Hot answers tagged

95

In the interview, simply ask what their flexible working policy is and indicate that you've found remote working to be productive in the past. Then see what their policy/approach is and work from there. You'll probably find out here at what point you'll be allowed to work remotely (e.g. after the probation period has elapsed). You need not make a big deal ...


52

Please do not try to drown the noise with loud sound on headphones, that will damage your hearing permanently... Providing a 'sensible' and comfortable work environment is up to your company, if your manager didn't solve it (I personally consider this a failure on his part, if I'm honest, especially if that is a known problem for his whole team), consider ...


30

In a similar vein to Snow's answer, you're free to ask about how flexible their work policies are. It will likely come up in an interview, depending on the questions they ask, and you can seamlessly talk about your successes in that remote work environment without having to awkwardly bring it up out of context. However, since you are relatively ...


24

You might consider negotiating your offer outside of the interview. Keep the interview to demonstrating your capabilities and asking questions that will help you decide if an opportunity with the company would be exciting. Instead of asking for remote work in an interview, express you desire for remote days to the recruiter. He or she can help you ...


13

The marketing people in the area next to you are paid professionals at work. Disrupting the office with raucous laughter and shouting is not professional. I recommend politely and professionally confronting Team Noise. Better yet, consider asking your manager to confront them. You've already raised this concern with your manager, but in your proposed ...


13

You should report to both companies. As a security clearance holder, your responsibility to report foreign travel is to the government, not to a particular company. Your company's security officer is just who you work through to report anything you need to. Depending on your clearance, you are usually required to report planned foreign travel before the ...


11

I would suggest that you talk to your recruiter/ hiring manager, discuss your predicament with them and see what they can do for you. This could include the shifting of joining date by a couple of weeks, them providing you a temporary accommodation for a few weeks (This is common in my location for new employees who relocate, not sure about UK), or them ...


11

Generally, you just ask for yourself and let the team sort things out for themselves. Typically, you'd ask your manager first as there might be departmental cost codes and approval processes for this kind of thing.


11

I was in a bit of a hard situation, needed a new job quickly. I accepted one and now I discover I'm expected to take over tasks an intern should be doing. [...] I'm not sure what the best way to proceed here will be. I've tried offering taking offer more complex tasks but this has been turned down and received badly. The money is ok-ish, it was a ...


10

You tell your manager/friend right after you send your resignation letter to HR. Not before. And don't feel bad leaving him. It was his decision to make a career change. You are not being compensated for that (and it appears, neither is he). Depending on how good a friend he is, you can tell him in an unofficial setting you think he's in a bad position and ...


8

We can't answer this for you. Which do you value more, money or happiness? It seems like those are the two choices you're debating.


8

I had the exact same problem you're having once. My patience became very short and I felt like the noise was going to drive me insane. The solution was a pair of ear buds with rubbery tips. These work way better than even construction worker's noise reducing head phones (I know because I tried those first!). And you don't have to have the volume up much. ...


7

I would go down the route of; I applied for a more senior role, and was told that as long as I proved capable within the first few months I would be quickly promoted, can I please have some feedback on how you think I am doing and if there is anything I need to focus on specifically to help obtain the senior position as discussed :)


7

Any time a person is planning the next step in their career, the advise is generally the same (even if you're switching industries or jobs): Determine your ultimate goal. You want a career in cybersecurity. Check off this step. Determine your next step to reach that goal. You've correctly identified that you likely won't be hired into a high level position ...


6

The first thing you can do with the Conference room suggestion is to leave a note on your normal table, either physical or on the computer screen (a screensaver) or both telling people where you are. You should also update anyone who might meet you during the day, or is likely to look for you, that you will be working from a conference room. On a more ...


6

It's not that uncommon to use it when it's not formal. It's a way of saying: "It's still open for negotiations". I assume that as soon as the offer transforms to being formal in nature, it will be much more defined. I have also seen it used from companies that pay you hourly. Some months are longer than others, so the pay will fluctuate a little.


6

I'm wondering whether this is normal. How to understand whether I'm the problem or the environment is? Based on your description, seems that these things they are asking you to do are only expressed verbally. A way to avoid communication problems and "that's not what I wanted" situations is to write down what is asked and expected, instead of only agreeing ...


5

Do as thorough a hand over as you can and work to set them up as well as possible prior to your departure. That's about all there is to it really. Most will probably realise that you aren't doing this to them; you aren't deliberately making their lives harder. People move on - it's the nature of jobs. If anyone takes it personally, well there's probably not ...


4

I would tell that friend before accepting any offer that you have applied to several job positions because of your current financial position and your career prospects. Make it very clear that you did not look for a new job because your friend was promoted manager, but because you feel it is in your best personal and professional interest.


3

If flexibility is important for you, you may want to consider picking job offers from companies which advertise flexible hours or remote work. It is now widely understood that flexible working conditions constitute an advantage, so companies which are able to offer such flexibility to you usually advertise it. Interviewing with the right companies from the ...


3

When you ask it for the entire team, it looks like you're not having any problems but just want better monitors.That may or may not work as the managers may not see any benefits to your request other than wasting money. It may also backfire on you as other team members may like their monitors and now the new guy just changed it around for no reason they can ...


2

If you worked through a recruiter (either at the target company or a third party) you might be better off composing the thank-yous for your interviewers and then sending them to the recruiter to forward along. It's a little less intrusive and still 100% professional.


2

Although I primarily agree with @matthewninja answer, and think you should definitely focus on that, I would like to complement the path suggested by @Thomas Catnach, @HenryM and @gidds. If I understood correctly, gidds and HenryM basically suggested the same thing, and that by 'rubbery tips' Henry means silicone tips, which yours already is and isn't ...


2

Then bring it up with your boss. Either he is OK with giving you the promotion that you discussed and you get what you wanted, or he is NOT OK with the promotion, in which case you'd rather find out sooner instead of wasting a few years in a junior position you don't want. Bring up your concerns in a calm manner.


2

I think that you made a blunder by trusting an promise without any kind of written statements to back that up. They can simply bow out of these promises and string you along. Making promises about promotions seems extremely risky to me, since they don't even know how good you actually are. Why do I think so? My manager encourages me to "experiment" with ...


2

One of my previous jobs solved this by creating zones in the open floor plan office. For example the northernmost corner is a quiet area, where no noise is allowed, and the southernmost corner is for meetings and loud discussions. The center is for everyday work. Perhaps you could suggest something similar to your manager? With movable dividers, it shouldn'...


2

If your colleagues are sensible people they will see the problem created by you leaving is an issue with your employer and not with you. Therefore you won't need to worry about keeping a good relationship with them. Assuming you're not overestimating yourself/underestimating them. It sounds like your company has created a situation where you have a very ...


2

As you say in the question, it should be brief. It should also be professional. Generally, say who you are, what your professional background is, and then perhaps a sentence or two about you personally. Something like this: My name is Elena93 and I just moved here from Boston. I have a degree in cake decorating from Boston State, and have done ...


1

I've found that it's always best to do the ramp up in person, for all seniorities I've worked with. You being a junior means your ramp up will probably be a bit longer. If I were in the company, I'd prefer that you work on site all days at least for the first month, for this reason. I suggest you straight up offer this to the company, so they can see you're ...


1

Make the case to your boss that you need a higher resolution monitor (or three) so that you can work more efficiently. Any decent boss, once aware of that request, will talk to the rest of the team to see if they need a similar upgrade.


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