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10

In the UK, by law you have to give one week notice if you worked with the employer for up to two years, after two years it increases by one week for every year. If you have a contract, the notice period for both sides is usually longer. If you haven't been given a contract yet, the notice period by law would apply, so one week. If you want to leave and they ...


7

Have you considered thanking the CEO for his consideration and informing him that you would love to work with him again in the future? If you stay in touch, you can always return a few years after the reorganization. If you are remembered well, you'll have a much better bargaining position. I suspect that you feel conflicted about leaving, because you had ...


5

Yes you can stay. If your current employer agrees, you can withdraw your notice and continue your employment. Your new company will be disappointed when you inform them you will not be starting with them after all. They'll only be disappointed though, not angry; candidates sometimes accept counter-offers so they'll understand your position. You should be ...


4

While career advice is not encouraged on this site, I can give my perspective. If they valued you, they should value you when you were staying. Now they are only trying to reduce attrition which will look bad on them. Even if you stay, there will be unspoken tension that you got your promotion as an attempt to hold you back and they may try to compensate at ...


2

It's entirely up to YOU to either: Accept the position that is currently offered to you. Wait for the other potential offer in the hope that it comes to be. There are risks associated with either choice that you need to consider. My own philosophy is to "let your yes be yes and your no be no". That means if you accept the first offer you should ...


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