New answers tagged

0

Perhaps you already realize this, but I think the trick here is: You want to ask soon enough to avoid wasting your time and the company's time pursuing an opportunity that you're going to reject, but on the other hand you don't want to give the impression that you are demanding, that you care more about office amenities than you do about producing for the ...


0

I think this depends on the job you are applying for, and with which employer. In my experience, much office work these days is done in cubicles or open-plan spaces with variable lighting conditions depending on where you are seated. Even mid-level management positions are no guarantee of your own office. When choosing which office building to rent (or ...


0

If you know in advance, with certainty, that these are absolute deal breakers for you, then you should bring it up at the earliest opportunity. Perhaps not in the application itself, but certainly in the initial phone interview. There's no point spending time and effort going through an interview process only to find out later on that the company can't ...


1

Contrary to other answers, I'll tell you there isn't much you can do to find a lots of info on companies. The interview is the best place to get all relevant information. You shouldn't look at it as it is only your test - you should look at it also as an opportunity to get as much details about the workplace as you can. When I was looking to change a ...


6

One of my questions at an interview is "can I please see where I'll be working?" It resolves a very large collection of issues; including ones that you may not ask explicitly; for example "is there an issue with the state of the building"; or "will I only be given a single small monitor to work with". There are some places that may have reasons to say no; ...


24

I'm not interested in working in: A cubicle An office without lots of windows and natural light. An office where I can't walk to restaurants/coffeeshops. (...) What would be an appropriate way/time during the interview pipeline to bring this up? Early. If possible, do your own research early too. A lot of job postings write about ...


2

Checking on Glass Door, etc might give some indication of the working environment; sometimes. Also, if applying through an external recruiter, they have probably visited the client's premises. If not, they probably already have someone who works/worked there, whom you/they could ask. Don't worry about putting off an external recruiter by this - if you ...


1

You have special requirements that are pretty unusual these days, so chances are that most opportunities that come up will not meet them. Best you can do, is to bring it up early in the interview process, i.e during the first phone screen with either the recruiter or the hiring manager. Walking into an interview, taking a look around and then walking right ...


48

During any interview stages you go through, you should have the opportunities to ask questions. This would be the perfect time for you to ask, even if it may not be relevant to the current interview e.g. You're in a technical interview, but you're asking about the office. This is basically your chance to ask about anything from office culture, to the best ...


3

In our office, we have the policy of every desk is free to use. But IF you know you come back tomorrow MORNING, then you can leave your stuff there (Mainly Keyboard, because everything else is put away). When you know you are absent the next day, put your keyboard somewhere else, like a locker or put it behind the screens or something. If the space before ...


1

My suggestion is to assign the job of maintaining the signs for desks to other people. The people who use the desk already have a lot on their minds - they can very easily forget to set the flag. Or they might have to rush out and not have the time. Or some might indeed "conveniently forget", too. At any rate, it's exctremely error prone, as you've already ...


0

I work in an office that has little to no spare desks at the best of times. It is rammed! Desks are not exotic commodities. If your company can't afford desks for everyone who needs one, I think we've already found the problem. However, there tends to be desks within the office that are free (due to holiday, business travel, working from home) but ...


2

We have tried making colleagues aware that they should take a 'hot-desk' laminate from reception when vacant and put it on their desk. This didn't work as wanted as people either didn't comply, or the signage wasn't obvious enough among the sea of desks. You're doing it the wrong way around. You're putting a flag on a "free" table. What you should do is ...


2

Why not make the desks available by default? Change the culture so that when you come in in the morning you can sit at any desk that is free. This way you maximally use the available space. People won't avoid empty desks because 'Bob usually sits there and he might still come in.' If Bob comes in later, he'll take the next free desk. This does require you ...


2

Perhaps put a label on everyone's usual desk with their email. When the desk seems vacant for a while, people can email to ask if the occupant is out of the office. They'll either get an out-of-office response, meaning yes, or if the person is just away for an afternoon and didn't set one, they can always quickly respond yes/no. For those where the ...


6

Sounds like hot-desking is a short term band-aid here. If your office is "rammed", then soon(er or later) you will need a larger office. Perhaps try concentrating on that? If not feasible, I would recommend allowing more working from home. But it sounds like management has their head in the sand over this one. [Update, after your comment] Personally, I ...


62

Standing flag they should take a 'hot-desk' laminate from reception when vacant and put it on their desk Instead of going elsewhere to get a sign, keep a sign at every desk. For visibility, make it a toy-sized flag in a stand or something else vertical. When someone sits, they take down the flag. When the person departs, they raise the flag. The ...


7

You can set up desks in an outlook calendar and book openings that way. Have ongoing "meetings" for your desks, and set the availability for when your desks will be unoccupied


4

I worked in several companies, and there were plenty of times when someone needed to sit for some time (from a few minutes, to a few days): candidates for jobs, people in business trips, ... There was never any process about it. Someone (insider) would spot a potentially available desk, and ask around if the regular "owner" is using it during that day or ...


37

When we're not in the office, we leave a sign that says "This desk is available for hot-desking". I don't think you need anything else than that. If you want to be more specific, mention when you'll be back.


-1

Are you sure, working IT guys are the real reason? Your boss being a control freak has already been named as real reason and I totally agree, but would like to add another possibility I've seen: I worked in an office which was well visible behind a glass front from the entrance hall, where customers were being entertained. We had really bad strict rules on ...


1

From past experience, there are certain software applications used by IT that may not work in that configuration. I used to work in a help desk where management had access to record the screens during a help desk call or view it in real time for coaching purposes. If I rotated the screens, the screen would not be recorded or visible to management, and this ...


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