Hot answers tagged

191

I suggest that instead of telling them you can't take the job you tell them the problems you're facing. Ideally, you would have some proposed solutions as well. For example, are their people all working remotely? Perhaps you could start remotely also and move there when things settle down. Is your biggest issue finding an apartment? Perhaps they have some ...


129

is it a good idea to work extra without claiming hours in order to make up for my incompetence and distractions? No. It's a horrible idea. In addition to doing all the bad things that overtime normally does to you, it will also not solve your problem. You say your problem is that due to your competence level and distraction level, you are not efficient ...


53

How soon should I inform this employer that I cannot begin working for them? Is there any etiquette or legal guideline I should follow? The proper etiquette when your situation has changed is to inform the employer as soon as possible, so that they can make other plans. In your case, the right thing to do is to tell them today. There is no advantage to ...


14

At our company we hire new interns every quarter or so. Our main motivations to do so are as follows: To explore new technologies/techniques that we don't have the time to explore for (i.e. product development, R&D) To train and select new junior engineers we can hire Note that in both options we don't actually need any output. When we have someone ...


12

You've been there for three days. Three. Days. That's not enough time to get a complete picture of how the work is going to be - in the mean time there's lots to be positive about, the company is stable and if your coming into it on the back of an unpleasant and stressful environment then maybe a bit of an easier time is just what you need. Also if you were ...


10

Remember that being an intern means "knowing how to do the job. not how to make is perfect, on time and alone". Those three factors are things you learn during the intership. Work on your communication skills (for example: gather your questions during the day and ask them in the morning the next day during a Q&A or standup). Remove distractions:...


7

I am sure there's a canonical question this should be a duplicate of, but the right answer is always: Get a firm written offer in hand from another company (after any negotiation of terms) Accept it, with a defined start date greater or equal to the notice you will provide in step 3 Notify your current direct manager and HR rep of what your last day at your ...


7

This might start out as a "simple" lie-of-ommission, where you leave the company off your resume, however it's almost inevitable that at some point someone, whether it's in the hiring process or even after you've joined, is going to ask what you did during the two "missing" weeks, even if it's just casually. At that point you're going to ...


6

I would be very careful about spending a lot of hours extra unpaid in the office. It might not necessarily give a good impression. Instead of looking eager and hardworking, it clearly communicates to your colleagues and manager that you can't do your work in the allotted time. Your low productivity, which on the moment might just be in your head, might get ...


5

It is understandable why you agreed, you want to be a team player but unfortunately your company took advantage of this. I would suggest you have a meeting with your manager immediately and put together an action plan, it could look something like: Remind your manager of your area of expertise and that it is not this current technology and that you only ...


5

How could the answer be anything other than "As soon as possible"? You have made an agreement with this company, on the basis of which they are allocating resources and making plans. The longer you leave it; the worse situation they are going to be in. If this isn't obvious to you on reflection, then I think the company dodged a bullet. ...


4

I was there not long ago (I have a couple of years experience in DevOps), so I will give you my opinion. Feel free take it. I understand where you're coming from. New job, so much to learn, so many changes. Most of the time, you barely understand what's going on. Imposter Syndrome is always behind you because "everyone seems to be doing so much better ...


4

UPDATE Since your team and manager are working remote (this is challenging for everyone) your self-starting leadership is even more important since everyone is busy running the business. As an SE you know how unsettling to teams having an unknown person with access to the codebase. (I have seen horror.) Perhaps, Ask if you can be included in status emails ...


4

My number one rule is this: More of what does not work, does not work If you're not at the level you need to be, working more at that level does not bring you up to where you need to be. If your work is sub-par (although you say that your coworkers don't believe so) then you need to bring yourself up to where you need to be. If you're distracted, find ways ...


4

Would you suggest reaching out to HR or the hiring manager directly through email and send them my things? As this is not required, I don't know if doing this is appropriate. I don't have personal connections with the firm [...] I'm also not sure who the hiring manager is, but through Linkedin search I identified a person that I believe is very likely to be ...


3

A great way to get your resume "on top of the stack" is to ask someone you know already working at the company to refer you. Often times, employees have access to hiring managers and internal recruiters representing those jobs. Managers and recruiters love getting direct referrals. It's far better a way to get good candidates than scanning for keywords in ...


3

In most jobs you'll spend most of your first week settling in, going through training and other slightly tedious things - you're rarely going to be stretched too far. Give it a few weeks (at least) and see if you're still feeling the same way. If you are, talk, to your manager and explain that you're not feeling very challenged.


2

Scrum daily stand-up meetings are a specific sort of meeting, intended as a quick check that everybody is making progress towards their goal. They are only supposed to be about: What you did yesterday. What you intend to do today. Is anything blocking you from doing what you need to do? It doesn't matter if you don't understand what some other people are ...


2

Checkout your chat tool if you have one: Often there are additional "#fun" or "#spam" channels that are meant for off-topic conversation. If there is none, maybe at some point suggest one - unless everyone is doing small talk in one of the main channels anyway. If you have something to discuss/clarify that takes more than one or two ...


2

You can share hobbies and other fun facts in a variety of ways. Start meetings with 5 minutes of small-talk it creates a habit of encouraging some informal conversation and primes people for the discussion as well. Remember key dates and do something about it like The date the employee was hired and The birthday of the employee.


2

I will echo what other say but I suspect this was the idea all along. As you've said the other developers refused so what I think happened is that they first asked everyone who would be able to do the job and they all refused. Then they hired externally (you) and bait and switched you to do this job. This is what they wanted all along. So setting goals about ...


2

In the USA, if you're a freelance contractor, your clients have limited ability to control your schedule, place of work, and other aspects of your arrangement with them. Misclassifying you could be a potential issue for them with the IRS. That being said, you don't need anything in your contract that stipulates your time off. That's completely at your ...


2

Try common package names or things like “RStudio” Job descriptions rarely have just the programming language. They also have the tools you will use and the frameworks and packages which are frequently used there.


2

While I generally agree with answer given by DarkCygnus that it's best to follow the process, I think it's important to point out that there are times when it makes sense to circumvent it. It is especially true when the way you would be perceived through the process is very unlikely to land you the job. Sometimes you are dead on arrival and you know it. And ...


2

You seem to expect a LOT from other people here - it's rare for anyone to land an ideal job where everything is just as they'd like - this doesn't sound like a nightmare so first up have some perspective. You've acknowledged that your manager is swamped - he has given you what he can - any more input from him will have to wait. The main lesson here is DON'T ...


2

To address this particular point: coworkers seem to be getting tired of constant questions Questions are not a problem in themselves — everyone has to learn!  And it's better to ask than remain ignorant.  But if your coworkers are getting tired of answering questions, you might want to double-check that you're not asking them unnecessarily. In particular: ...


2

I'm currently doing a software development apprenticeship in the UK which is (hopefully) comparable to an internship. In my opinion, the only extra time you should be doing outside of work is research in your field that is not directly work related - e.g. if work uses Technology X and you thing it is cool, try making your own thing with Technology X and have ...


2

I, for one, personally do not make choices based on some future event that might happen. Accept the current opportunity, make the most of it, and when time comes, look for a better one. Assuming the only deciding factor here is career path / growth, I'd say, accept the offer for the Regional office, move other there, show your skills - that you can be ...


1

If you are a senior software developer, then you need to take these things in hand instead of passively waiting. Introduce yourself to the team in slack and organize a call to meet them face to face. You don't need a manager to do that, she doesn't even need to attend (invite her as a courtesy). Ask them if there are regular meetings (standups, team ...


1

You can rephrase your question to: "The work I've been given to do is not challenging". That is very different. If it isn't challenging then do you have spare time, or are you bogged down with huge piles of meaninglessness? If it's the former, start making yourself invaluable. I certainly wouldn't give a new hire something critical to do until ...


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