Hot answers tagged

126

I feel ashamed for not contacting them more. I don't want them to think that i'm not interested. Even though, i'm very very interested in starting the work. You're way, way over-thinking this - you don't work there (yet), and it sounds though all the hiring paperwork etc is sorted so there's nothing to do until you start. There is no reason whatsoever to ...


56

IF you do this, keep it low-key. Send an email such as: Dear Steve. Any documentation you want me to look over in preparation? Cheers, Bill. Don't say a word more than that.


24

You're not going to get documentation. Even if you signed some stuff, there's always additional NDAs and similar paperwork at the start of the job. And they aren't likely to send that to someone who isn't on corporate hardware, corporate VPNs, have an account in their system, etc. What might make sense is to ask them what technologies they use (languages, ...


20

You are currently in a very weak position: spotty work history, a 6 month unemployment stretch and 40 failed interviews. Your priority at this point should be to strengthen your resume. The best you can do is to take the job and make sure you perform well and keep it steady. It's ok to do learning on the side (with or without a scholarship) but ONLY if it ...


12

Look for a new job when you already have a job. When talking to a company that is hiring, they will ask you what you are making in your current job. If you tell them, their offer will be a function of that figure. (10% more than what you are currently making, for example.) But, if you don't tell them, you risk being perceived as uncooperative. You can ...


11

Bad idea. Don't burn your bridges until you get to them :) If you're keen to start, it sounds like you are, then see if you can leave your current job sooner and start your new one sooner. If you're bored out of your mind currently then my suggestion is to read around the subject or learn a new skill. If you're not sure where to start then by all means ask ...


9

Next time say "Sure, let me first email our boss to double check that it's OK. We might have to wait a bit before we get their confirmation though.” It could well be your coworker agrees (highly doubt it) or they will accuse you of being uncooperative and/or a snitch (most likely). Tell your coworker that you value your job position more than hurting ...


7

All this really means (to me) is that you care about your current company and the people who work there. That's not a bad thing. You have to find it within yourself to understand and come to grips with the idea that this is a professional decision. You're making it for the betterment of your career and hopefully for the betterment of your family. Once you ...


7

Congratulations on landing a brand-new job you're excited about! I'm a manager. I have in the past and in the future will continue to politely decline any such request. First of all, you don't work for me yet, so I'd be violating all kinds of rules and conventions by sharing materials with you that are internal to the company, department, or team. Secondly, ...


7

I'm looking forward to starting on x/x Do you have a public API I can get familiar with before I start? Is both low key AND not asking for private information, just a public URL. If they have a private URL they will decide if they want to give it to you and how to give you access. But don't be the one asking (security wise). This approach will also show ...


7

It really depends on the company culture. At my startup, yes. At my previous startup, no. In some places unlimited PTO is meant to be a perk for responsible employees; don't be constrained to X days and be flexible as long as you're getting stuff done. In others it's just an accounting dodge so the company doesn't have to carry the PTO balances as a ...


7

This stress and fear have taken a toll on my health but I need this internship for my school and I can't terminate the contract. Brush it off. This is just a temporary placement for a specific purpose. Not worth getting upset over. You need to make a mental shift and discount the personalities. Do the best you can and don't let people who will soon be ...


6

Go ahead and ask, nothing wrong with that. Let them know the reason and it will probably be ok. The worst they can do is say "no," but at least you'll have an answer from people who can actually give you a definitive answer.


6

Nothing wrong with what you're doing. Boasting about it may come off as arrogant or something else negative, or maybe not... there is no way of telling. What does guarantee you a positive impression is to keep it quiet and then when you do start working you have a good headstart and some of the planning already done. This will make you look very efficient ...


5

Usually significant salary increases can only be achieved by leaving one employer and joining another company, or from being promoted into a higher role. I've never had any decent salary rise staying in the same role, not matter how much work I've put in.


5

Don't work for free! "Reading documentation on the company's products" is part of working. Even when I'm interested in something work related, I read about it during work hours, because that's part of my work that I am paid to do. I don't work for free. Neither should you. If you're excited about starting work, and it is possible, you can ask to ...


5

Do not do it. More specifically, DON'T say anything to NewManager about it. If you do that work to prepare you, fantastic. But: do not commit anything and do not say anything to NewManager at this point. Maintain a professional, serious attitude. Act like a serious professional in the last days of your current role, focussing hard on that. really want to ...


4

Inform your boss as soon as possible It sounds like there is currently an informal closing procedure, which is causing problems. Moving forward, have a close check-list signed by the shift manager Create a point-by-point checklist of everything that needs to be done to close. Have every employee initial tasks they have done, and have one employee, the shift ...


4

They gave you a contract to sign. That is as much certainty as anyone can have that the job is yours. It is understandable that you are worried, but you should have faith that they are just understaffed or dealing with other more pressing tasks, and that is why you have not heard back from them yet. That said, if you have not heard by lunchtime on Friday (...


3

Compensation in most cases is rather simple. Most larger companies (at least in the US) use salary bands. These determine the market rate of a certain job description/grades and is based on actual salary survey that's done by professional clearinghouses (such as Radford). These bands are well established for both individual contributor and managers up to the ...


3

Generally speaking, you should NOT indicate that you may contact a previous supervisor of yours unless you have spoken with that supervisor, and they have given you permission. I'm guessing that when teaching in a US university, you will have a well defined supervisor, so it is possible they assume that all your previous jobs were in academia, and you had ...


3

Also somethings he tells me to do, I can't possibly believe are right Then find out what is right. In the short term, you can ask your colleague why they think you should do the thing that you're sure is wrong. If their explanation isn't convincing (and they don't outrank you) then say no, you're not going to do it. After that, approach your manager, and ...


2

"PTO policies" vary by employer – and there are actually some very-exotic legal/accounting reasons for those differences – but it basically comes down to this: "if you need time off, just ask for it and explain why." Don't feel that you cannot or should not ask, or that you run a risk by asking.


2

I would agree with the other answers: it's going to vary by company, or even by the particular part of the company where you're working. A team with more "active" problems (like customer service) might have stricter rules than a research team where being understaffed is less of an issue. You'll need to ask, and they should be able to give you an ...


2

There are a few ways. You can job search and focus on negotiating higher pay. There is no reason you cannot get more than 15%. It just depends on the market. Or you can make yourself indispensable to the point where you have the leverage at your current position to basically demand a big increase. I've had a 30% increase once without even changing roles. You ...


2

I would urge you to consider that work is work: it's something you do to make money, so, you can live. Focus on your new job. Regarding the old job, it's extremely likely that after one hour nobody will even remember your name. People come and go all the time, it means nothing. Enjoy your: life!


2

These are very normal feelings to have. With regards to guilt: it helps to understand that the the company is simply a business, and your relationship to it is strictly a business one. If it was in the business interest of the company to fire you, it would do so without any second thoughts. If it is in your business interest to quit, you should do so ...


2

I wouldn't. If you're gonna ask for more money every time your responsibilities increase then that's kinda a red flag right there, at least in-so-far as the company is concerned. Maybe taking on new responsibilities proactively will factor into their decision to give you a raises in the future but if you're going to require a pay bump as a condition of ...


2

I had been losing jobs, again and again, nothing lasting more than a few months to 1.5 years. It has been due to the fact I was not working on in-demand tech and was left behind but I had been trying to get up to speed with new tech and falling behind So it sounds like this isn't the first time you've faced this dilemma. Not working on in-demand tech might ...


2

Try repeating back to him in the proper corporate language. "I'm leaving, take over" you reply with short form: "I'll cover for you." Or long form: "You're free to step out, I'll do my job when I'm the only one here." It's on the gentle side but it's a really consistent form of correcting someone that you can do unilaterally. If ...


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