279

You need to be able to divine the "Real Reason™" behind what your boss is saying. Option 1: He's truly unaware it's a "supported configuration." As the one who is in charge of IT for my company, my response would be, "Well, yeah. Put it any way you want. Call us if it stops working." They're designed to be used that way. If you want, I'll bring a ...


154

Hotdesking doesn't solve any problems, no matter whether the office is too small or not. I've worked at a company that had 20-40% fewer seats than employees. Battles for chairs cost us (and company...) plenty of time. It was a drama. The most important part of the day was ensuring you had a chair. Your company is probably expecting to grow. This could ...


141

Your friend is overthinking this way too much. This is a "highly skilled and ambitious software engineer?" - I think they can figure out the bathrooms for themselves. I think if there are "general announcements" about "Geek Girls" events, this person can decide for themselves if they want to attend. I've worked with a few people over the years who ...


117

Probably the best approach is to make being somewhere else feel more natural and appealing - difficult to be specific without seeing the office but I would try: Place a comfy-looking chair opposite your desk (angle the chair so as to be slightly diagonal to your desk to signal that it's "open"). If the people visiting you are needing to see your screen then ...


104

I am not a fan of the hot desk principle, but here are a few reason why people might be for it: Tidier working area. If people can't keep their belongings at their desk, the desks are typically clutter free Fresh perspective. Some people actually think differently when they are moved around. I don't, but I know people who claim where they sit affect them ...


96

Go to IT and ask if it is a "supported configuration" I'd also suggest finding other people that work with vertical monitors and going to IT to verify they support this, then going to your boss as a group.


85

Hot Desking is useful if team structure changes often, or if people are working from home for the majority of their time and their presence days can be coordinated company-wide. That's a lot of ifs. I've seen exactly one working example for each of these: one customer building test and measurement equipment organizes work items as short-lived projects, ...


65

I'm a bigender person, and I was browsing Stack Overflow when I saw this. It is 100% okay to ask a person their pronouns, and it would be disrespectful to not ask and end up using the wrong ones. The bigender community, while very small, is exceedingly diverse, and many say that no two bigender people can agree on the exact definition of of bigender. ...


42

There's a huge amount of research into how office layouts affect employee happiness and productivity, with some areas that have a consensus view, and others that don't. Some of the things that have a consensus view are that poor lighting, uncomfortable furniture and high noise levels have highly detrimental impacts on productivity (see 1 and 2 below and ...


42

I have worked in a number of different offices in the UK and I don't think there is a cast iron rule. In some offices there is a rota and people take it in turns in others everyone just makes their own cup or one for their close team members. I would avoid getting into a habit of making tea for a large group, you will find some people rely on you to do it (...


39

I will offer you two solutions (woot Balsamiq integration!): Skew your seating position relative to the desk, if your desks are large enough. Turn the desks outward, if you have space, which the mock-up you provided seems to show you do. We do this in my office and it works very well:


39

Is it Bad Form to use an Ecigarette or Vaporizor in the office? "Bad form" is very context-specific. In my office, using an Ecigarette or Vaporizor wouldn't be permitted at all, and thus would be extremely bad form. You can choose to fight for your "rights" by learning what the local laws currently permit, and learning if your company has a specific ...


35

The person who changed their mind may have never been exposed to ecigs and dismayed to find out that others are affected. In fact, the vapor may affect him or her far more than orginally expected. For instance any kind of a vapor tends to make my asthma much worse. I have never been around an ecig, so I have no idea if it would bother me and perhaps your co-...


33

Having had the great fortune of working with pathological managers for most of my past career, I would suggest the following: Request your IT people to send an email company wide explaining that it is safe and approved to use monitors vertically, like the usual sort of informational emails that are sent company wide by IT departments. If they are not ...


32

Given that I want a quiet private office within commuting distance of my house (in a medium-large city known for its tech companies), and am willing to compromise on almost everything else (including job title), how might I go about finding employers who offer this? Since it is so rare that companies offer private offices these days, any company that ...


31

You have to ask yourself, why are they going to the trouble to walk around the desk and stand behind you? This doesn't seem like normal behaviour. Especially if you've created a cramped and uncomfortable place, moving your desk close to the wall and put in obstacles to stop them coming close (bags, plants on the ground, furniture, coat stand, etc), and maybe ...


30

You're clearly not a good fit for the office. That's pretty much it. This isn't necessarily a bad thing, it's just not your cup of tea. We have the same sort of thing in our office, although on a smaller scale (and with a crossbow instead of a nerf gun). Personally I think it's very important to have a relaxing atmosphere where everyone can be themselves ...


27

If some employees are not regularly at that office (e.g. mostly-remote workers), a hot desking system allows the desk space to be used more efficiently. I believe this was the original reason for the system; it allows the company to save on office space that goes unused. Also, if a worker has multiple office locations, s/he might not need a dedicated space ...


26

It is reasonable to request a change, citing the issues you brought up. It is also reasonable for management to refuse as seating is a highly political thing and there are many things beyond your personal comfort that go into how they determine who sits where. The fact that your managers did not solicit input from the employees tells me they are less ...


21

You may consider, if you have the space, simply offsetting the desks.


21

I doubt there's a big database somewhere where you can find a list of such employers. Even if you could search based on some criteria a company filled out in a form, there's no guarantee that what they consider 'quiet' matches what you consider it to be. Apply for jobs and during the initial interviews make it clear up front you are only interested in ...


21

I know it might sound a bit silly letting the layout of a company's office being a major factor in one's decision on whether or not to take a job, but for me right now it is the only real discriminating factor. No, it's not silly. People have different priorities. For some people, it's the type of work that they are doing and the nature of the projects. For ...


21

There are too many unknowns to answer your question. But, from experience, I can give a couple of examples where hot desking makes sense: At my current place of employment, most departments don't use hot desking -- since most people work from the office. Except for our largest department: customer care. Customer care works 24/7/365, which many agents only ...


21

3 months without a desk and work space of your own? This is not a good sign. If it were me, I'd be looking for another job. After 3 months I see no legitimate reason they could have for not providing you the "tools" and space to do your job. In my opinion, their actions show a lack of "valuing" their employees, which doesn't bode well for your future ...


17

If skewing your seating positions per this answer works, that's easiest -- no moving of furniture. If that doesn't work out, it looks like you have room to rotate the bottom desk: I'm assuming that if C in your original diagram isn't bothered by kicking the legs at the corners of the other desks, then no one will be bothered in this arrangement either. In ...


17

Unfortunately (IMHO) open office has become the norm for most software development shops during the past decade or so. It is one thing to host one dev team, working on a single project, in the same room. This arrangement, one may argue, increases synergy within the team while isolating them from the noise and interruptions of the rest of the world. So for ...


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