Hot answers tagged

378

So my question is, is it normal for recruitment agents to send out job offers without any details? In my experience, that is not at all normal. I've never encountered it personally, nor have I ever heard of it before. As a hiring manager, I never required anything like it from applicants. If not, what details should I expect in a proper job offer? I ...


228

You were invited for a team event and you should go unless you are not available for official or personal reasons during that time. None of the reason can be "I do not know the person". If you do not know him, this a chance for you to get to know him along with several other things about the company, culture and people.


218

In some locations, it is a crime to provide certain types of false information to a potential employer. If this is the case where you are, or you are not sure, you should consider Eric Lippert's Answer. Otherwise read on: Side note: they are very professional. You should own up to the the lie, apologise, be honest about the reasons why you lied, indicate ...


186

If your primary goal here is to avoid burning bridges, then I think this is one of the rare situations where you should probably admit you're planning to leave. Yes, you might get burned for it (ie: let go before you wanted to leave) but at least in that case, it's not you who's burning bridges. Lying when your boss already has solid reason to suspect you'...


179

Don't do it! No, it's not normal. Seeing how likely an offer is to fall through (better candidate found, bad fit, etc.) you should never put all your eggs in one basket, even if you actually had been given a full job description. Best case, the job is real and something that interests you and something you're qualified for and you actually get an offer. ...


173

TL;DR - Get out, soon. Did anyone has been in this situation? A very close friend of mine. How things went by when you refused to do such kind of unethical activities? Did you get punished indirectly? Things did not turn out to be good for him, he faced lots of internal push-back next, when he refused to take part in this unethical wrongdoing. ...


147

A former co-worker, not a recruiter but someone who deals with a ton of email, once told me that she only scans emails for the important information because that's what they're told to do. Many recruiters are likely doing the same thing: scanning your email for a phone number and then emailing you when they can't find it rather than carefully reading it and ...


145

Everyone involved in my hiring process left the company before I started: is this a red flag? It's definitely a little weird. I've never heard of a company having an interview panel entirely composed on people on their way out especially across job functions. I would at least expect your hiring manager to be the same. Normally you don't use people in their ...


145

Please don't judge the organization based on a group email from Human Resources! They probably have a new-hire checklist they're following. They probably have a few-years-old email message they send to everybody. They, almost certainly, did not write this email and have superficial knowledge (if that) of what it contains. Plus, they mentioned "topics ...


143

First of all, never count future dates as part of your experience, that's a lie. You never gained the experiences from the future dates, on the date you are claiming to have the experience. You are supposed to present the existing experience, not the probable future one based on some random assumption. That said, in the current scenario, a 2-month gap ...


137

I'm kind of worried it would make some kind of 'bad' impression in my first day. Or am I overthinking? Using crutches can happen to anyone, you should not feel bad about it. If any, I suggest you write an email or similar to your new boss, explaining to him/her about the accident and the crutches, but that you will be there at work as agreed. This way your ...


133

If the CEO meeting is going to happen, what questions should I ask, to make sure everything is OK with the company? Start with something like: "So I have been told that meeting with you was an unusual procedure, but that you have had bad luck with employees in the past. Can you tell me about that?" Then you see where that leads and ask follow-up ...


133

My main problem is this: I have no idea how to navigate the corporate world My life as a minor celebrity is over and I want to move on and work as a regular person, but this is proving to be surprisingly difficult. What can I do to remain professional and try to get people to forget my somewhat famous background? You are in an entry level job. ...


126

It's very easy to explain indeed: it's just a rounded up number. Nobody's asking you how many days, hours, and minutes you worked. For all intents and purposes 3 years 10 months is the same as 4 years. Edit: Of course, as per one of the comments below, if you're prompted for a month count, then you have to be rigorous of your current count of months ...


125

In the United States, employers are required to complete an I-9 form that verifies you have the legal authority to work. That form requires the employer to check your ID, and includes a list of acceptable IDs. (USCIS page on I-9) LISTS OF ACCEPTABLE DOCUMENTS All documents must be UNEXPIRED. Employees may present one selection from List A or a ...


124

Later that day I received a email reinforcing that he does in fact expect me to show up with my college degree. I am unsure how to handle this situation. The easiest solution for this is that you just show them your degree. If you indeed have it you have nothing to lose by showing it, and that will satisfy their requirement; everyone happy. I then ...


114

What do I do if I feel unqualified for the job but can't quit and won't get fired easily even though it's taking me a long time to do things and I end up having to do everything over and over again because my boss won't tell me exactly how to do everything and because I don't know how to do everything the way biostatisticians know how to do? There'...


111

It's a red flag in that it indicates two things: the CEO is jumpy about people leaving and a sign that people at the company aren't readily replaceable, which probably means they need an off-the-beaten-path skill set. A developer quitting during probation over the tools and frameworks sounds like he was bait-and-switched, and you've already said that the ...


111

Observing your religion shouldn't be viewed as being rude. Simply respond and explain the situation to them while thanking them for their offer. You can certainly suggest delaying for a month, and they should be happy enough to do this (other plans permitting). They may also offer to go for an evening event instead of a daytime one. They might even go ...


108

I know they are going to confirm degree with previous employer as I am a recent graduate, and they will know that I lied. Why would they do that? I'm uncertain why they would call your employer rather than the university/college? Plus why would they check your grades or gpa? I never heard of that before. Typically the background process will check the ...


107

I lied about my education to my employer and background check revealed I did not graduate. How do I respond to my employer after they send me the following? The presupposition of the question is a bad supposition. You do not respond. You're in a hole of your own digging; stop digging. You stop soliciting legal advice from strangers on the internet and get ...


107

Yes, it was unexpected and should have happened in a better way. However, you did one mistake here, you should have immediately responded to them declining to take the test (exactly the reasons what you've said in the question). However, if you still did not communicate anything after receiving the email, it's still not too late, take action as soon as ...


101

Yes, it is a red flag. That amount of turnover and the fact that none of the people who you talked to during the interview process are now still in the company is definitely beyond unusual and is certainly problematic for you. That doesn't mean you should pack up and leave. But it definitely is something to be aware of and take into account. For once, ...


97

Going anon for this answer... I think I can speak from experience. Not nearly as famous as "5-10% of the US" famous, but when I entered my current large-sized company, probably 500+ people knew me by name and face within the first week, including people from other branches and whom I'd never met. Invitations to events weekly and dining at the CEO table ...


95

In the interview, simply ask what their flexible working policy is and indicate that you've found remote working to be productive in the past. Then see what their policy/approach is and work from there. You'll probably find out here at what point you'll be allowed to work remotely (e.g. after the probation period has elapsed). You need not make a big deal ...


94

Actually convincing them is the easy part, keeping your job after the dust settles is another matter entirely. The best approaches would be: Avoid making it seem like you were making a threat or ultimatum, it would be best to ask for a pay raise BEFORE mentioning any offer Go to Salaries.com or another site that gives salaries for your industry. Have a "...


90

It's all about wording I think your comment: The information was work i was working on at the moment and I emailed it as I needed to do work on my personal laptop ; I couldn't take my work station away whilst on extended leave overseas. Goes a long way to being the right way to describe this. You were wrapped up in a project and yes you messed up but no ...


89

You need to remember that recruiters get paid a high percentage of their wages through commission. The recruiters job is to get you from just a CV, to interviewing and hopefully joining a company. 90% of the time, they are only there to try and fill a role that the prospective employer has open. If the recruiter is still in contact with you it is highly ...


89

My employer was fairly upset and during the reviewing session openly mocked my education ("they must've taught you that") and my skills ("Do you not know that? Why do we have to explain this to you") also dropping the "well then I want to see your degree!". One of my biggest pet peeves is when someone insist that you should have learned a certain topic in ...


84

Provide the reason you are unable to field phone calls. It is not necessary to be specific - vague language like: "I have a condition which (temporarily/permanently) prevents me from using a phone" or "I do not have ready access to a phone/network connection suitable for voice communication" would be sufficient. It is not necessary to invite or ...


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