Hot answers tagged

141

[....] the salary annexure and appointment letter will be issued on your joining. So, basically you're expected to accept an offer and join the work without having any written proof of appointment and confirmed agreement on your payout? Anything which is not a part of written agreement from proper authority, is not part of any agreement, at all. If I ...


70

What should I do? Learn a lesson, hope company A does not initiate legal action against you, and move on. Can I file complaint against him or his organization? Forget you ever thought of this; you are the one at fault here. To elaborate, unless company B used physical means to snatch that letter out of you (which constitutes a criminal case against ...


64

In my opinion (not sure of the US law, IANAL), someone's pregnancy status has nothing to do with a new job or job application. It's a part of human life - no one is going to mark you as dishonest for availing the maternity leave (assuming you are entitled1) when you need it. The organization you want to work for, should support you in your life events, too. ...


55

So is this offer letter legally correct or not? It doesn't matter. You should walk away even if it is legal. It's already a big red flag in terms of professionalism to not by default include salary in an offer letter. But to outright refuse when pressed? You're 100% in not-legitimate territory here. There's simply no reason why this would be their policy ...


32

My manager seems to think it will take time for me to deal with everything, and it's okay for him to explain me everything I need, and that I'm not really productive right now. You seem to be in good company and management, most of the folks complains about just the opposite. You manager understands your situation and extending the help they can to bring ...


30

In the United States they can't ask, even if you are visibly pregnant. But since you aren't pregnant there is zero reason to tell them your plans. You will not be dishonest by keeping this private, even if it turns out you are already pregnant. One thing to consider before deciding to switch companies, understand what leave you have with your current ...


27

A job-offer letter is just a contract where you say "I promise to work for you" and the other parties say "in return I promise the following things..." That is all it is. You could have a job offer that says "I promise to come and drink your coffee once a week" and "In return we promise to loudly yell insults" This job offer would be both legal and ...


24

I am unclear how he 'forced' you to show him the offer letter. If he said he wouldn't make you an offer without you disclosing the confidential letter from company B. It is your fault you gave in to that, you weren't forced. What you should do is learn to walk away. The boss of company B sounds like a jerk, you don't want to work for a jerk. You certainly ...


21

Why not use this opportunity to make some more acquaintance and friends? Don't outright reject the idea of attending the party - Go ahead, give it a try. What's the worst that can happen - that you'll have no new acquaintance - same as now? However, look at the bright side - you may actually find out some like-minded colleagues which whom you can start ...


18

Simply point out that you cannot consider leaving your existing position until you have the received and reviewed the full details of what they are offering, including any terms or agreements they expect you to sign.


17

I believe if the company had a proper hiring procedure, they should have a clear idea about my competencies within the 3 interviews they have conducted face 2 face. I've hired more than 300 people (mostly software engineers of different seniority, UX, researchers, project managers). And there is no hiring procedure good enough to understand how somebody ...


16

Am I being too difficult and egoistic or Is reference check a common thing that I need to follow and respect without questing it? Yes, you are. Reference check is common. The references are not really to check on your technical competencies, rather to check on your background and behavioral aspects. Through the interview process They don't know how you ...


16

Do I have to persevere, until I get to understand things better Yes. I have been developing software, as a freelancer for *cough* decades, and there is a point in every project, usually after 3 or 4 weeks, where I feel hopeless & think that I will never learn it. This passes every time, and knowing that helps me prevent depression/hopelessness. It's ...


13

In the future, do not accept an offer until you've seen the written contract (and possibly the employee manual if the contract refers to it in any way). In the meantime, proceed as if you don't have a contract yet, because you don't. Keep on interviewing with other places. Do not stop. Do not slow down. If currently employed, do not quit until you have ...


11

Am I being too difficult and egoistic or Is reference check a common thing that I need to follow and respect without questing it? In my view, yes. Reference checks can help fill out a sense of how a candidate is as an employee, how they fit in the wider picture of the company rather than just "can they do skilled task x". It's a lot easier for someone to ...


11

There is nothing you can do. You've already screwed up. This is what you should have told them instead. "I'm sorry, but I can not in good conscience forward a private communication sent to me from another potential employer." Please note the purposefully vague language I'm using here. It's important to not even disclose the name of ...


11

Interesting situation. There is no need to tell them you’re trying to get pregnant. It’s your right to try, and their risk if it happens. To consider: what will your current company do if you get pregnant? Will you get maternity leave, get your job back when you return to work? Same at the new place? The new job seems an excellent opportunity even if it’...


10

This is India. TL;DR Incidents like this used to happen in the past, happening at present and WILL continue to happen in future. You cannot expect any sense of ethics from the most companies and their HR representatives. Do not hesitate to help them realize the taste of their own medicine. Write your reviews in Glassdoor, Indeed, MouthShut, LinkedIn, ...


10

I just want to chime in since every existing answer thinks you did something wrong. It's possible that in your location/field it's considered unacceptable to share information about offers, but that's certainly not always the case. At least in the United States and with software engineers, telling a company you have an offer from another is completely 100% ...


10

Unlikely. When you are a student, the expectation is your studies take priority. Internships exist to teach students about the working world and give the company a bit of a labour boost while you're at it. And hey, after your studies are done and you've proven to be an asset, maybe they might help you skip the job hunting stage and let you come back to work ...


9

Is it okay to negotiate salary and remote work at the same time? TL;DR: Is is OK and it is expected. Think about this: in the job offer, if the organization mentioned only one responsibility and after accepting the offer, they tell you about another responsibility, and after joining, they tell you about several more - how would you feel? Put all terms and ...


9

It is noble that you intend to be transparent with your new employer. However, it's important to remember that until your girlfriend has accepted a firm offer and made a clear commitment to her potential new employer, the plans you're talking about are essentially hopes and not concrete plans. And, to be clear, it doesn't make sense to be transparent about ...


9

Agree, looks super fishy. If you have a choice, leave this company in your tracks and don't look back. On the other hand, if you have nothing to lose and have NO other options, go to your first day and see if they going to scam you and for how much. Don't sign anything binding and be prepared to walk away. P.S. Please keep us posted.


9

Talk to your employer, and see what's possible! Normally I would advise against soliciting private information to your new employer, but in this case, it should not harm to discuss possibilities with them. As I see it, you can not really lose anything here. Worst case, they can't do anything to help you. You can still decide if you want to stay and let ...


8

If you spend a lot of time alone, and do things alone, your colleagues will think that you want to be alone, or that you are anti-social / unsocial / asocial. Either way, they made the right decision and they respect your space. If you want to fit into the culture and socialize with your colleagues, you need to adopt (at least partially) their way of being /...


7

I am rejecting this idea NOT because I can't provide the reference, but because it is against what I believe is right. We each have the ability to stand up for what we believe is right and what we believe is important. Am I being too difficult and egoistic or Is reference check a common thing that I need to follow and respect without questing it? ...


7

I think this will be a fine opportunity to "break the ice" and start getting better acquainted with your fellow workers. I suggest you consider going. I know that this may be easier said than done, but I encourage you to make an effort and try to go and socialize and meet new people. No need to have a "smart" or "witty" topic of conversation, just be ...


6

Given that you have answered all the questions truthfully, and did not intentionally hide / withheld information, you don't need to be worried. If you were not asked / expected to reveal any particular information, you don't need to provide it. Just give it a couple more days. Check back same time next week, if you don't get to hear in the meantime.


6

Remember this next time someone tries to push you around. Some people will exploit you. Some people will lie to you. Some people will take advantage of you. This is an almost inevitable certainty. You'll never be able to prevent it completely, but you can learn from past mistakes to help avoid future ones. The next time someone tries to pressure you to ...


6

Nobody can say for sure, but this is a feeling that many people have. One little tip that is important: If you learn something from person X make sure you remember it or write it down. I have often worked in companies where some employees(including younger me) would use 1 or 2 senior developers as personal Google and ask them things that were explained to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible