New answers tagged

12

Yes, they would have to pay you in almost all developed countries in the world. You've essentially left (very early) during your probationary period, so the company would have to pay you in full for all the days you have worked thus far, and then terminate your employment contract.


7

'M' is worried, and he should be as you are going to be in a position of authority over him! Here are a few ideas:- Early on in the new job I would share some of your experiences with M with your new boss and indicate that he might be an issue that needs resolved. Make sure you keep a good record of all interaction going forward and when you start the new ...


2

Didn't happen to get anything from him in an email, did you? Without something in writing threatening you, not much you can do. Complaining to the CEO without something more than your word against his will likely be turned around on you. You'll just have to manage him. Play politics, and watch yourself around him. Don't give him a reason to find ...


3

Since I would have 4 weeks to starting the job, what are some good ways to stay in touch with the new employer ? Do I need to do any followup at in the 4 week duration ? There's usually no need for followup. If travelling, it's probably a good idea to let your new employer know that you won't be around the next 4 weeks, and give them the best way to ...


0

Staying in touch is not as important as being available to answer questions or fill out any additional forms that they forgot to tell you about. Hopefully you still have access to email. And hopefully you have a trusted person that has access to your snail mail and personal papers. HR might want a copy of your degree, your passport, or who knows what. In ...


0

Sometimes I've had lunch with future co-workers. I went on a bike ride once. Don't be a pest. Don't try to "start working". Enjoy some time off if you have it.


0

Depends on the job. For instance, I'm moving from an IT job into a ministry job. I accepted a call a couple months ago, and I'm FINALLY moving this weekend. I have been in contact virtually every weekend since, and have traveled there since to set things up. But my situation is perhaps different. I will be assuming leadership of an organization, and ...


6

You've got the job - the "sales phase" is over. The employer probably doesn't need or want any follow up beyond potential on-boarding paperwork - which they'll give you directions for, as needed. There really isn't anything you need to do, other than stay attentive if they reach out and ask for anything. When I switch jobs, I take the time to make sure I'm ...


0

I wouldn’t do anything until you have a job offer in writing. You do not want to tell your manager you almost have another job. If a job offer comes your way then you have a decision to make. You will have to weigh the pluses and minuses of each position. I can’t help on which way to go. You have no control over when a job offer comes your way. Don’...


7

Since this is Indian context, you should read your joining letter very carefully from the MNC you have already joined - it will contain clauses as to what you can and can not do with respect to prematurely ending your employment. Many companies keep a seven day notice period during the first three months (of probation) - if you have that, use it to tell ...


2

It you want to leave your job after a day - frankly that's your choice. Good on you for being so honest with yourself and putting your professional needs first. Check your contract with MNC co. with a fine tooth comb check your probation notice period. I'm not going to reiterate the excellent advice given to you from the Indian commentators Also get in ...


3

You are one day in to your job and you want to leave. Of course the MNC can't do a lot about it, except word will go around amongst their network that your loyalty is pretty weak if a better offer comes along. You will hurt your chances of working for the MNC in future, and likely other companies too. However, what do you hope to gain by simply walking ...


13

This answer is written keeping your current context in mind and my experience working in India. What I want to know is if I abscond this organisation, would they be able to take any serious actions? I am assuming you have already completed the paperwork and signed the offer letter and any other papers. So, absconding is never a good idea. It could be ...


1

It is not only all right, it's a tool to analyze a potential employer's worth regarding how they value their employees. Depending on the interviewing stage, there are different ways to tackle this. When the question is asked before a technical interview It will commonly be asked by HR, basically doing a radar sweep of the candidates to see where they ...


-1

I understand that you do not wish to disclose your reasons to us, please don't take this answer as insistence on that. If your condition is not absolutely unique (and with over 7 billion people on Earth it most likely isn't), then talking to other people with that limitation and how they dealt with it could be a good idea. Phone calls for interviews are ...


2

If you think you're being productive but your manager doesn't, you probably don't understand his priorities, or are missing something he thinks is important. It's also possible that he's not noticing the things you have done if it wasn't the one thing he wanted done. Use these meetings to find out what he expects you to do today. Then at the next meeting ...


-7

When they email to arrange a call ask for their physical address as a scam check. Turn up in person at 9am saying you "were in the area".


7

It might help to phrase things as follows: I regret that I am not reachable by telephone, however I would be happy to travel to answer any questions you may have in person. First, you present the issue with phone calls as part of your situation. If you say that you are "unavailable" for a phone interview, many people will think "well, make yourself ...


0

Just offer to buy coffee / tea / lunch to discuss it. You don't even need to mention phone limitations. Who would turn down a free meal? Plus it shows that you are assertive and seriously interested. Or even just drop by their office (if they have one) on your own time. Remember, recruiters make money off of placing jobs. They will work with you if ...


1

"Are you available for me to call you?" How do I communicate that I cannot undertake that part of their preferred process, and I would gladly enter into an alternative? Just offer the alternative. And acknowledge that you are asking for a deviation. I'm sorry for the inconvenience, but as I mentioned, I'm not available for phone calls (nor ...


18

Employment is a market. Your potential employer is trying to get a sense of what level of compensation you are willing to accept. They do value you as a contributor of great work, but also want to pay a low price - so long as the price is fair. Give an expectation as your answer to questions about past income: “I don’t have a current salary to quote, but I ...


5

Yes, it is OK not to mention your current salary directly. Also, it's advisable that do not mention a direct figure for your expected salary either, instead engage in a communication / discussion where you can get to know how much the company is willing to offer you for that particular position / role. Check this other answer which details why the first one ...


1

How would I approach the resignation and what reason should I give, noting that my current job can easily find out that I left for the original competing company? I don't know if this will be considered unethical? This is only my second time joining a new company. There is no such thing as 'professional ethics' when it comes to choices concerning your ...


83

Provide the reason you are unable to field phone calls. It is not necessary to be specific - vague language like: "I have a condition which (temporarily/permanently) prevents me from using a phone" or "I do not have ready access to a phone/network connection suitable for voice communication" would be sufficient. It is not necessary to invite or ...


62

I think that being unable to take a phone call is going to be so unusual to a recruiter (or a prospective employer) that unless you can give a good reason they'll just perceive you as "awkward" and pass over your application. The best reason is usually the truth, e.g. My location has no cell/data coverage and I only have limited web access. I can call ...


145

A former co-worker, not a recruiter but someone who deals with a ton of email, once told me that she only scans emails for the important information because that's what they're told to do. Many recruiters are likely doing the same thing: scanning your email for a phone number and then emailing you when they can't find it rather than carefully reading it and ...


63

If you have a medical condition that prevents you from using a phone, you should be upfront about the restriction. You don’t need to clarify what the specific condition is, but you should include the limitation clearly in your cover letters. You should also disclose the preference for email as early as possible in discussions with recruiters (e.g., in an ...


27

Please note that eliminating the possibility of a phone call will cause some recruiters to refuse to work with you and will cause all sorts of problems with others that would make them less helpful for you. That being said, if you want to communicate your no phone policy then you need to do so in your initial communication and do so definitively. Say ...


10

You have two main concerns, it seems: Not burning any bridges. Not violating any ethical constraints. So here ya go: First off, don't violate any legal or contractual obligations. You didn't give a location, so we can't say if those exist for you. If you're in the United States and didn't sign a contract guaranteeing you'd work for X weeks, then you're ...


3

Are you available for me to call you? Simply answer it politely. You don't need to give any specific justifications, just need to put your request clearly. Sorry, I won't be able to take any phone calls. Please communicate over email and I'll make sure to respond promptly. I prefer email over phone as it makes the communication un-rushed/convenient and ...


49

You left a comment saying: I don't know... he can see all my progress on our Kanban board. I have never been told why we're having these meetings. So instead of jumping to conclusions about being targeted, ask. This is a chance for you to show your competence and initiative by getting a better understanding of what your managers are trying to accomplish....


2

There are two things that an employer is interested in: Can you start on the contractually agreed date? (Basically, can you keep your current contract) Did you fulfill all your contractual duties to your old employer? (Basically, did you keep your old contract, because if not, it might become a pattern) It seems you did both. You can start at the ...


63

TLDR: Adjust your attitude, use the meetings to your benefit. The meeting basically sounds similar to a daily standup. Those are commonly done in Agile development processes in addition to Jira boards, as personal information can be far more detailed, filtered and allow for better feedback/questions than a board could. So such a meeting can well make sense. ...


15

daily meetings with himself and his manager This makes things a lot easier for you. Just be really complient about anything your manager asks, but at the same time point out that he should/could already know it without the meeting. Bring your laptop to the meeting and project the kanban board. (Or if you don't have a laptop ask the manager if he can ...


3

And you're sure these aren't regular "stand up" meetings? (They don't sound like it, if it's just you and 2 managers). Create a Jira task for "daily update meeting" and log work (time) against it. If it gets moved, log the additional time in between if its insufficient for you to get anything meaningful done. What you're looking to achieve is to document ...


3

Take control of the meetings. If he can't lead these meetings in an efficient and productive manner, then you have to. On the next Monday (or first meeting of the week), go through your Jira list as normal and as efficiently as possible. Then directly move into your workload for the rest of the week, telling him what work items you have and how long they ...


2

And now I want to join them for financial reasons and leave my current job during the probation period. Seems you have your reasons and already made up your mind. I'd not going to say it's unethical, but somewhat unprofessional. You used the completing offer to negotiate a higher salary (to your satisfaction, I believe), and in two week's time, now you have ...


31

For reasons, you can say something like Pursuing other career prospects outside of the company which is closer to my needs. You should not have to explain anything more. Would it be considered unethical? The fact that you are leaving during probation or you are quitting to go to a competitor may not be considered as unethical. However, you using ...


51

Depending on your location, the probation period may work both ways, in which case it would be well within your rights to make use of it and leave your current employment for greener pastures (and twice the salary is indeed greener). You'll always have the option to resign according to the terms of your contract or local laws. Employers often like to use ...


4

Will my new company's HR department care that I gave them the wrong duration of the notice period? What can I tell them if they question me about it? That is an easy "problem": it is not a problem at all. What happens between you and the current (former) employer is not the business of the new employer - especially that the relationship will not affect the ...


0

It is often done at the executive level. However, people usually understand it as part of the job. Come in, turn the company (or department) around, and then be replaced, with some nice package. The reason for it is that changing something will bruise people's ego and the person making large changes will often make too many enemies, or accumulate too much ...


2

Is there anything I could do to prevent this from happening in the future? Your best shot is to do research on the company and their leaders and weave in some relevant questions into the interview. Examples are "when do you use consultants and when do you prefer permanent employees?", "what is your current employee turnover rate?", "how long people ...


0

No - a reasonable firm will not hire you as a permanent employee with the intention of letting you go unknowingly. The scheme you describe likely isn't the case. There are much better alternatives to hiring and firing - in terms of cost, morale, and reputation - for short-term work. The total cost savings you suggest your employer may have realized is ...


4

Sharing your exact age is up to you, but I would keep it private. Sharing that you're 22 could seem a bit cavalier early in your tenure. Things you can do while you settle in to the role: 1. Focus on demonstrating your capabilities. If you're smart and do good work, your colleagues will notice and quickly respect your opinion and leadership. 2. Get ...


3

Should I avoid revealing my age at a new role? At your age, it isn't a big deal to reveal your age if you so choose. However, as you get older, you will find out about this thing called age discrimination. There is no magic number for this, but in my experience it started happening when I was in my early 40's. Employers typically want young workers like ...


14

There's no need to hide it, or to be upfront about it when not asked. If asked, you should be honest, however (since people can find out anyway). If questioned, just state that you started early and worked hard to get where you are now.


7

Resigning during the event is not a good option. Not only is your boss likely busy with other things, but in many cases there will be some formalities involved, if only writing a letter to HR. Do notice that a "2 weeks notice" is a minimum notice period. If you plan to leave 2 weeks after the company event, you can tell HR/your boss a week before the event ...


1

Resign before the team building event (this way it would show that you are firm on your decision) and attend the event gracefully. Resigning after the event will just buy you time for the inevitable. Negotiating a later start date depends how early the company wants to fill the position, the workload on the team and other factors.


8

There will never be a right moment to resign. No company is ever happy to see someone leave. (Well, unless you're very bad at your job) Once/if you have a signed offer, it's definitely better to resign before the team building event. But don't preemptively quit. Quitting right after the event might be awkward, but do it politely and professionally and you ...


0

From my experience, it may mean you may not be "marketing" or selling your or your department's work enough for stakeholders to recognize the value. I am going to use my experience in cybersecurity to illustrate. There are certain positions that are revenue generating and other positions that are often seen as cost silos, particularly to outsiders who may ...


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