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0

I'm from Belgium, not sure if this is the same in Germany, but at least you'll get some food for thought and check if you have similar laws in Germany. When giving your notice, there's a notice period your company has to respect (depending on how long you've been working there, is set by the government). It can be shortened, but the employee has to agree to ...


2

I've already signed the contract for a new job starting on the 1st of January I wouldn't want them to find a way to terminate me before fearing a decrease in my productivity due to my resignation (can they even do it?). I do not know what the legal situation is in Germany. I have direct and indirect experience of this situation in the United States. If ...


7

Go ahead and tell the boss now. Keep in mind, the reason companies like having a long notice period is that it gives them more warning about personnel problems they need to solve - because there are typically a lot of hurdles that have to be overcome (to the point where, no, they're not solving all of them in the notice period and having a replacement in ...


-1

Avoid drama for as long as possible by giving notice at the 2 month mark, as per your contract. Giving more notice does, in principle, help them start the replacement process earlier, but it might also end with you being let go earlier than you'd like.


6

You absolutely should tell the HR representative at your new company the situation. If they believe you are still working, they might not be in a particular rush to get things finalized for your work permit. Hopefully, they can expedite the process. Never lie to a potential employer. Although it probably wouldnt hurt you if they found out, at the very ...


2

"6 months" means a complete 6 month period from the date of joining. Not 6 month-names. However, depending on how far you are in the application process, it would be prudent to tell potential employers that you need a full month of notice. Remember that there is usually a gap between handing in your application and being invited to interview, another gap ...


2

Ask? The only way to be sure. Otherwise any answers will be speculation


0

I was 'laid off' after a three year contract ended. I first asked for letters of recommendation, so they couldn't back peddle on my later on and say I was terminated. I then went on vacation for a month while on unemployment... applying for jobs the entire time. I enjoyed every moment of it... Instead, I am taking the time now to continue studying and ...


4

You might want to consider that your closest coworkers already know you are underperforming. They might disagree about your potential performance, given enough time, but they are more directly aware of your current performance than your manager is. If you are evasive about your reason for leaving, they will draw their own conclusions. There's little reason ...


116

This is a very graceful exit This isn't being Fired. A lot of people use "fired" as casual slang for any layoff, but that's wrong and don't go around saying that. Fired is you do something bad, like embarrass the company on social media, and a security guard watches you pack your things. This isn't even a layoff, where you're also escorted out of the ...


5

In many sensitive workplace situations, people will want details. You may worry that they will jump to conclusions if you don't provide them. However, it's important to keep two things in mind. First, some people will jump to conclusions even if you give them details. You can't hope to control what other people think. So, be true to yourself. Secondly, it's ...


6

Normally a week's notice is required, but they offered me up to a month, which I took Good, use it to prepare well and find a job where you don't have an expectation mismatch. My managers were discreet about the whole thing, offered a reference, and I was allowed to announce that I would be leaving. What's happened is already past, but you have a good ...


4

There are couple of things to be noted: You were fired but the manager/company did you a favor when they gave you a recommendation and time to apply for a new job. So that's completely professional on their part. By saying that you were fired doesn't affect you or the people working at the company so there is nothing wrong telling people that you were fired....


28

I'll make Gregory's comment into an answer: You don't owe anyone anything. Just announce that you'll be leaving as of X date so nobody gets caught by surprise. The circumstances and details of you leaving are your business and your business only. You can give more details in a private setting to friends and colleagues you trust, but only as much as you ...


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