New answers tagged

-1

Companies that adopt the agency model of working tend to be less concerned with code quality and more interested in delivering projects faster out of the door. Their usual lack of interest in quality leads to sub-par coding standards. You may end up absorbing, or more probably, you will not be exposed to modern coding approaches and standards, particularly ...


-1

Here is another point: you must be realistic. rubbish company culture, lots of legacy projects with 90's tech, records developers work hours to charge the clients, regular meetings wasting developers' time, company does not value their staff, no agile, bad team leader, ordinary colleagues. I hate to tell you, but this is more the norm in possibly like 80% ...


2

I might be offered the 3rd job from a design agency. I do not know anything about their company culture. Here's the issue. You need to learn about their company culture in order to make an informed decision, if you want to find a job where you can stick around more than a year or six months. Ask the hiring manager about what it's like to work there. Ask if ...


4

However, due to some reasons, I have to push it back a week. It'll depend on the reason. Don't just say, "due to reasons" - actually add details about the reason. Explain the circumstances and why this was not known when you negotiated your start date. They might say yes! Especially considering that you could have simply asked for the date to ...


0

Is it possible/frowned upon now that my signed contract already has a start date set? It's always possible to ask. If they will like it or not will depend on how this company takes it, so we can't guess that. However, unforeseen situations can happen in any context, so it is understandable that a situation could have come up that changes things. My ...


3

@Zuck, I would cut your manager some slack at this stage. When you refer to him discussing your ideas with the head, you have to understand that it is not necessarily his role to originate ideas, but to gather, select, develop, and communicate good ideas that originate in the milieu of his team. That is, it is not simply your idea that has been presented, ...


12

I'd like to give you a gentle frame challenge. As you say, this is your first job. You have heard about toxic managers, and you think you've spotted one. What you don't know is just how toxic some managers can be. (Take a look through the manager tag to see some of the things people are dealing with.) This manager sounds pretty normal to me. To take it point ...


3

You might not be doing anything wrong. From 2008 to 2013, I couldn't find much work and ran through a lot of savings. It helps to broaden your search. When companies are not hiring, they are bringing in freelancers and temporary workers. You might want to talk to contract houses as they might have opportunities you can't find. You might try bidding on jobs ...


6

You have relevant skills, the problem is nobody is hiring at the moment. With the global pandemic causing recessions and anticipated economic shocks from events like brexit and the US presidential elections companies are putting off taking on new staff at the moment. Depending on where you are these issues be lessened in the next few months or they could get ...


8

There may be a need to use your own judgement in each circumstance. Slavishly following the rules is considered a form of industrial action, because bosses are rarely able to state comprehensively how every possible situation should be properly handled. Also, some of the contradictions between what supervisors say, may be less an expression of "the ...


5

Your example 1 is nothing about conflicting information: it's about doing your job. The customer wants that item, you get it for them. It doesn't matter if the security guard asked/told you to do it, what they're expressing is the need of the customer. For the rest of the examples, ask for clarification from your manager at an appropriate time. Explain you'...


3

If at all possible ask in person or in some face-to-face way. You'll want to develop a human connection with this person and that is best done without email. There are a number of ways to approach getting help. One way is to do some work (or at least get started on it) and then ask this person to take a look at it with you and give you some advice or their ...


6

Why not just ask him? Compose an email with all your actual questions. If there's something you've tried to solve the problem or learn about it yourself, include that. A senior is there to mentor junior developers as well as take on their backlog. It's terrific that you want to respect his time, and if you come prepared with questions, ready to learn he's ...


6

How do I and should I inform Company A about it? If so, then how can I leverage this to my advantage? My answer will be a bit different from the answers I usually give. If timing is on your side, and you will eventually have both offers in hand. Then just decide on one and inform both companies of your choice (accept the one you decide, and politely ...


2

I find the way you present it surprising. Nowadays, requiring a quarantine period (or at least a negative PCR test) for people coming from a different country where there is risk they could have COVID seems the rational thing to do, for all countries. The actual implementation could vary from being enforced by having military personnel watch that interned ...


3

While this may not be a legally mandated quarantine imposed by local or national laws, a company is generally allowed to enforce whatever "rules" of employment they wish so long as they are legal. Forcing an employee to self-quarantine seems to me falls under the "These are our rules of employment" purview. If your friend deems this as an ...


2

However, the company informed him he has to follow a strict quarantine, (supposedly) as part of an agreement with the local government in order to provide working visas to new employees. I think you answered yourself here: Yes they can as it is an agreement with the local government and their laws. If the company has some sort of agreement with the ...


-2

"You've got my best professional efforts – eight hours a day, five days a week."


10

The answer is for 1st world countries with well established human rights record. For other countries please seek the other answers (seems like a good candidate for canonical). Therefore my question: could an international company enforce a realistic and mandatory quarantine period on their employees? Directly? No. The company has very little say in what ...


0

As others have noted, it varies. This is essentially a one-example mini case study. Still hopefully useful. I had a manager who appreciated my abilities. He assigned me projects which well exceeded my ability to meet in a reasonable time. I provided him with a list of work I had been assigned in what I perceived to be priority order, with my estimates of ...


8

Low Risk, But Low Upside Generally, you won't be at risk of being fired if you hold yourself to 40 hours, as long as you are meeting the job expectations within those hours. As has been noted elsewhere, working more than 40 has drastically diminished returns, so if you are unable to meet the basic work requirements in 40 hours, you probably could not meet ...


4

As a midway point between the two extremes, it is very normal in pretty much every job that you might have a temporary "rush" requiring overtime. This is particularly true in anything which has a defined release date or deadline for delivery. In a large organisation this might only be an internal deadline, but it still may be important so that ...


78

I currently work in a company that has a workaholic culture. I'm only asking if it's unrealistic to try to have a work-life balance with a workaholic team once you're already in the door. And if it's unrealistic, to what extent? No, it is not unrealistic. For the most part I am able to restrict work time to 40 hours per week, give or take a few hours. On ...


14

If this team turns out to be a workaholic team, would I be risking my new job if I hold my ground and only work 40 hours a week instead of 50+? Perhaps. I haven't worked in many companies that had an "only work 40 hours" culture. In those companies where everyone worked extra, someone who chose to strictly work only 40 hours wouldn't fit in, and ...


41

The problem with working 50-60 hour weeks is that it is ineffective. Not just inefficient, but so inefficient (because you get tired, make mistakes etc. ) that you achieve less than in a 40 hour week, at least in the medium or long term. If you have nerves of steel, then you can start in a "workaholic" environment, stand your ground not staying in ...


12

Having worked in this industry for (koff, koff ...) decades, my position on such things is simple: "I'll give you my best efforts during ordinary working hours, but the rest of my life is mine." I found this out the hard way. (Long story.) "Quantity," whether we're talking about working-hours or anything else, "is not Quality." ...


0

One other thing to consider: "under American law, your manager is rather-strictly constrained with regard to what (s)he can say you you, while the opposite is not true." Not only is it true that "your manager cannot read your mind," but your manager might be unable(!) to discuss with you something that (s)he can plainly see ... unless ...


0

🤷‍♂️ "Well, do you or don't you?" Face it ... "not every job 'works.'" Because, at the end of the day, it is a human, social interaction. None of us are automatons. "If it's working, make it work." And, if it's not ... "okay..." 🤷‍♂️ Because it's called: "Business!"


0

Ok - cheese first - and now just say I LOVE, I LOVE, I REALLY LOVE THE JOB!!!!!. While the employer does care if you are happy or not at work, the usual solution is simply to dismiss a person that does not look happy enough. Trying to address some problems, even if you think they can be somehow differently solved, may cost you a job. This must be somehow ...


1

Honestly the best approach here is just to say "it's great thanks for asking". There is 0 benefit in saying how you really feel about this job. Having worked in retail they don't care if you like the job or not most managers will know that you don't like working there as very very few people actually enjoy working in retail. You might be thinking ...


0

If you would like to convey the message that you are not very satisfied with your job, a short, standard positive answer may be suitable, as opposed to an enthusiastic positive one with specific points to support it. Of course, many people that are really satisfied with their job may give a short, standard answer, but few people would fake an enthusiastic ...


8

Make a true, positive statement, something like, "I'm grateful to have this job, they're not easy to find" or find something positive to say about the job, even if overall you don't like it.


7

I used to work retail, so I understand how grating it can be to get this kind of question repeatedly when the truth is something you shouldn't say. If you don't want to lie, then you can say something like this: It can be tough, but I'm getting the hang of it I'm happy to have any job right now I can't complain If there's something specific you do like, ...


10

Out loud: "I'm liking the job." Inside: "I'm liking the fact that I get paid every week and I don't care enough about any of it to give a rat's ass." You're not being dishonest in the slightest.


89

I think there is asking, and then there's asking. As a person in a new job myself at the moment, I find there are two styles of this question. People who have little to no investment in whether you are happy or not - they are just asking to have something nice to ask. Proper response - "It's fine". I don't think you need to fake actual joy. I ...


1

From a manager point of view: telling your manager you dislike your job can be separated in two categories: You are trusted to be worth trying to change things and the management will try to make you happier (if they can) but it will be on the long term They don't believe you are worth trying (because you're still a new hire or because you're not good at ...


169

If it's just an interim job, then always reply positively. There is no plus side to whining and you already have one foot out the door. All you want is to get through this with a revenue stream as smoothly as possible.


9

Maybe you should read Dale Carnegie. Rule 1: If you have to go to work, you might as well enjoy it. Rule 2: If you tell yourself and others that you enjoy it, you will actually after some time start enjoying it.


17

When your manager asks you about how you like your job, then that's a great opportunity to point out issues in your work environment. Saying everything is great when things aren't won't lead to any improvement. Many workplaces suffer from organizational blindness to a certain degree. People found ways to arrange themselves with glaring problems in their ...


28

Since I'm still relatively new, I get asked the question often "how are you liking the job?". Should I just say I like it even though it's not true? Honesty is great but like all principles usually comes with a price tag. In this case the price tag for admitting that you are unhappy can put your employment in jeopardy. If you decide to be honest ...


0

Do not engage politics in the chat. You will not gain, and you will lose productivity to it. Demonstrate you are a nice, reliable person for a while— months at least. When you get back into the workplace, if you do, and after you've built up a rapport with them, engage your coworkers in conversation 1:1. Be respectful and courteous. Don't outright put down ...


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