New answers tagged

10

I'd talk to your manager. One possibility is that this co-worker has been instructed, by your manager, to be your mentor (the fact that you used the tag "new-job" makes me think this). In this scenario one of two possibilities exist: You're misperceiving his attempts to mentor you as him trying to boss you around He's just a terrible mentor In ...


0

Do something meaningful with, for and in your life. Don't understand your value as a subordinate of the economic world. If you stay 5 years in an unmeaningful position, you will just be 5 years older and things will not be easier then. You might become full of boredom and resentment with lesser opportunities at your hands.


0

I do agree that technically you're not doing anything wrong by applying to multiple positions. However what I get from your question is that you're worried you fail one job interview, and that same recruiter inform the others that you failed and they decide not to pursue it any further. No way for us to know for sure but it is possible that if the interview ...


1

Programming is a craft. You need to learn this early. What you are doing is education, and for programming, it is a required first step. What you need to be employed is skill. Skill is the ability to avoid mistakes and produce good products. To develop skill, there is only one path: practice. So to "get into" programming, learn and practice. I ...


1

The recruiters are not likely to speak to each other, but of course it can happen. It is not a bad thing to do, but make sure to mention it when they ask if you have other ongoing applications. Being secretive about this will turn out bad, and there is no reason to. Just make sure you are honest/consistent in what you tell them during the different ...


3

Unless you know for sure that these jobs are for same positions from the same (geographically distributed) team - it's ok to apply for multiple positions. Based on your preference and their acceptance, you can choose any one, if you land on multiple offers. Usually the pay-scale can vary based on location - so I do not see any downside for these applications....


-1

As Joe says, find a job that doesn't require overtime. It may even be the company that you are working for. Once you decided for yourself that you are willing to leave this company and work somewhere else, and once you have found that there are other jobs around, lots of pressure is gone from you and you are in a much better position. You can for example ...


8

Other than changing job and finding a larger company with fixed hours, here are some questions you should address first. Are you really being forced? - Always remember that you can hand in your notice at any time. It's easy to forget this and feel trapped. Has your employer said you need to do overtime, or are you choosing to do it? I say this because I ...


8

I really enjoy my work, but I dont like to sacrifice/waste my free time. How do I handle it? Find a job that doesn't require overtime. That likely means avoiding startups.


1

He only does not like it, for reasons only known to him. The next time this happens, follow up your conversation with an instant message or an email that says: "I know you want me to change the code in my latest commit and I'm willing to make any change you want, but before I can change anything, I need to know the reasons why. If I don't understand ...


5

You have 8 (or whatever it is in your company) hours a day to get work done. If he comes up with changes that you need to do, this uses up some of these hours and therefore uses up the company's time. This is the mentality you need to carry with you: The company is paying you for your time and therefore a waste of your time is a waste of their time. So you ...


15

You need to get some one else in to mediate - the project lead, the boss (if that's not the same person), or another senior person. There are many reasons for rejecting working code in a code review, varying between The code is horrid and unreadable by anyone but its writer, and I wouldn't have coded it like that, so you should change your code to match the ...


47

Overall, the picture you've painted in your question, and I'll preface my answer with this, is of someone who is a relatively inexperienced developer who is new to a company and learning the ropes but having some trouble. So I'll start there and give you some advice: Regarding the experienced developer telling you to do things that "don't work": I'...


78

Also very often, he forces me to complete a section of the work even though I have to overtime. He threatens to complain to my boss Pre-empt him and talk to your boss about your issues with him. Don't wait until you're stuck in a meeting with your boss in a defensive position you're not prepared for. You can move forwards from the results of that meeting. ...


27

While I definitely agree with Hilmar that it is optional to send a reply, I would advise you to do it regardless of a reaction from others. Thank your manager for the introduction, and since they already mentioned some of your background this is a hook you could use to highlight something, or mention something about your personal life if you want. I'd do ...


59

It's optional. No need to worry about it. If you already have a company e-mail account, you can wait a few days to see if some responses come in. Often it's something like "congrats" or "welcome to the team" or "great to have you". If that's the case a simple, "Thanks for the warm welcome, I'm excited to be working with you ...


0

Alternatively, if you don't want to pay a lawyer (and who does?), practice reading legalese. It's essentially a dialect of English (or whatever your language is), but uses pointlessly stilted language that's supposed to make things more precise, but rarely does. For the most part, if you're prepared to sit down and read it slowly, it should begin to make ...


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