211

Your employment is not dependent on others' employment (or resignation). Period. If you chose to leave, you are free to, provided you fulfill the requirements as mentioned in the contract regarding the exit process. If the organization has a backup plan, they will work according to that. If they don't have one: not your problem. If they feel they cannot ...


121

You do not get offered health insurance, you are no longer getting your full 40hr per week as promised when you first started, and you have yet to get one raise in 4 years. No need to feel guilty. And as DarkCygnus (and everyone else) will tell you, sign a new contract before you give notice.


118

This is a very graceful exit This isn't being Fired. A lot of people use "fired" as casual slang for any layoff, but that's wrong and don't go around saying that. Fired is you do something bad, like embarrass the company on social media, and a security guard watches you pack your things. This isn't even a layoff, where you're also escorted out of the ...


83

While others are addressing the right point that it is not your problem, I think your original question is not addressed: How do I tell him that I plan to leave although my co-worker left recently? Tell him in a face-to-face discussion. Say something like this (with your own variation!) Hey boss, something has changed on my personal front and I would ...


66

Talk to your boss immediately and begin job searching now You have just learned a very important, and unflattering fact about your new company. Namely, they don't want to hire you right now. I know you're excited about the new position, but take a long hard look at your new company. This is probably a place you DO NOT want to work. The rest of this ...


36

How do I convince my boss that the company, my colleagues and future projects are best served by me setting up the resources needed for its continued support rather than having to spend my last weeks here squeezing billable hours out of a customer and setting up scaffolding that no-one will really know how to build upon? You don't. If there are any ...


33

I accepted the offer but I feel guilty since the company I'm employed with will be left with no tech. How should I tell my boss? There is no need to explain yourself or to feel guilty. It's your life and ultimately you have to look out for yourself and work in a place you get paid well and are comfortable. You just hand your notice period, serve it, and ...


28

I'll make Gregory's comment into an answer: You don't owe anyone anything. Just announce that you'll be leaving as of X date so nobody gets caught by surprise. The circumstances and details of you leaving are your business and your business only. You can give more details in a private setting to friends and colleagues you trust, but only as much as you ...


27

Problems caused by you leaving the company are not your problem. Plain and simple. This is something that managers like to claim when employees are leaving the company, and incidentally, those managers who make such claims are also those who have to utter them the most. That being said, let us assume that your manager is merely misguided and does not mean ...


24

Notice period is calculated in calendar days (not working days) so the weekend is included, the notice period begins the day after you give notice (not the same day) so if you gave notice on the 15th of then the first day of your notice period is actually the 16th making the last day of your notice period the 15th of December i.e. your last day of employment ...


23

Talk to your boss about it. Tell him that your start date has been delayed by an as of yet undisclosed amount of time, and ask whether you can stick around for another week or two. Whether they agree or not depends on a lot of variables, but you stand to lose nothing by simply asking. In the mean time I would contact your new employers and tell them that ...


21

Sadly, you have no other choice than to grit your teeth and continue to do your work. Follow any work related instructions, do your tasks and continue to be the same reliable and thorough employee that you have been before your resignation (but of course only up to a certain level of "caring about"; above that, see point 3) in the paragraph below). Also, if ...


20

What is the best way to handle? You continue to act in a professional manner during your notice period and don't worry about how your soon to be former manager behaves.


18

"...the company I'm employed with will be left with no tech..." You have already spent much time and energy trying to assure that <the company I'm employed with> will continue to have a tech. Unfortunately <the company I'm employed with> refuses to coöperate. If your employer wants to have a tech working for them, it is their responsibility ...


14

This answer is written keeping your current context in mind and my experience working in India. What I want to know is if I abscond this organisation, would they be able to take any serious actions? I am assuming you have already completed the paperwork and signed the offer letter and any other papers. So, absconding is never a good idea. It could be ...


14

Short answer: You don't. It's not your problem and certainly not one of your making. Simply put, replacing you and your skillset is the responsibility of the organisation, not yours. If they haven't taken into consideration the Bus Factor, then this is a problem they will need to address. Don't take this responsibility on to yourself as it never was yours ...


13

They always say don't let anyone know at your job if you are leaving as this can make work life difficult. Thank them, they are right. Continue as usual, until it's time to submit your resignation (i.e., you have a confirmed offer with you) and then, serve the notice period and leave. Till then, continue as usual, including accepting the salary, promotion, ...


11

Most places I have worked prohibited taking PTO during the notice period. The first thing I would do if I was in your situation is check my contract and employee handbook to see if that is the case for you. If it is then you will need to decide if you want to take the 3 days PTO before handing in your notice or just sacrifice your accrued PTO.


10

The new employer have told him that they will withdraw the offer if I cannot get my notice period down to six weeks. This is apparently due to a current employee of theirs leaving who needs to do some handing over of work to me. Offer to work with the current employee who is leaving on nights and weekends to do the handover work. Or as @fireshark519 ...


10

I appreciate many of you will tell me to wait it out, but is it really worth doing so? Yes, it is really worth doing so. What you have now is a plan and plans change. You have waited this far, why not wait couple more days, to get rid of the problem in a final (i.e, deterministic) way? Assuming the worst case scenario, if the conditional offer is ...


9

Welcome to the Workplace. It's not your problem or fault that someone else has left the company. If you made a decision and you are sure about that, you need to talk to your manager and say you'll leave. 15-10 days is a good time for them to know so they can organize things better. Also, see if your contract say something about how much time you have to ...


9

On Monday I'll have to mail them my last 3 months payslips, negotiate salary and tell them the date of joining. They'll be asking about the notice period in current company. You're overthinking this - they're asking about notice period because they want to know when you can start, and that's likely it. So when they ask about notice period, you can simply ...


9

My plan at the moment is to send an email to the HR Manager requesting written confirmation. That is the right plan. Get it in writing. Remind them of the verbal agreement and ask for written confirmation. Although, I'm not sure the HR Manager will give this to me now she's been asked to increase my notice to 3 months. That's out of your control. ...


9

There will never be a right moment to resign. No company is ever happy to see someone leave. (Well, unless you're very bad at your job) Once/if you have a signed offer, it's definitely better to resign before the team building event. But don't preemptively quit. Quitting right after the event might be awkward, but do it politely and professionally and you ...


8

Resigning during the event is not a good option. Not only is your boss likely busy with other things, but in many cases there will be some formalities involved, if only writing a letter to HR. Do notice that a "2 weeks notice" is a minimum notice period. If you plan to leave 2 weeks after the company event, you can tell HR/your boss a week before the event ...


8

If things happen in that order, could I start at my new employer during that two week window? Yes, you can. Pennsylvania is a at will state, meaning that you can leave a company at any time and they can let you go for any reason. This works in your favor in that you don't have to wait X number of days before starting to work for another company if ...


7

It's true; 3 months is not uncommon for a senior position. Just be open and honest about it with both your potential new employer and the recruiter. You should definitely have a signed contract in place before resigning. They'll wait for you. In some cases, they may have an urgency to hire sooner, and that can be expressed by buying you out of your notice ...


7

What can I now do to make sure there is smooth and timely relieving process. At this point, the only thing you can do is look through your contract and see if there is a provision that allows for a verbal resignation. If there is, show it to your HR department and ask your manager to confirm the date you resigned. In the future, you need to make sure that ...


7

That amount of notice period is just ridiculous. Let's say January 2020 you want to leave the company. You say to your boss "I want to leave", and the boss says "no way". Don't you think your motivation would suffer? And your productivity would really suffer? To a point where they fire you? If you want to leave, you can make them make you leave. Still, ...


7

The only one who can truly give you the answer is your company. Companies will have different rules on whether it's classed as 11 months or 12 months. If you don't want to ask and give it away that you're planning on leaving I would personally just wait the extra month if there is no specific reason you plan on leaving or if the reason is not urgent. For ...


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