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217

Anything serious enough to get you immediately fired is serious enough to jeopardize your future career. Don't do it. Hand in your notice and either negotiate with your employer to leave before 4 weeks, or just stick it out.


212

Your employment is not dependent on others' employment (or resignation). Period. If you chose to leave, you are free to, provided you fulfill the requirements as mentioned in the contract regarding the exit process. If the organization has a backup plan, they will work according to that. If they don't have one: not your problem. If they feel they cannot ...


206

This is exactly what a notice period is for -- to transfer as much of your knowledge about the work as possible to other people so the company doesn't lose it. They aren't "taking from you" anything except what is theirs because they paid you for it. It's not about you, it's about the business. Stop sulking and cooperate. As others have pointed out, you're ...


168

I think you are misunderstanding the question from your boss, and over thinking the situation. Your boss isn't asking how long you want as notice for the person, she actually wants to know what the effect of this person leaving has on your team and delivery. "I'd say 4 weeks as we'll need X here while we fix that new module they spent 4 months on. No one ...


149

The best and most professional thing I have found to do is create a handover document. This would include step by step procedures on any tasks only you are familiar with (complete with screenshots if necessary), things like network diagrams of clients (depending on what your position is), any passwords that only you know etc,. Everything consolidated in to ...


146

In a situation like yours, a good starting point is to present the current use of Git as the rule. Add simple instructions like Where do I get the current code? Check out the Git repository XYZ. How do I make modifications to the code? Use development environment ABC, modify code and commit changes to Git repository XYZ Include Git into the written rules ...


139

Red flag. In fact, multiple red flags. Don't give notice without the signed contract in hand. You only have this mans word that you have a position to go to. Red flag. In this day and age, that is not enough. It is like buying something with IOU-notes, it is just not how things are done. A company should be professional enough to know this. Red flag 9 ...


121

You do not get offered health insurance, you are no longer getting your full 40hr per week as promised when you first started, and you have yet to get one raise in 4 years. No need to feel guilty. And as DarkCygnus (and everyone else) will tell you, sign a new contract before you give notice.


116

This is a very graceful exit This isn't being Fired. A lot of people use "fired" as casual slang for any layoff, but that's wrong and don't go around saying that. Fired is you do something bad, like embarrass the company on social media, and a security guard watches you pack your things. This isn't even a layoff, where you're also escorted out of the ...


100

I've never been in a situation like this, but I would stick to the required notice period (ie: one month) and move on. You even went above and beyond (IMHO) by asking the new employer if you could push back your start date to accommodate the old employer's needs. In a perfect world, you'd be able to make both employers happy and not burn any bridges, but ...


96

It was rather silly to lie and it was completely unnecessary. Instead, you should have just told your new employer when you would like to start and avoided any lies. Taking just a few weeks off in between jobs is very common. Unless these are two very small companies and you have a very prominent role in both, the two friends are unlikely to bring your ...


83

While others are addressing the right point that it is not your problem, I think your original question is not addressed: How do I tell him that I plan to leave although my co-worker left recently? Tell him in a face-to-face discussion. Say something like this (with your own variation!) Hey boss, something has changed on my personal front and I would ...


79

No It's not ethical. You were acting of your own free will when you signed the contract that now makes you stay another month. It's not a hardship or their doing. You did that. In addition, you still get paid. You'd be the first to complain if the company would take the same stance ("he's leaving anyway, why hold up our side of the contract"). The ...


77

Some of the reasons why conventional wisdom says, 'No, don't quit your job until you have another one lined up': Job searches can take a LONG time, often many months or even years. That's a long time to be out of work with no income and no active experience. (And a side project might or might not convince them it is continuing experience.) People who are ...


72

Should I still give two weeks' notice if I know my company won't honor a notice period? In the US, the typical protocol is for the employee to give at least two weeks' notice, and for the employer to honor those two weeks. Unless you have a contract or local law that says otherwise, you aren't legally obligated to provide any notice, nor is the company ...


72

Let me preface this by saying I understand your concern and where you're coming from. I would have a similar reaction. To answer your question, you don't. It's not your job any more. The new developer will be the sole owner of the product just like you were, and will use whatever tools they deem necessary. What you can do is present your boss with a list of ...


70

I agree with the other answers saying you shouldn't mention it because the candidate will then start asking you about why you are leaving. Instead, you can get the same message across by saying the following: Though I'm doing the interview today, I'm not actually the person you will be working with most closely. That would be Jane, our program manager. ...


69

Another option, and the one I'd recommend: Tell your new employer that you will not be able to start less than two work weeks after you have received, and accepted, their formal offer, and give notice then. They should have no objection to that, since (a) you should never quit a job until you have the firm offer for the next one in hand, if you can ...


69

This is not a decision you want to spend a long time contemplating: the longer you take to act the more suspicious it will look when you eventually come forward. I really see three options: 1. Honesty In this situation you are - somewhat - putting yourself at this company's mercy, and also counting on their generosity, which may be ... silly. You go to ...


66

You should behave exactly the same as if you weren't on your notice period. You are still in your contract with your employer so you should behave accordingly - even if they don't. If you feel that you cannot contribute during this period, for whatever reason, have a conversation with your boss/HR about gardening leave: Gardening leave describes the ...


66

Talk to your boss immediately and begin job searching now You have just learned a very important, and unflattering fact about your new company. Namely, they don't want to hire you right now. I know you're excited about the new position, but take a long hard look at your new company. This is probably a place you DO NOT want to work. The rest of this ...


58

During a 2-week notice you are expected to perform your job duties (though in an ever-diminishing role as you hand them off). If you resign and decline to perform your job duties as requested (in this case, travel for work), you are effectively quitting without notice. I would instead offer resignation, citing the unexpected level of travel. At that point,...


57

are there reasonable limitations to how much information I should share, and should I even teach junior staff during notice? If you want to remain professional, and keep a good reputation intact, you work hard during your notice period - documenting, aiding in knowledge transfer, and helping in any way you can. That's what a notice period is for, and that'...


56

After. You don't have a job; you're suggesting you quit so that you can start looking for a job, and that's just not how it's done. It might take you months or even years to get a new job. You don't want to be both out of work AND worrying about your employer bad mouthing you (and they might when ever you quit). You're more desirable if you're already ...


55

Run. Some answers already told you about red flags, but were a bit unspecific what these red flags are. 9 months probation time. This is comparatively long (and in some countries even illegal). Why does an employer need such a long time to make up their mind? You will know after a few months if a person is fitting or not, so it is no explanation such a ...


53

But according my experience, I know that most new employer wait maximum one month and sometimes just 1, 2 weeks. That is incorrect. I have worked in India for several years and I’ve worked for and interviewed with several companies. Irrespective of experience level, we know that we will need to wait for 2–3 months after we release the offer letter. If the ...


50

It's all a matter of wording. Don't say "I hereby give 3 months' notice of my intention to terminate my employment", say "I hereby give notice of my intention to terminate my employment after Friday, January 19 2013." Then you have given them 3 months and a day notice. Given that your contract says 3 months, you are within that requirement. No one is going ...


50

What's your duty? Give it to them - if they want it. As a paid employee, you have a fiduciary duty to provide them with this code that belongs to them in the first place. You should not even begin to consider other alternatives. It's theirs. They pay you. Give it to them. If they ever find out you withheld it when you knew they wanted it, you could be in ...


49

Advice: Pay the two days. The amount of money that represents is likely to be trivial compared to any bad feedback your other employees hear about. Every interaction you have with your employees is a way to show exactly what you think of them. If you are going to try and nickel and dime a paycheck then that sets a very bad precedent. Do you have to ...


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