Hot answers tagged

575

Scam. They have absolutely no justification for requesting your password. Don't back away. Run! And report them to the service they contacted you through, so they can be kicked off it. And to the appropriate government offices; in the US, information about that can be found at https://www.usa.gov/stop-scams-frauds (The FTC in particular has been going ...


448

I want my manager to know my actual background and areas of expertise and feel guilty that I “stole” a position using someone else's credentials. However, I'd also like to retain my position, if possible. How can I tell my manager that I was hired by mistake? Skip the "hired by mistake" part - that's just silly. Deal with the "my manager doesn't know ...


393

So my question is, is it normal for recruitment agents to send out job offers without any details? In my experience, that is not at all normal. I've never encountered it personally, nor have I ever heard of it before. As a hiring manager, I never required anything like it from applicants. If not, what details should I expect in a proper job offer? I ...


285

Don't do it. Not by giving access, not by screen sharing, not even by describing what is inside (like what security algorithms). Your job as software developer is to create safe and secure environment for your customer (here: current employer). Not only such action violates the basics of the good code of conduct, but you will almost certainly be ...


227

You were invited for a team event and you should go unless you are not available for official or personal reasons during that time. None of the reason can be "I do not know the person". If you do not know him, this a chance for you to get to know him along with several other things about the company, culture and people.


221

There's a simple rule. If you don't have a formal offer, you don't have a job. Take another job offer without any guilt. Don't worry about what he's thinking or how it makes him feel. It's business. He'll get over it. And if he takes it personally, you wouldn't really want to work with someone like that anyway. If they wanted you badly enough (and ...


218

In some locations, it is a crime to provide certain types of false information to a potential employer. If this is the case where you are, or you are not sure, you should consider Eric Lippert's Answer. Otherwise read on: Side note: they are very professional. You should own up to the the lie, apologise, be honest about the reasons why you lied, indicate ...


209

Any company with a dress code of business attire generally wants to signal professionalism, conscientiousness, high standards, even conformity. Some people will fit in with this corporate culture and some people won't. But there are two kinds of companies that have a casual dress code. The first kind wants to signal that what you wear is literally ...


200

is it a good idea to work extra without claiming hours in order to make up for my incompetence and distractions? No. It's a horrible idea. In addition to doing all the bad things that overtime normally does to you, it will also not solve your problem. You say your problem is that due to your competence level and distraction level, you are not efficient ...


191

I suggest that instead of telling them you can't take the job you tell them the problems you're facing. Ideally, you would have some proposed solutions as well. For example, are their people all working remotely? Perhaps you could start remotely also and move there when things settle down. Is your biggest issue finding an apartment? Perhaps they have some ...


186

If your primary goal here is to avoid burning bridges, then I think this is one of the rare situations where you should probably admit you're planning to leave. Yes, you might get burned for it (ie: let go before you wanted to leave) but at least in that case, it's not you who's burning bridges. Lying when your boss already has solid reason to suspect you'...


185

Don't do it! No, it's not normal. Seeing how likely an offer is to fall through (better candidate found, bad fit, etc.) you should never put all your eggs in one basket, even if you actually had been given a full job description. Best case, the job is real and something that interests you and something you're qualified for and you actually get an offer. ...


184

What do I tell any person if they ask me how I did whatever I did? You show them what you did. Ideally, you teach them how to do it without you. When you do that, you'll build a great reputation as someone to go to for help. Rather than diluting your value to the company, you're actually increasing it. Companies value team players who help everyone get ...


173

Indeed this is a big red flag. By requiring you to join them and quit your current job first, your position to negotiate any terms in that offer letter is significantly compromised. I would recommend refusing to join them before having a signed contract in hand.


172

TL;DR - Get out, soon. Did anyone has been in this situation? A very close friend of mine. How things went by when you refused to do such kind of unethical activities? Did you get punished indirectly? Things did not turn out to be good for him, he faced lots of internal push-back next, when he refused to take part in this unethical wrongdoing. ...


171

I would like to ask for it as soon as possible, but don't know how to approach my new boss in a professional and non-awkward manner. You are seriously overthinking this one. Something like "Hey boss. I noticed that the women's bathroom doesn't have a sanitary bin. Could we get one?" would be fine. If you would find that too embarrassing to suggest in ...


171

I had someone recommend that I completely leave this job off resume and simply tell potential recruiters/interviewers that I took some time off to travel and whatnot. I think that might look better than trying to explain why i left a big insurance company after 5 months. That someone gave you bad advice. You would be better off not lying. Imagine a ...


166

One of the thresholds for stopping with a recruiter is are they honest, can they be trusted? Ask the recruiter if they understand/know what is wrong with providing code from your current employer (don't even mention about the legal implications). If they are dismissive about your question or do not see anything wrong with it, then I would recommend ...


164

It is troubling that a manager would ask a future employee to work before their start date. While I understand that a good start with the new employer is desired, it seems that a polite, but firm "No" is in order. An email reply something like the following is appropriate: Dear [future boss]: While it is flattering that you think enough of me to ...


157

Refuse Refuse to grant access to this person. You're not authorized to do that, and they aren't authorized to access the system. Asking for access to your current employer's system is immensely unethical and will endanger your current employment at best. What happens if they steal user data or secret keys? Or what if they install a back door? Or what if ...


150

A written contract for an employee is just normal. You don’t have to be afraid about asking. Don’t even make an issue from it. Don’t ask IF there will be a contract as that might really trigger some "don’t you trust me" reaction in your business partner. Better ask: WHEN he will give you the contract for you to sign, as it is the most natural thing ...


146

Everyone involved in my hiring process left the company before I started: is this a red flag? It's definitely a little weird. I've never heard of a company having an interview panel entirely composed on people on their way out especially across job functions. I would at least expect your hiring manager to be the same. Normally you don't use people in their ...


146

Please don't judge the organization based on a group email from Human Resources! They probably have a new-hire checklist they're following. They probably have a few-years-old email message they send to everybody. They, almost certainly, did not write this email and have superficial knowledge (if that) of what it contains. Plus, they mentioned "topics ...


145

A former co-worker, not a recruiter but someone who deals with a ton of email, once told me that she only scans emails for the important information because that's what they're told to do. Many recruiters are likely doing the same thing: scanning your email for a phone number and then emailing you when they can't find it rather than carefully reading it and ...


144

[....] the salary annexure and appointment letter will be issued on your joining. So, basically you're expected to accept an offer and join the work without having any written proof of appointment and confirmed agreement on your payout? Anything which is not a part of written agreement from proper authority, is not part of any agreement, at all. If I ...


143

First of all, never count future dates as part of your experience, that's a lie. You never gained the experiences from the future dates, on the date you are claiming to have the experience. You are supposed to present the existing experience, not the probable future one based on some random assumption. That said, in the current scenario, a 2-month gap ...


139

The appropriate thing to do here is to ask to be paid. They're not training you in web development (or the fashion industry), they're just using you for free labour. Look up contract web developer rates and start from there. I see comments about how you could cripple the company - use this to your advantage to get a fair deal. At this stage they have ...


137

I'm kind of worried it would make some kind of 'bad' impression in my first day. Or am I overthinking? Using crutches can happen to anyone, you should not feel bad about it. If any, I suggest you write an email or similar to your new boss, explaining to him/her about the accident and the crutches, but that you will be there at work as agreed. This way your ...


134

Good luck. You demonstrated that you would work for less money. And they will take advantage of this as long as they can. Find a job elsewhere. Dump them. Then you will get paid market rate, and so will your successor.


133

If the CEO meeting is going to happen, what questions should I ask, to make sure everything is OK with the company? Start with something like: "So I have been told that meeting with you was an unusual procedure, but that you have had bad luck with employees in the past. Can you tell me about that?" Then you see where that leads and ask follow-up ...


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