New answers tagged

8

Recruiters earn their money by recruiting people. If these people are working in their current role for 1 month or 1 decade is none of their worry. Also recruiters, at least those who have crossed my path, are usually focused on the present: if you are not available now but only maybe interested later, you will end up in some sort of archive where they keep ...


-1

If this was handled this way with me, I'd have decided to leave immediately, and walked out. Regardless of the legalities of it, it's extremely unprofessional for your manager to have handled this in this way. It seems almost as though she took personal offense to the reasons you gave and tried to sit there and bicker with you about them. A good manager ...


-2

This seems like very obviously a non-issue to me. Your manager manages people who have your job. That's their job. That means they have a role in hiring, firing, evaluating, and adjusting compensation for people who have your job. That means they must be aware of the talent pool for your job, that's part of their job. You gave your information to the ...


0

Most likely recruiter, manager and company are liable for GDPR breaches. I'd suggest contacting a lawyer and refrain from talking about this subject with anyone other than your legal counsel. Make sure you keep records of the meeting, if any notes were taken, what was discussed, what PI (full name, full address, email, phone number etc) was presented in ...


-3

As I understand it: You work for a recruitment agency You contacted the same recruitment agency to apply for a new job and gave your details Your boss, that works at the same recruitment agency, sees your details I'm not a lawyer, but - I don't see how this breaks any data privacy regulations. It's not like your details were shared outside the ...


31

If you're in Europe, don't talk to HR. Talk to the Data Protection Officer. You mention the acronym PII (Personal Identifying Information) in your question, so presumably you live somewhere covered by the GDPR, right? PII is a term associated with that piece of EU regulation. If so, then I'd suggest that you refrain from talking to HR, but that you should ...


-12

Before starting any job search, you should try to communicate your concerns & needs to your current employer, and give them opportunity to accommodate you. If they can't (or won't) meet your expectations, it would be understandable to everyone involved for you to be looking for other opportunities (on your own time) while continuing to perform your work ...


2

The gist of my answer is: Find out if this is a realistic task, one you would like to do and good for your professional career. If not, look for a new job. As already suggested I would also suggest to talk to your boss first. And in a more informal way to your colleagues to get a better "assessment" about how they would feel about these changes. ...


5

You said: The trial periods lasts 6 months. During that time, both sides can cancle the contract within two weeks Most sensible thing for you, then, is ask for a trial period. Then, two weeks before the better employment starts simply give your two weeks notice. If the company will ask why are you quitting, you can give some general reason like "I don'...


5

Is it rude to decline a permanent contract and make a counter offer for a fixed-term contract? It's never rude to tell the truth. It would be rude to not tell them and just quit after a few month. However, be prepared that they won't give you a time limited contract if you aren't working a McJob (so retail, burger joint, delivery driver etc). A large part ...


7

It's not necessarily rude, but it is unusual. Companies usually aren't very flexible about this parameter. They have something specific in mind. If they offered a permanent contract, they want someone who will be there for the long term. But, you never know until you ask. You could phrase it something like, "Thank you for your offer. Unfortunately ...


0

How badly do you need the job? If you can get another suitable job within a tolerable amount of time, then realize you have the power. And to answer your question, no, it is not reasonable to expect you to travel both ways on your dime. In the USA, this would normally mean you'd be reimbursed "for mileage" which includes fuel and wear-and-tear on ...


3

Nathan, I have been working in Russia and the US. In both countries the employer is interested in using you for less money. You sell your time, your life and health. Employer gets your time, ideas, sweat and tear in exchange for money. You must establish personal boundries and requesting coverage for commute time is one of the basic things. Don't be afraid ...


2

You can totally say no. However, people do remember who is flexible and who is not and use that knowledge when filling higher up positions that require flexibility. So, you can do whatever you want, but it can hurt your career.


0

You're not being unreasonable, but you'll want to be looking for a new job as soon as possible. From your perspective, this company has a culture and expectations that you don't care for; why would you work there? From your employer's perspective, they got work to do and need people with a certain work ethic; why would they want to keep you around?


5

I agree with much of what's already been said. This answer is about proposing a compromise that can work well in some situations. The mode of transport is important, as is the nature of the work. If there's a fast train, and you can work on the train, then everyone should be happy with you doing the majority of the journey during normal working hours, ...


15

I think if they require you to work off-site, you can ask them if they can provide accommodation for you for that 2 months, eg. book a hotel room or Airbnb. My example: I work in the UK, and from time to time I'm being asked to support sites in other cities in the country, and the other company books me a hotel and car/transport ticket (if the site is more ...


55

No, you are not being unreasonable for not wanting to have that extra commute imposed on you. You were hired to work on Office A from X hour to Y. What should happen is that you go to work at Office A at X. Then, if they want you to be on Office B you would travel there during your work hours, and travel back from there so you can check out of local office ...


113

Ask for the commute to be part of your working hours or ask for overtime pay.


3

As a prelude to my answer, I'd like to point to @HenryM's comment, who I agree was onto something there: Why do you want more recognition? What is your goal beyond that - because I'm guessing you have some long term reason [...]? I think that would help myself and others give a better answer.... if so. In line with that, allow me to offer how I read the ...


3

Difference in expectations This looks like classical example of difference in expectations in a (business) relation, between you and the company (represented by manager) . What does company wants ? They need someone to fill in and do extra shift when someone else can't or won't. And that someone is often you. They do not expect from you to work for free, ...


3

I think the general answer would be to have a one on one meeting with your manager to discuss what you each think is going well and what can be improved with your work. You could then mention teamwork being an area you see yourself doing well in part because of taking the extra shifts. (I don't know if regular one on one meetings are a thing where you work ...


0

I hate to break it to you, but from a manager's point of view, there is no emotional component to shift assignments. There is a limited amount of work available, and that is because there is a limited amount of pay available. The basic employment agreement is "I have something I need to be done and I'm willing to pay you to do it." No one person ...


6

I think (lightheartedly) that posting on an internet question answer site to let others respond to your extra shifts is the perfect solution. This is free and easy and this answer and the comments prove that it works. Now on to some hopefully better advice. You stated that you are already receiving the recognition of additional pay from the company. If you ...


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