New answers tagged

14

So basically, you understood the agreement to be an "official" shortening of the notice period, while the manager understood it (or at least is treating it) as if you'll keep working for them until whatever time is convenient for them between now and the end of the contractual notice period, at which point they'll make it official. Since you didn't ...


3

I'm taking Glorfindel's advice and requesting the accounts be merged. To provide a rough summary: My new job starts in 8 weeks from now. I was burned out, and asked my new employer to give me 8 weeks before I start. My original plan was to wait 4 weeks and continue working at my current employer, and then provide 3 weeks of notice to my current employer, ...


2

Take Joe Strazerre's answer first. Then consider your company. Would they be willing to cheat you out of money even if it is illegal, or try to? If you give notice before the 18 months then they could demand the money from you, even though it is totally unjustified. And they could deduct it from your salary, which is illegal, but that doesn't stop some ...


3

Should you voluntarily leave the company before the completion of 18 months of service from your visa issue date, you shall reimburse the company all visa cost. The time at which you "voluntarily leave" is the time that you leave. If you continue working after delivering your notice, then you haven't left yet. The language is pretty clear, and ...


2

Don't sign anything and just leave after your initial notice period. This whole situation sounds dangerous and toxic, just get out and forget about the whole thing. You're burned out and underpaid, and you have a new job ready to go. Just try to wrap things up and move on with your life. Don't try any complex maneuvers that could get you further enmeshed ...


3

What is considered the day I “voluntarily leave” the company? The day I give the notice or the day I actually leave the company? It has nothing to do with when you give your notice. For purposes of a payback agreement, it depends on your last day on the job. So give your notice whenever you like. Make sure your last day of work is more than 18 months after ...


11

For starters, you are always better being dismissed/let go/fired by your employer in terms of the amount of compensation you will be paid in Ontario. As an employee in Ontario, you are not required to give any notice to your employer, unless you have it as part of your contract. You stated your contract requires 3 weeks notice. When an employer in Ontario ...


27

I'd say this solution is a hybrid of my interpretation of the advice from @DarkCyprus and a kind redditor. So, today was rough, but more-or-less rewarding. I received yet another demand to sign the paperwork that would put more responsibility on me (and the vaguely-worded promise of the "opportunity/ability" to earn more money), and increase the ...


4

I can't think why thay would ever give you 8 months pay if you have already given 2 months notice. If they decide that you are becoming a niusance, they could send you on "gardening leave" for whatever remains of the two months - effectively keeping you on the payroll but telling you that you that don't have to do any work for them. Alternatively, ...


75

I'm legally obligated to provide 3 weeks of severance. Then it seems to me that the answer is clear: give your 3 week notice, serve it, get paid and leave, take good use of that time to recover from burnout and then start your new job with a fresh mindset and energy. To my point of view, framing this situation so they fire you in order to get more money ...


2

Gnat already linked you to a very relevant question you should read and consider (How can I push back against my manager and HR trying to extend my relieving date?). My two cents on your situation, given that you need the relieving letter to start a new job: (from your comments): But I am getting no official response. This has become a deadlock. Since I ...


1

Don't worry about it. Business is business. If the company was going underwater, do you think they would give a second thought to terminating you? If you do, you're naive and you need to snap out of it, because the answer is a thorough and resounding NO. And thus, you should treat them with the exact same amount of respect they treat you, which is none. ...


3

Don't needlessly limit yourself. Three reasons I say this: "job offer which is so good that I can't turn it down" "I'm aware that my manager, the leadership team, and my coworkers all consider me a top performing employee." Over the last 2 months, many of the top performing employees have left my current company. In other words, your ...


0

Nope there is very little you can do to cushion the blow just hand in your notice work out your notice period and then leave that's it. Never try to be super nice and helpful when leaving any org as they will take advantage of this for sure. Be formal, here's my notice this is how long this is what I think my end date should be that's it. If you had someone ...


81

The blow will be bad, no matter what you do, but there are some things you can do to minimise it: Do it sooner rather than later Management is working hard on a plan for the future. Right now, that plan includes you. They might be thinking up new structures, where you play a specific role. Knowing as soon as possible that you won’t be around will save them ...


12

I'm seeing a very similar situation whereby employees are switching employer to those that have coped better, and more professionally, with the current economic situation. If your employer had better understood business needs, who were the competent employees, and more importantly how they were feeling they'd have made a better job of it. Besides, with a '...


4

When I give 2-weeks notice to my manager, and when I'm talking to my coworkers who will be very upset that I'm leaving, is there anything I can do to cushion the blow? You can offer some of your colleagues to ask at your new place if they are looking for more people, though you will want to do that off current employers property, time and comms. Besides ...


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