, enjoying or hating the work or being with your colleagues and managers. If you find a position that benefits you more, you switch jobs (although switching ...


10

Have you actually met with your boss or sent him an email regarding this subject? Boss, Last week you mentioned workers are no longer allowed to commute to work by bicycle. I want clarification of this rule as this is my primary mode of transportation. Thank you. As far as I can tell though, there isn't anyway he can tell you what sort of activities you ...


-2

Thinking out loud here. What someone was driving to work and was in an accident? Ban driving to work? What if your Uber driver was in an accident, you were injured and missed work? Ban Uber? What if you lived close enough to work to walk, twisted an ankle and missed work? Ban walking? Is he purchasing bubble-wrap? What about company apartments within ...


181

So... you're in an ugly situation. Your boss is reaching out to control parts of your life that are not his to dictate, and is apparently of the unreasonable and domineering type who will react very poorly indeed to any pushback. As for what to do about it (while you look for another job), it looks like you have three options. You could keep biking in to ...


5

Unless you're working with an employment contract that allows your employer to dictate your travel behaviors (rare, but not inherently illegal or unheard of) it's quite obviously none of their business how you arrive at work. Given you said this, If you're going to suggest finding another job, that's a great idea, but without also suggesting what to do ...


5

Should I just keep biking in and see what he does about it, or start spending $20/day on Ubers to commute? Continue to use your preferred mode of transportation to go to work and don't worry about your manager's foolish request. If your manager attempts to discipline you in any way, I would escalate to HR or anyone higher up in the chain of your company. ...


45

Your manager can't dictate the mode of transport that you use for commuting. If he is as much concerned about the safety of employees while commuting, and insists on using (or avoiding) a particular mode of transport, either: ask them to get you reimbursed for the viable mode by the company, or provide a company operated safer mode of transportation.


8

Your boss does not get to make decisions for you outside the office. He doesn't choose your dinner, shampoo, entertainment, hobbies. So why would he get to decide your mode of transport. He may be able to keep you from parking your bike on company property. So perhaps lock you bike up off campus but in a safe and secure manor.


10

No, they won't. Unless hiring manager in A is buddies with the hiring manager in B, and they're both particularly psychotic, that's not gonna happen. It's possible but highly unlikely. Regardless, it's not a good idea to forward your other offer letters in this way. If you withheld, you would've gotten B's counter-offer, which would likely be less than A, ...


1

Yes it is. You are preparing for an internal meeting - internal meetings are part of your Job. You would prepare for a 121 meeting with your manager on company time or an internal project meeting. This meeting is part of that whole process of your personal development.


1

This is a lot of work, but it's work for your own benefit, not your company's (similar to interviewing at another company, or even mowing your lawn). As such you should do it on your own time. Some workplaces will be OK with you doing personal tasks on company time, as long as it doesn't impact what you deliver. You'll need to judge whether this is ...


7

During the interview process, nothing is private and everything is on the record. That's perhaps a slight exaggeration, especially when it comes to personal information, which may even be illegal to share beyond a certain point. And a "chat" you specifically asked for may be less on the record than an official interview (but still not private). Although it'...


3

In some places, part of the "interview process" is to meet the team you will be working with. This gives them chance to see you and you them. They can ask better technical questions and, when I had one like that, it had less "pressure" but they felt it was more effective than the structured interview with the managers...


2

The time to do that was really kind of before you're faced with accepting or declining an offer. I'm not sure how one would go about making that request. I'd worry that they'd let you speak to their handpicked people, for one. It's really hard to know you'd get an honest answer. I'd suggest that if you have some questions regarding policy, just ...


17

Go for it! It’s not unusual to request a number of phone calls with potential colleagues or to visit a new workplace before accepting an offer. Talking to potential peers and managers is a very prudent step in your job search. Ask the recruiter or hiring manager to help you organize some phone calls with potential peers. Or, if you’re not relocating for the ...


0

I think a lot of people miss the type of the job in this case. Handing out flyers is a job where the budget more often than not isn't spend on hours worked or flyers spent but for the service of handing out flyers on that day or for that occasion. So it might be possible to let your people come half an hour later or let them leave a little earlier to ...


0

Is OSHA aware of this? It might just be a very good time for "someone" to "anonymously" tip them off. They'll make an inspection and smell tobacco smoke. Problem solved without you having to say a thing to those smokers.


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