Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
56

This is usually why new starters are taken out for lunch or shown the ropes by members of their team. If no one appears to have offered, there's nothing wrong with doing so yourself, or suggesting it to someone else. The informal lunch setting, sometime during the first week, is the perfect time to bring up the things you won't find written down anywhere. ...


24

The best way to address this is to pair the person with a mentor who has been with the company a while and has good relationships with many of the fellow employees. This doesn't have to be someone in a similar role. This person can give introductions to people in the department, company, and people they might be working with in different departments. ...


12

This is why companies compose an employees handbook. It serves as a reference for most work related things as well as giving civil defence information and things like that. If you have unwritten rules that need to be adhered to, write them down and give them out. If it's just minor common sense stuff like 'don't pee on the floor' which you don't trust ...


11

Yes, you should raise your concerns with your manager. No matter how senior a developer is, it's completely unrealistic to expect the same productivity from a new ployee as from one who worked with the tools for a year and knows the processes. And especially so if said new employee isn't given the slightest amount of on-boarding introduction. Don't argue ...


8

Honestly, you should probably bring that up with your manager. Either in a 1 on 1, or ideally, right now. Something along the lines of “I feel I now have a good grasp of the codebase, is there anything I should now start to work on while we wait for X to start?” This might include prototyping things to get familiar with the tech or things you might ...


3

My inner voice noted that it is already off the rails. Then this is/was definitely the time to voice that concern. You have legitimate concerns about delivery of the project from the outset, you don't need to feel bad about raising those with the key stakeholders - my advice is to go do so as soon as possible. That's partly your job as a senior, after all. ...


2

Do any companies have comprehensive internal documentation that is public? Usually, no, they do not have. That kind of information is considered part of the business secrets. Some companies publish that information, among other reasons, because: they are already big enough and cannot be shaken by the competition; they do everything for free anyway, and ...


2

Can anyone help me calm down and let me know what could potentially happen, and what steps could I take to clarify this? Chill, Zee. The calmer you are the better one can think and come with a solution :). You say that the resume you sent/applied with has the correct dates. I suggest you reach out to the company you are applying and point this out to them. ...


2

I would definitely pull (him|her) aside and try to get to the motivation behind the questions. Is (he|she) concerned that individual workload will be increased because of the need for mentorship or training? There could be some internal or external pressure and as a result, the developer is lashing out, either consciously or subconsciously. For example, if ...


2

It appears that you're dealing with what is known as a "Curse of Knowledge" problem. The senior staff person isn't able to relate to others who don't share his comprehensive knowledge of your workplace. He lacks the empathy to see things from the point of view of others who simply don't know what he knows. This happens a lot in places where expertise is ...


2

Most good companies have documented processes. This may not be the case with some smaller startup companies that may not yet have many processes in place. You mentioned that the company appeared to be very regimented which implies to me that it is highly process driven, and as such I would expect it to be well documented. No doubt some sort of induction ...


1

Your company's culture is defined by the worst grievances that are permitted. If you do not act, or act only privately, your employees (junior, senior, and management) are going to believe it's a place where seniors can treat juniors like dirt. While keeping quiet and hoping that things blow over might seem like a good idea, it is important to remember ...


1

I would start by talking about the issue with him, trying to align your concerns with his. Does he see something you don't see? Do you see something he doesn't see? Is he aware that the new people will not feel welcome because of his behaviour, making it more difficult to them to adapt and be a productive member of the team? Or are you not aware of how ...


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