7

Short answer: No. I think you're approaching this the wrong way. This seems to be your thought process: When I leave the company, I'll be leaving them in a lurch. So I want to give them a longer notice period than usual. But the place I'll move to will pay much more. So that longer notice period actually costs me money - I'd be working longer at the ...


4

Unless you are worried about them firing you immediately and being without a job for a few weeks, I don't think you need to negotiate a LONGER period with the company you're leaving. Negotiate your start date with your new company and then inform the company you're leaving. Unless you're really disliked and/or nowhere near as valuable as you say you are, ...


3

Different countries have different notice periods. Say two weeks in the US, and often three months in Europe. The important thing is that you have the same notice period as everyone else. In the USA, your current employer knows he can fire you quickly and you could leave quickly, your new employer knows you can start quickly, it all works out. In Europe, ...


3

I want to be very explicit with my answer. The others before mine are reasonable at getting at the generics, but there are a few things you're overlooking. My current role is somewhat critical. Things won't grind to a halt without me, but it will be a pretty big hit, and current projects won't complete on time. It would also probably be a pretty big morale ...


2

The best strategy is to let them ask for longer notice and then agree at more compensation. So hand in two weeks notice and hope they realise it needs more time, and then regretfully decline citing personal commitments until they pay you to stay longer. Everyone's happy and it looks like you're doing them a favour. If you initiate it then in all likelihood ...


2

I feel like you're missing the point: The notice period you have is there for the protection of the company; it's specifically there so that, if you were to leave abruptly, you are legally not allowed to leave so abruptly as to cause significant damage to the company and/or their systems. If the company has allowed you to work "at will", then they ...


2

I'd just ask the company from whom you have a pending offer if they could have your start date be a month out from when they give you the offer letter. Then, at that point, when you're giving notice to your current employer you give them a one month notice instead of a two week notice and bam, problem solved.


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