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42

Does doing double job counts as double experience? TL;DR - No. To elaborate, in most of the cases, the required year of experience is required to measure the exposure of someone into different phases / scopes / activities / responsibilities of the job, not only the amount of time spend doing the same thing. For example, a software / IT professional with 5-...


10

You just have to be professional about it and let company A know ASAP that you won't be joining them because you had an offer elsewhere which better matches your long term goals. No need to name company B in that communication. I'm sure a few bridges will be burned, but if you're at company B for the long term, it won't really matter.


9

I don't think there's a right or wrong here. I'd certainly apply for the job and in the application make sure they know that your company OK'd you working two places at once. Just list your jobs as they are and don't list a "accumulated work experience", then they can make the decision of how they want it to count. Keep in mind that 2+ years usually doesn'...


5

do they just want to stare at my screen on my laptop to see how I proceed making decisions and coding? If they just wanted to do that, chances are they would have just given you a take home exercise. This will almost certainly (primarily) be a test of how well you work with, and fit into the team, while performing some simulated task. Generally speaking, ...


5

You have no formal offer from company A. Even if you did, letting them know as soon as possible is the right thing to do. You can outline the facts: your salary, benefits, and responsibilities are better at company B. Please keep your opinion about company B being better than A to yourself. If they are a reasonable company, then you will not be ...


3

Different tech companies have very different standards of attire. Some of the more modern companies (or those who pretend to be modern) pride themselves by how lax their dresscode is and that even the CEO comes to work wearing a polo shirt. This trend was set by successful tech company managers like Steve Jobs or Mark Zuckerberg who rarely appeared with ...


3

Remember that you're interviewing them also. Treat it like you would any working session with a client, and get to know the people you're working with. We can't tell what they're looking for (apart from a days free labor from you), but I'd recommend that you go in with an open mind and see if you enjoy the people and the experience. (personally.. if a ...


3

You should definitely announce your resignation early enough. Also, be careful about the company's policies, about mixing resignations and vacations. Some companies do not allow using the notice period for vacations.


2

A note as a person involved in the recruitment process looking for people who make their passion their profession. At our company, we count experience in years. A year (usually) has 365 days. Each day has 24 hours. We assume one year's experience means that someone slept 8 hours a day and worked full time during the remaining 16 hours, for 365 days. This ...


2

IT tends to be relaxed. I have had bosses who wore flip-flops and shorts in the day to day office life, dressing fancier to visit clients. It varies wildly from company to company. I would drop the suit and the tie and overdress a little just to get the feeling of the company. You can always go shopping after you leave work.


1

You can always start with your current outfits, then joke about how you’re overdressed, then buy clothes that match the standard. Deviate slightly in the direction that you prefer.


1

future colleagues wearing trousers and dress shirts This would appear to be the acceptable attire. Don't worry too much about overdressing at the start, it happens. But ideally you fit in fairly well from day one. So trousers and dress shirt, worry about the shoes later. The more casual the culture, the less they worry about brands I would think. I've ...


1

Start looking for a new job if this one is not a good fit. From what you're saying, you don't want to continue in this job anymore so do it now - don't waste your and your company's time. Either way I’m concerned that if I leave the job before reaching a year there it will look bad on my resume. Not if you tell the interviewer that it was not a good fit ...


1

Start looking now. There's no reason not to start looking, get some feelers out with recruiters, and plan to change your career come the new year. Depending on your location and specific industry background, it could take a few months to find something decent. Unless you are going through a clearance process, there's no reason to include the job on your ...


1

I was nearly in this position in 2011 (IIRC). I dreaded the idea of calling my boss while on vacation and giving her that news. I ultimately decided not to take the new job (due to other considerations, not due to the potential awkwardness of the phone call I was going to have to make). But that's what I would suggest: Call your manager, today, and give ...


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