216

Anything serious enough to get you immediately fired is serious enough to jeopardize your future career. Don't do it. Hand in your notice and either negotiate with your employer to leave before 4 weeks, or just stick it out.


211

Your employment is not dependent on others' employment (or resignation). Period. If you chose to leave, you are free to, provided you fulfill the requirements as mentioned in the contract regarding the exit process. If the organization has a backup plan, they will work according to that. If they don't have one: not your problem. If they feel they cannot ...


209

This is exactly what a notice period is for -- to transfer as much of your knowledge about the work as possible to other people so the company doesn't lose it. They aren't "taking from you" anything except what is theirs because they paid you for it. It's not about you, it's about the business. Stop sulking and cooperate. As others have pointed out, you're ...


178

There is no way to “turn around” these devs. Short of some come-to-Jesus experience where they decide to work hard for no good reason, they are doing the reasonable thing for the position they are in. They know the company is trying to offload them, what possible reason do they have to work hard? And given your company’s policies, which you seem to be in ...


168

I think you are misunderstanding the question from your boss, and over thinking the situation. Your boss isn't asking how long you want as notice for the person, she actually wants to know what the effect of this person leaving has on your team and delivery. "I'd say 4 weeks as we'll need X here while we fix that new module they spent 4 months on. No one ...


163

It would be unprofessional to leave and just not come back without any warning or reason or anything. What would not be unprofessional is to go to your boss and say something like: "I feel like I'm being underutilized here over the last week or so. I'd like to move up my end date; this would benefit me by having some free time, and would benefit you ...


149

The best and most professional thing I have found to do is create a handover document. This would include step by step procedures on any tasks only you are familiar with (complete with screenshots if necessary), things like network diagrams of clients (depending on what your position is), any passwords that only you know etc,. Everything consolidated in to ...


145

In a situation like yours, a good starting point is to present the current use of Git as the rule. Add simple instructions like Where do I get the current code? Check out the Git repository XYZ. How do I make modifications to the code? Use development environment ABC, modify code and commit changes to Git repository XYZ Include Git into the written rules ...


139

Red flag. In fact, multiple red flags. Don't give notice without the signed contract in hand. You only have this mans word that you have a position to go to. Red flag. In this day and age, that is not enough. It is like buying something with IOU-notes, it is just not how things are done. A company should be professional enough to know this. Red flag 9 ...


133

You want favours from those you tried to get rid of but couldn't. You openly admit that these people would be out the door but for company hiring rules. You know it. They know it. Everyone knows that a PIP is just paperwork collection for future termination, so in their position I would be putting my work last in favour of interviewing and networking. Put ...


128

This is a very graceful exit This isn't being Fired. A lot of people use "fired" as casual slang for any layoff, but that's wrong and don't go around saying that. Fired is you do something bad, like embarrass the company on social media, and a security guard watches you pack your things. This isn't even a layoff, where you're also escorted out of the ...


121

You do not get offered health insurance, you are no longer getting your full 40hr per week as promised when you first started, and you have yet to get one raise in 4 years. No need to feel guilty. And as DarkCygnus (and everyone else) will tell you, sign a new contract before you give notice.


105

My question is would it be inappropriate to leave at the end of the day? Yes it would be inappropriate. You gave two weeks notice, so either tolerate the cold shoulder and work out the two weeks, or talk with your boss and ask if the notice period can be reduced to a single week. Even if your boss isn't acting professionally, you should. And keep in mind ...


102

I've never been in a situation like this, but I would stick to the required notice period (ie: one month) and move on. You even went above and beyond (IMHO) by asking the new employer if you could push back your start date to accommodate the old employer's needs. In a perfect world, you'd be able to make both employers happy and not burn any bridges, but ...


100

Instead of defending your teammates, who act reasonably, like the other posts, I will give you advice. This is the part of your post we need: Extracting work from people who are on PIPs but who we also cannot fire? For the 5 of us trapped on this team, we stand to lose a lot of money because of this and a lot of possibility for advancement as well. Any ...


96

It was rather silly to lie and it was completely unnecessary. Instead, you should have just told your new employer when you would like to start and avoided any lies. Taking just a few weeks off in between jobs is very common. Unless these are two very small companies and you have a very prominent role in both, the two friends are unlikely to bring your ...


85

Some of the reasons why conventional wisdom says, 'No, don't quit your job until you have another one lined up': Job searches can take a LONG time, often many months or even years. That's a long time to be out of work with no income and no active experience. (And a side project might or might not convince them it is continuing experience.) People who are ...


83

While others are addressing the right point that it is not your problem, I think your original question is not addressed: How do I tell him that I plan to leave although my co-worker left recently? Tell him in a face-to-face discussion. Say something like this (with your own variation!) Hey boss, something has changed on my personal front and I would ...


80

The blow will be bad, no matter what you do, but there are some things you can do to minimise it: Do it sooner rather than later Management is working hard on a plan for the future. Right now, that plan includes you. They might be thinking up new structures, where you play a specific role. Knowing as soon as possible that you won’t be around will save them ...


80

I'm legally obligated to provide 3 weeks of severance. Then it seems to me that the answer is clear: give your 3 week notice, serve it, get paid and leave, take good use of that time to recover from burnout and then start your new job with a fresh mindset and energy. To my point of view, framing this situation so they fire you in order to get more money ...


78

No It's not ethical. You were acting of your own free will when you signed the contract that now makes you stay another month. It's not a hardship or their doing. You did that. In addition, you still get paid. You'd be the first to complain if the company would take the same stance ("he's leaving anyway, why hold up our side of the contract"). The ...


75

Should I still give two weeks' notice if I know my company won't honor a notice period? In the US, the typical protocol is for the employee to give at least two weeks' notice, and for the employer to honor those two weeks. Unless you have a contract or local law that says otherwise, you aren't legally obligated to provide any notice, nor is the company ...


70

I agree with the other answers saying you shouldn't mention it because the candidate will then start asking you about why you are leaving. Instead, you can get the same message across by saying the following: Though I'm doing the interview today, I'm not actually the person you will be working with most closely. That would be Jane, our program manager. ...


69

Another option, and the one I'd recommend: Tell your new employer that you will not be able to start less than two work weeks after you have received, and accepted, their formal offer, and give notice then. They should have no objection to that, since (a) you should never quit a job until you have the firm offer for the next one in hand, if you can ...


69

This is not a decision you want to spend a long time contemplating: the longer you take to act the more suspicious it will look when you eventually come forward. I really see three options: 1. Honesty In this situation you are - somewhat - putting yourself at this company's mercy, and also counting on their generosity, which may be ... silly. You go to ...


66

Talk to your boss immediately and begin job searching now You have just learned a very important, and unflattering fact about your new company. Namely, they don't want to hire you right now. I know you're excited about the new position, but take a long hard look at your new company. This is probably a place you DO NOT want to work. The rest of this post ...


58

During a 2-week notice you are expected to perform your job duties (though in an ever-diminishing role as you hand them off). If you resign and decline to perform your job duties as requested (in this case, travel for work), you are effectively quitting without notice. I would instead offer resignation, citing the unexpected level of travel. At that point,...


57

are there reasonable limitations to how much information I should share, and should I even teach junior staff during notice? If you want to remain professional, and keep a good reputation intact, you work hard during your notice period - documenting, aiding in knowledge transfer, and helping in any way you can. That's what a notice period is for, and that'...


57

Run. Some answers already told you about red flags, but were a bit unspecific what these red flags are. 9 months probation time. This is comparatively long (and in some countries even illegal). Why does an employer need such a long time to make up their mind? You will know after a few months if a person is fitting or not, so it is no explanation such a ...


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