Hot answers tagged

145

Please don't judge the organization based on a group email from Human Resources! They probably have a new-hire checklist they're following. They probably have a few-years-old email message they send to everybody. They, almost certainly, did not write this email and have superficial knowledge (if that) of what it contains. Plus, they mentioned "topics ...


21

So they want you to give up a job without the reassurance of future employment. The sensible course of action is to say no. You do have rent to pay etc...


19

When you're struggling with a task at work the professional thing to do is make this visible and ask for help. Your manager and team are there to support you, so if you need assistance, time, advice, or anything else then you should raise it as early as possible.


14

Last month, I received an email from HR asking me to go through a list of topics which might be helpful for me during the training period. Frankly speaking, I was not impressed by the list of topics provided. Most of topics I was very familiar with. Since most of the selected students were from professional degree A and only a few were there from B, it was ...


11

1) As several answers have said, show them your degree. A simple proof of degree is enough, no detail needed. Perhaps "please contact Mr X at Y university alumni office to confirm this, if needed" The other 2 things are far more important: 2) Ensure you act * completely * professionally I cannot emphasise this enough. You are far more likely to do ...


10

Before thinking about the video, do this simple exercise: describe yourself in 100 words, then 50, then 30, then 10. Next, think about the job you are interviewing for, and see how you can tweak your introductions to make them relevant and engaging, mentioning key terms related to your achievements, expertise and qualities. 20 seconds can be very short or ...


10

Unfortunately, I don't think any of us can answer whether or not your boss (or anyone else) found this presumptuous. It'll depend heavily on the culture and your boss's attitudes and approach to work management. Some bosses might like this. Some might think you're out of line. As a frame challenge to your question, I think it would be reasonably low effort ...


9

Consider taking your recent experience as having a potentially very positive impact on your future. As an employer, and a hiring manager, I like to see candidates who can fail, learn from the failure, and then grow as a result. No matter what your career, or how much change you're actually looking for, none of us are perfect, and none of us are complete ...


9

I already have a job (courtesy campus placements) and now I don't know what should I do with this month. First of all you should enjoy yourself. Travel, visit friends and family, relax - whatever you like to do. You'll be starting a job and may not have much time off for a while. Then, you can learn what you feel you'll be using on the job. This isn't ...


9

No, there will be no negative impact, unless you create one. However, before you take the decision, make sure of one thing: the reason for which you left the organization earlier, is not present currently (to the best of your ability to foresee). If you think that problem (or side effects) are not relevant to the (re)new engagement - by all means, feel free ...


9

As very well noted in other answer and comment, talk to your potential manager ASAP. Do not wait until your meeting next week. Be prepared that confessing about the lie will most likely lead to disqualification. Good that you are planning on confessing, better to do it before the company starts the background check and approach your school. I'm not sure ...


7

IMHO you are being a little naive and you are not judging the situation and it’s potential for you correctly. Or you completely misunderstood what that company does and should be looking for completely different job in some highly specialized areas. Let me expand: If you are familiar with all those topics and you can skip all those trainings - that means ...


5

Update your resume, polish your skills. Your resume doesn't need to mention that you were on maternity. Leave that to the interviews. As for your skills, you should practice these and brush up on the things you don't feel confident on. Do as much practice and preparation as you can before going into interviews. Make sure you can still implement all your ...


5

I say this from the perspective of an Employer - Show them your degree Apologize for your mistake. Make sure you don't repeat your mistakes. It's OK to sometime make mistakes but not the same ones and not too frequently. Forget, move on, work hard and be happy. Have a positive outlook and try to develop a positive intent mindset. It will take you a long ...


5

I have financially gone very weak and badly looking for job. Shall I indicate it to John? No. Why would you? It's completely irrelevant. You're looking for a job because you need to earn a living. That is the reason everyone takes a job. You are not unique in that respect. They don't need to know anything about your current financial situation. I got ...


4

What to do? Your job. You practically volunteered for this job so at this point it's too late to go back without damaging your reputation at this workplace. As you said a 2-3 month job will look bad on your resume so your only other option is to take on this task head on and do your best. Depending on what kind of personality your boss is (is he sales or ...


4

Usually there is no problem in working again for a previous employer, as long as it is good for you. For example, I was in a company where I had stagnated, where I was the unofficial leader of the team but was trying to make it official. Since that would involve payment raise, I was having trouble achieving it. I then received an invitation to join another ...


4

I'd suggest three things: Practice the skills, take some online courses or join coding bootcamps. Update your CV, contact the recruiters for openings in the domain. Attend the interviews. If you crack the interview, good. If you don't succeeded, go back to step 1. There is no silver bullet, and this is same for you or for anyone else looking for a new job....


4

No, do not mention your financial situation to anyone. He's a former colleague and soon-to-be manager, not your wife. Don't worry about the rumours either, there's nothing you can do about that but treat it as a positive thing. Your former colleague wants to schedule an interview, so he already knows you're good for the team. Finally, you reek of ...


3

It sounds like you have a good relationship with your manager, so I suggest that you ask both questions of your manager. You'll get the best answers there. Q1. Is my action considered presumptuous especially since multiple members on the team concurred that the request was not needed for the project? I don't think it's presumptuous at all -- sounds like ...


3

I have financially gone very weak and badly looking for job. Shall I indicate it to John? Would it look bad upon me? (He was my colleague then. But now he is manager) No, just wait until the recruiter or hiring manager asks for your salary expectations to even broach the salary conversation. Don't lowball yourself because you are desperate - you should ...


2

As an employer, I really don't care if you quit or even give any notice. I am not sure why so many people over think this scenario. We receive 100's of applications for each job, and we interview nearly a dozen of those people. If you quit, we often have a whole list of other people to make a job offer. If you politely tell them it is not working for you,...


2

I'm not sure how to present my reasons for wanting to leave the company after just a few months You don't. "I've found an exciting new opportunity, that's a really good fit for me" is more than enough reason. There are situations, where going deeper is actually a constructive and good thing to do, but these rare.


2

They asked me whether I'd like to join [this project], and my mistake was saying 'yes'. This is the future you chose, sadly. Turn it into an opportunity to learn, even if that is: Don't be timid with work decisions Backpedaling decisions is very costly so don't let momentary pressure cause you to make a haphazard decision (including leaving the project!)....


2

I definitely think you should hold off on flat out agreeing to their current terms. I've had a Spanish company send me an offer letter (which was signed and returned), then reassure me multiple times that "you have the job"... When I inquired about a hard start date so that I could give notice at my current job, they went silent for many months. This sounds ...


2

As an educator in engineering myself. I have to say...I'm a bit offended at the question really. But not by you, to make things clear. I'm not really sure where it's coming from... To answer your broad question, You should learn what you want to learn...It was the entire point of your degree...you studied engineering, because it's what you wanted to do ...


2

If you're serious about this new career, then make sure a new experience at Company B (or another company) won't end in the same result. The reason was a mix of bad feedback from their part ... Feedback can be really valuable. Spend some time to take it in and see if you can find instances in which your actions (or inaction) caused issues highlighted in ...


2

You don't mention which country you are in. But I think you're not thinking this out properly. You say you're considering rejecting the offer. But you have already accepted the offer, by this previous email exchange. In many places this alone would be considered a contract. So what you're really considering here is quitting before you start the job you ...


2

Inform your hiring manager ASAP, but do it in person or over a phone, so as to both impart more urgency and leave less of a paper trail. Don't say you lied and don't make excuses, just state as a matter of fact that your application was incorrect. People know what it means, but it's best not to admit to more than you need to. Lies about education are the ...


2

Get in touch with your recruiter and get clarity as to when or how soon are you expected to join the job? And how far can the joining date be pushed if you are thinking about taking a break between jobs? You can (should) ask this question without mentioning anything about your current situation/dilemma or any plans whatsoever. Asking over an email is best. ...


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