161

I cannot decide whether this is me getting demoted, or just Alice getting promoted, or both at the same. Unless your title is changed, this is just Alice getting promoted. Congratulate Alice, enjoy the new focus of your work, and work hard together so that you both succeed and get rewarded. Also I was planning to ask for a raise soon, maybe even today....


34

15 people is a lot of people to report to one manager. It's entirely reasonable to split the team up. Alice got the chance to step into management. Congratulate her. Having said that, it is reasonable to give the new manager a good bunch of people to work with. Take it as a vote of confidence that you are on her team for that reason. As for ...


21

Am I being demoted? You are not. Your role is what you do. How many layers are above you is a function of the company's organization, not a reflection on you. Most change is just change. You're still doing what you were doing. Even if there isn't growth, there are going to be many mergers, reorgs, others leaving and you moving on throughout your career....


18

Given that you are short on developers it could mean that to save your time your manager is doing the first round of interviews to decide cultural fit. If candidates are selected they could do a second round with one of the developers. If you're concerned I'd suggest talking to your manager 1 on 1 to ask what the plan is and how you can help to make sure the ...


15

This is a common issue. 1) means that the hiring manager has to be sure that you would be effective in the role, able to do the job. He seems to think you are. 2) means that he also wants to be sure that the job is going to give you what you want - will it be fulfilling for you, pay enough, challenge you, and have ethics and culture that you buy into. ...


12

Tell the truth, but be smart about it. Make sure that you don't blame, complain or judge. Make this about business results, not about your emotions. Bad: "I wouldn't like working for ABC since they were dismissive of my ideas". Good: "I'm concerned about the impact on my productivity if I were to work for ABC. I feel I operate best in open and ...


11

Drop the issue. You have asked and your manager has said no. It is reasonable to be concerned about the situation but ultimately it is your managers responsibility, and not yours. There are a few reasons your manager might not want you in the loop: He doesn't need technical advice. Presumably he has hired people before and, rightly or wrongly, feels capable ...


8

Based on your numerous attempts to contact your manager, and the fact that you went over your manager's head in an attempt to resolve the communication gap and nothing changed I don't think there is much else you can do. What you can do is keep doing your job well, show up on time, and don't give your new boss any ammunition to take action against you. ...


7

I would not rely on the person you are replacing. It happens very often in the situations where they simply do not care to put in the time or effort, so if you want to effectively take over then I would drive it as much as possible. Even to the point of speaking with who will be your supervisor and asking what their expectations will be for you in your new ...


7

Your team members feel like you micro-managing because you are. Having to tell someone to pickup the phone when it rings definitely falls in that category. The team objects to the micro-management, because they think you are micro-managing them for no reason. In their eyes, everything was working fine before you came along. Make it clear to the team that ...


7

Your manager will learn in time. My boss did that once, hiring someone against actual objections from his engineers (before I started) and it turned out to be a complete disaster. They still talk about him, and the boss has learnt.


6

I don't know what to make of this. Does your manager have a history of being dishonest with you? If not, then it is what they told you it is. I cannot decide whether this is me getting demoted, or just Alice getting promoted, or both at the same. This Alice being promoted. If your title didn't change to a lesser title, your salary wasn't reduced, and ...


5

Talk to the boss of the manager you're replacing about the hand off. Ask them how they think it should be handled since they are likely the ones in charge of how it should be handled. If necessary get their response in writing and forward it to the manager you're replacing.


5

Even though Mr. Problem is friends with a manager in a higher position than you, the buddy manager is in a different reporting structure and thus different food chain. While I wouldn't dismiss this friendship as unimportant to note outright, I also don't think it should prevent you from making the best decisions for your team. Remember you were the one ...


4

Don't disagree with any of the answers, but I do have some perspective, as this same thing actually happened to me once. At the time my entire group was 3 engineers, with something crazy like 4 empty slots on the org chart, due to Dotcom Bubble related personnel losses. All three of us reported directly to a full-blown manager. I once had someone else in ...


4

You're not being demoted, Alice is being promoted. As all other answers already pointed out. They explained that Alice wanted to get some management experience and since we're growing fast, they decided to make a new group led by Alice, with focus X, and since I'm interested in X, they decided to move me to Alice's team. They seem to be attuned to ...


3

Well, well... this sounds so familiar. Not only considering the reports on the wide Internet, but also my own experience. I am still making efforts to learn how to handle situations - being in a position relatively similar to yours. Rule 1: be on their side, be part of the team. When you started making rules before having a good contact with them, you ...


3

I respectfully suggest you wait until your company can bring people back from furloughs before you pursue this question. You can certainly tell your replacement manager you like working for them. But the timing, in the middle of a health crisis, is very likely not so good to try to ask for a change like this.


3

Talk to your manager again. ABC's manager is not yet your manager, so your current manager needs to be fully informed anyway. Your manager may have an answer to the question of you staying with her team or not; you need that information before going into any other discussions with other teams.


3

Three primary steps: Act professional. Follow a process and document everything. Escalate as necessary. We don't know both sides of the story, but given the description, it seems the manager's behavior is aptly inappropriate. We should focus on finding the reason behind the incident and treat that accordingly. Some pointers (start doing immediately if ...


2

Collaborate with the hiring manager (or closest role) to develop the requirements for the role, and asses the candidates against those requirements. If you've interviewed/hired before, you're likely a proficient interviewer. What you might lack is an awareness of the specific capabilities that a more senior role requires. Be professional and patient in ...


2

You have it right: this manager is learning her job herself. As frustrating as it may be for you, you should try to help her out. Give her the benefit of the doubt. Keep a log of open questions you have for her. Keep it in a text file or some such thing. Keep it pared down to the minimum; remove questions that get stale, and don't duplicate questions. ...


2

It is very difficult to assess the real story there. Personally, you should do nothing officially. If your colleague is a good guy as you mention, then advise him to go to HR and discuss with them the issue, asking for mediation, or any other help which is in place in the company. However, your colleague might want to update his CV and start assessing the ...


2

This is a tough situation to be in. What I have heard from recruiters (and the experiences of friends and relatives has confirmed this) is that in the IT world any employment gap of longer than two months in your resume will cause prospective employers to shuffle you to the back of the pile. A six month gap sends you straight to the "round file". I've ...


2

If your goal is to ensure that the new hire is technically up to scratch, ask your manager if you can provide a technical test, or setup a test online via 3rd party supplier.


1

This situation cannot be solved outside the place. You need to get the people working on that floor, explain the situation, all pro's and con's, ask for feedback. You need to also know the number of meetings which are expected to take, place, and the estimated number of participants. Maybe it is possible to use a proper meeting room for meetings, and leave ...


1

As the others say, there's something unknown going on here. Maybe your colleague knows exactly what he did to cause this, but if not his first step should be to go to his manager in private and ask about it. Depending on their relationship and company culture, this could be: "Have I done something wrong?" to "I'm sorry, I've obviously done something ...


1

If you are in the U.S., PMI certification is considered the gold standard for project management positions. If you choose option 1, I strongly encourage you to pursue PMI certification. If you do not have PMI certification, and you are competing with other applicants who do, it is very unlikely that you will be the most competitive application unless there ...


1

So I'd agree on DJClayworth's answer. It's great you got this feedback as it shows where you need to work on your interviewing. Basically, you showed the interviewer why your skills/knowledge/experience makes you the kind of person they want, but you didn't convince them of why they should hire you. As the manager says, it's a two way thing, how you fit ...


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