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0

I am in India, and I had a similar situation, where the offer was that I had to join within 60 days, but my then employer had a 90 day notice requirement. I had worked there for 10 years, on great terms, and I had a chat with my manager and told him that I wanted to leave and wanted a reduction in the notice period. They took their own sweet time about ...


3

I see that you are in India, which has slightly odd rules (for westerners), but this should still be appropriate; Talk to the new company; make sure they know that you have 90 days notice to serve, but you are trying to get that reduced. If they insist on 75 days, that's a red flag anyway. If the new company is OK with your notice period, resign. Give the ...


-1

Don't be pressurised into doing something rash. Instead set out clearly what your red lines are. By all means be frank about the cause of the strife: i.e. Team Lead's specific behaviour. You may get called names in return, but quite likely the rest of the team are silently suffering and will cautiously support you. Obviously your plan is to exit, one way ...


2

I don't disagree with other answers, esp. the high-ranked ones. But maybe a few more questions that you should answer for yourself, to make it clearer to yourself what your goals and priorities should be: Do you feel your skills and what you have to offer a new employer are sufficiently scarce that such a new employer would be happy to wait 3 months for you ...


1

In Europe, not honoring your notice period might even have economic repercussions, so think about it very hard, read your contract and get informed about labor laws. Don't just do it on a whim, it might have quite dire consequences. Also, as others have already said, leaving a company on such bad terms is never a good idea in general. Always try to act ...


5

Your own research essentially says that you are not being properly compensated. Why would you agree to more stringent conditions on your termination of employment? You should first ensure you are at least comparably compensated - which appears to be at least 15K more - and given the extra hours you are working you should ask for more yet.


0

Give notice now. There are better opportunities available.


-2

If you have an agreement to change teams by a certain date, I'd wait until that date is up before leaving. The posturing done by your current lead may not matter much. If the organisation goes back on its word, I think you could probably violate the notice period, and I'm doubtful a judge would rule against you. You should study your contract carefully, and ...


9

What would happen if i do so? That depends on a lot on your local labor laws. Most likely you would be in breach of contract. You may want to consult with a local labor lawyer what the consequences could be and how likely they are. It would certainly burn bridges with your current employer and reflect badly on your ethics and professionalism. It's possible ...


7

Considering the shitty attitude of the lead, I am considering quitting and leaving with immediate effect, without working during my notice period (which is a month). I would suggest you don't do this just because some coworker's bad attitude. Put your name and professionalism first, and hand in and serve your notice period like you agreed to. This person ...


3

As a general rule: Do not sign anything out without a consideration. And this consideration have to be comparable, at least in your opinion, to what you signing off


-3

I have found the job adverts online for the roles we are hiring for and both are a much higher salary than I am getting. Include these positions in your job search. Have a recruiter present you for one of these jobs and have him withhold your name until you get an interview.


80

Be clear about your goals before you negotiate Every successful negotiation starts with defining what "success" means. What is the desired outcome, what are the minimum outcomes you are willing to accept and what are your non-starters? It's a bit unclear what you want: If you already have a one foot out the door, your goal should be to keep the ...


29

Longer notice periods are very common for more senior/valuable staff as it helps with continuity and knowledge transfer should someone decide to leave - and usually the employee is compensated by a commensurate wage and the extra safety net that a longer term gives them if they need to start a job search when they weren't expecting it. In the situation you ...


11

As mentioned in comments, check your current contract to see whether your notice period already increases with time served. (This would be pretty common in the UK.) If your notice has already increased to something similar to the new proposal, you might as well sign the new contract to take advantage of the matching pay increase. If your current contract ...


0

There's this brand new technology that works pretty effectively when we know that people have been out of the office for a while and are likely sifting through a pile of e-mails. It has potential to lower a lot of undue stress and anxiety if we use it in a timely fashion. People are lax to use it nowadays, but it's actually been a huge problem solver since ...


7

Ask the questions now, both on the documents and the onboarding. There is no reason to wait for acknowledgement, you can assume that they received it and continue directly. By asking now, you put the ball in the company's court to follow up on this, and it shows pro-activeness. They should give you the information you asked about and you can continue as ...


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