New answers tagged

2

This will be one short duration job after a two year stint in your first job. You are not labeled a job hopper because you are leaving this job. That label happens when you have several of these short stint entries on your job history. You have an opportunity with this current crisis to be able to say to a future employer, that you were not happy with the ...


2

I personally wouldn't worry about someone who has one short-term role in their history. You come to the interview, you say "it wasn't a good fit, what I'm really looking for in my next role is X and Y" (remember not to be directly negative about your current employer) and that's not going to set too many alarm bells ringing. If you've got two short term ...


0

Assuming you want to change industries as your question implies, you're not doomed. But you cannot start at the same level without personal connections of some kind who believe in you. My advice is to discreetly ask around your network, you should have quite a varied and large professional network considering your role. See what exactly is available and ...


4

Would it be reasonable to ask for a pay increase? Very reasonable. It's fairly common to pay more for evening or overnight shifts when a job would typically be daytime. Another thing is I would appreciate to get paid more frequently. Would it be fair to request this or is this too unrelated? It's fair to ask anything. It's unlikely they will change ...


21

So, the job is really a perfect fit for me. But the low salary really started to nag on me. How can I get a higher salary without loosing the job opportunity? If the salary isn't what you need/want, then the job isn't a perfect fit. Wait until the end of your current contract. Then, if an extension is offered, indicate the salary you require in order ...


5

You don't mention where in the world your colleague is working, although I'm assuming from the mention of Fortune 500 that it's probably in the US. Nevertheless, I'll offer the Australian perspective. Profanity is part of the Australian culture, including its professional culture. It's not unusual for s**t, f**k (and derivatives) and c**t to be used ...


-4

Every time I hear someone seemingly misuse God's name (irrespective of being intentionally or not), I will say "Praise to You Lord Jesus Christ" under my breath. If it is seemingly done on purpose, done to shock (i.e. with seemingly bad or worse intent), or some other seemingly big situation, and/or loudly in public, I will sometimes say it out loud so the ...


4

I'm not sure if your friend is ethically justified in joining a group and changing its culture to suit their taste. Why should their subjective sensibilities take priority over those of the majority where there are conflicts? Yes, some compromise is to be expected with certain norms, but swear words are, frankly, most likely harmless to the people in this ...


2

I assume that swearing is used in general terms, not insulting anyone in the company, and especially not insulting you. (I have even seen cases where people who get on with each other very well often exchange insults - that's Ok if both sides agree with that and laugh about it.) If swearing is used against you, that's unacceptable but that would be another ...


80

Proceed with caution Many answers here have said "sure, go ahead and say something, just don't be judgey". I want to emphasize that anything you say could be interpreted as being judgmental even if it's not meant that way. Consider, for one thing, that some fraction of the colleagues may feel that they are being "edgy" or "transgressive" in some sense ...


6

Is it acceptable? Yes. Is it justified? Debatable. Is it a good idea? Not hardly. Swearing may be seen as inappropriate, but it is acceptable. Inappropriate behavior takes place every day, from disrespecting a colleagues time to taking undue credit for others work. You could speak with your manager or colleagues, and they'll most likely change their ...


2

This is a tricky situation. You have a non-trivial conflict here. Excessive swearing is inappropriate in a professional setting. It should stop. For better or for worse, it's part of the current culture, and changing culture needs to be done delicately or you'll end up with hard feelings and blaming. Step 1: Do your research Try to understand how it got ...


9

Is it acceptable for her to politely mention to her new colleagues that she feels uncomfortable with hearing swearing? In a good team, everyone should be comfortable bringing up what makes them feel uncomfortable. However, I also read this post which was from coworkers who were annoyed that their new colleague was trying to change the culture. The ...


15

I think she can wait for some time and keep her own good use of vocabulary. After a while people will learn about her decorum and then she can start with her endeavor to bring positive change.


-2

Is it acceptable for her to politely mention to her new colleagues that she feels uncomfortable with hearing swearing? Will this impact the likehood that she'll get hired after the official internship period is over? Yes, she absolutely should mention it. But it's extremely important to not turn this into a crusade, or some sort of personal vendetta, ...


7

Is it acceptable for her to politely mention to her new colleagues that she feels uncomfortable with hearing swearing? Certainly. It shouldn't ever be a problem to politely bring up that a certain behavior is making you uncomfortable. Doesn't mean the other side is going to do anything about it, but at least they'll be aware. It's possible that these people ...


0

It depends on the contract you have with your employer. If you have an agreement that you will not work for anyone else even after your work hours then it definitely is unethical. But if you have no such agreement after work hours you are free to work for anyone else except the competitor of your primary employer. In the 2nd case its still better to let ...


0

My new boss has given me an idea of a project that doesn’t require a lot of tribal knowledge that he’d like me to work on until they figure things out. Interestingly enough, it dovetails perfectly with something I was already working on for Company A, so I’ve already done most of the leg work for it, and all I’d need to do is adapt it to Company B’s ...


0

I'm not going to repeat Torsten's excellent advice. But never let anyone dissuade you from writing a good contract. The person you're negotiating could simply disappear overnight. It could be them getting promoted/pushed out/bought out. It could be them winning the lotto. Or it could be them getting hit by a bus. Whatever it is, it is not a sign of ...


5

I’m pretty sure I can do both jobs simultaneously without mentally short-changing one or the other. But I’m not sure this is ethical to get paid for two jobs concurrently. It seems like one company or the other should “own” my time for those hours. On the other hand, freelancers do this all the time and it’s not unethical at all as long as the ...


4

Is it morally unethical to work two jobs concurrently? No. Probably not. As long as the two companies are not competitors of each other. However, realize that you are on the clock with Company A and they are paying you to their work... which will bring me to my next point. Is it corporately unethical to work two jobs concurrently? Yes. It can be seen as ...


13

On the other hand, freelancers do this all the time and it’s not unethical at all as long as the price is known and agreed upon by both parties beforehand. If you mean billing one client for time while you're actually performing work for another client, then no, this doesn't happen all the time. If I'm billing a client for my time then I'm performing ...


3

Learning the theory is far more valuable to you. If the project is cancelled in two months, you'll have some useful experience to take to the next job search. If it isn't, the company will have invested time and money in your training and will be reluctant to waste it. However if your boss gives you some boring, low-skill work, you should do it cheerfully ...


2

To learn the software, it wont take 4 months. Also, most of the time, we need to learn only a subset of the software and not the entire software. To learn theory, yes it will take time! "Consistency" in your efforts is the key. However, only knowing the software and not knowing the underlying theory could be very time consuming (if not dangerous) when ...


0

If you feel you need a written agreement, then get one. “My gut feeling is I trust this person. However I still would like a simple written agreement.” If you don’t truly know somebody — and they want to hire you to do something and you are thinking you need a written agreement — this is not a matter of “gut” feelings or anything related to trust: You ...


1

It would be helpful if you’d indicated what jurisdiction you will be employed within. I am presuming that you are in the USA, although you don’t say. I do not know the answers for the the USA, but here is some information about the UK – just in case someone might find that helpful. In the UK it is a legal requirement that the employer provides the employee ...


2

Verbal agreements that involve money are usually not worth the paper they are written on. It's not clear from the OP who is actually the employer here - the subcontractor, or the company he/she is working for. Either way, unless this is just an informal (and possibly illegal, it if is being done for tax avoidance reasons) "hey, you do some work for me at ...


10

How do I get my employment terms in writing without coming across as distrusting? Rest assured that he has no such qualms when entering into business arrangements with other parties. Asking for the terms of your employment in a written contract isn't just smart, it's good business and it lets him know that you are a person who thinks of such things and ...


10

Disputes about verbal contracts is a common question for this site. While in some locations the employer/employee relationship is covered by a large detailed contract, almost everywhere has at least an offer letter that specifies the basics. That offer letter is sent by the employer and signed and returned by the employee. In your case those basic ...


150

A written contract for an employee is just normal. You don’t have to be afraid about asking. Don’t even make an issue from it. Don’t ask IF there will be a contract as that might really trigger some "don’t you trust me" reaction in your business partner. Better ask: WHEN he will give you the contract for you to sign, as it is the most natural thing to have ...


4

At what stage of the interview/offer process should I raise this issue? I do not wish to waste the company's time or my own by undertaking the full recruitment process only to find at the end that moving states would be required and that I don't wish to take the role. Raise the issue during your initial interview. Just ask if this job can be remote ...


8

I'd just ask during the interview. There will certainly be a place in which the interviewer will ask you if you want to have some additional info on how your possible future job will look like. I'd suggest not to mention explicitly that the remote option is a deal breaker; rather ask something about how they are organized, where the workplace is and how ...


3

Should I enter "4/13/20" for both start and end date? Unless you actually worked on 4/13/20, you should not use that for a start or end date. Instead, you should be using the dates from your previous job, not one that hasn't yet started. Note that the form says "Enter the dates of your last employment". If this doesn't work, then you'll need to call ...


0

Be honest with potential employers. I have never been on a hiring team, but I do not think wanting to leave your current job will reflect poorly on you. Here a few ideas for how to explain your current situation to potential employers: Tell them you are not doing the job you applied for (this is fairly common). Tell them your current job would be better ...


Top 50 recent answers are included