We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
314

Your friend is being had, if I was him I'd just refuse, do my normal hours and go home. The company can then decide what they want to do about it. In any case I'd be looking for a new job, so if they contemplate disciplinary action over it, they better hurry. Usually in nominally grey areas (and this just barely qualifies) standing your ground and calling ...


282

Most importantly, make it clear that you have a plan for adjusting future workloads so that he hopefully doesn't ever have to do this again. There's a danger here that you seem to have picked up on. Some workplaces celebrate the "hard worker" willing to "do whatever it takes" so much that it becomes a cultural expectation that people will always "do ...


217

What your manager says is nonsense. What he apparently wants is "bums on seats". A nice quote from some top manager at Microsoft: "You can make people stay in the office 80 hours a week. You can't make them work more than 40 hours a week". Working more than 40 hours a week decreases productivity, and not productivity per hour, but productivity per week. ...


184

A wiser man than me said “You can make people stay in the office for 80 hours a week, but you can’t make them work more than 40 hours a week.” That’s the problem you are running into, and there’s nothing you can do. People come to the office because you pay them. They work because they want to. And you know why these people have no motivation to work.


176

If I were one of those employees, I'd turn it down, too. All that overtime is basically the result of poor planning. By signing up to do the overtime, it enables those bad planners to stay around and keep making the same mistake. If nobody shows up for overtime, eventually it puts the planners in the hot-seat. Consider putting the whip to their backs, ...


171

You're missing the obvious third option: Stop working on Saturdays It's clear you're not allowed to work on Saturdays so you should stop doing it. If your manager tries to force you anyway you kindly respond with: Of course I would work on Saturday if you need me to, as long as I can officially enter those hours in my time-sheet and receive the proper ...


162

You can make an impact programming and learning outside of your paid work. There are many open source projects out there that are looking for talented individuals to help out. Find something that resonates with you - something you believe in. Possibly something that you will learn from (a different language, framework or area of programming than in your ...


153

Different companies have different rules and different levels of tolerance on this. Companies who want you on the dot of your start, usually want you to be in, have had your chat with colleagues, made your coffee etc and BE READY to start work at your time (e.g. 9 am) which is why they are pushing you for 8:45. Although you signed in for 9, you probably ...


137

I am aware its up to the individual what they do and its really none of my business really what they do with their spare time, So you're fully aware that what you want to do is out of line and you have no business controlling other people's working hours? but my question is if there are any subtle ways i can perhaps convince them to not come in early or ...


134

I used to give guys 3 or 4 day weekends when they finished projects early or on time. In the days of scrum, there is a lessened sense of accomplishment in getting big projects done, since scrum seems more of a constant grind. I would think a free 3 or 4 day weekend would really show you appreciate his extra time. It also shows your team that you are ...


132

How can I discourage employees from working voluntary overtime? By telling them, in person, at 5 PM, to go home. This sounds simple (and it is), but it goes a long way. Early in my career, my boss told me to go home at 5 PM, and I never forgot it. He told me that there is plenty of work remaining for tomorrow, and that now is not the time to "burn the ...


113

There's a very simple way of conveying that you have an appointment: Hey boss, I often have appointments scheduled for 6 PM. It takes me about an hour to get to them, and so I'd really like to take advantage of our flex time policy to come in 10 minutes early, and leave at around 4:50, such that I make it on time. Could we talk about it? If you don't ...


111

If she thinks that she can't get all the work done in those hours, and she feels all the work is important, then she should go to her boss and work out priorities for the work: what work is most important, and what work may not get done with less hours. Hi boss. Since I won't be able to get all my tasks done without overtime, what tasks are less ...


110

Reading your question and while completely agreeing with keshlam's answer, I think the right question to ask is, as a manager, "how can you get your boss to prioritise new work rather than imposing an increase in workload without considering the impact on the team?" If you are: Late in a sprint (and potentially on time); and Asked to add something into the ...


106

This is an odd one, but the answer may be complicated. In the upper peninsula of Michigan there are places that enforce strict environmental rules to protect the community and closed habitat. These places have rules like "no cars" or "mass transit only". These locations have gotten creative with how they compensate employees for their travel time. This is ...


104

You need to check what's in your contract - but broadly speaking if this is overtime in the sense of being outside of your contracted hours then yes they can.


102

I think there are already answers covering many aspects, but if you're looking for a good response to this emotional manipulation, you could maybe say something like that: If I am not rested, I cannot work focused, more errors sneak in, and that is irresponsible! So I take responsibility, go home and try to sleep well!


100

The other answers are good but I wanted to add one more point. If he's promoting you to a leadership role then that means that people more junior in the company than yourself will be looking to you for leadership and following your example. If they arrive at 9 themselves then they do not know you have been there since 7, for all they know you got there 5 ...


90

If you are hourly, you tell him, "Excuse me, let me clock back in until we are done with this." If he pushes back on that, a good response is "We could get in trouble if we don't track my time correctly." Emphasize the "we" - together we are working to find a good and legal solution. If you are salaried (and in the US), it's a bit fuzzier, because you're ...


87

The easiest approach is simply to direct the project managers to your manager (who I'm guessing is the product manager). Prioritizing work is your manager's job. If you're working on something for project manager A and project manager B comes to you with an "urgent" request, tell them you'd be happy to do so. You just need an email from your boss saying ...


85

You're kind of stuck. If you answer "No" to that question, then the company will simply move on to someone who will say "Yes". You could try to explain that your quality of work exceeds everyone else's so you can do the same amount of work in less time - but the company will probably want you to work at that higher level quality for more hours. You only ...


85

Are they allowed to force me to do overtime at no extra pay? This really depends on your local laws, your employment contract, and your status as an employee, none of which can really be determined here. Your best bet, should you really want an answer for this, is to consult a lawyer. What is more concerning is that your employer appears to have no concern ...


84

Numerous studies have shown time and again that money is an extremely poor motivator. Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us is a well sourced book which dives into the topic. The author, Dan Pink, has a really nice animated version of a talk he's given summarizing the findings. While monetary incentives are a poor motivator, instead people are ...


78

Every once in a while you'll run into someone like that, for whom work is their life. I've always had passions and hobbies outside of work, and long ago came to understand that I'll never share that attitude. I don't feel guilty about it, but I also understand why that mentality is attractive to management. I learned that the hard way at my first job. Our ...


74

Am I required to do so? Maybe not by law, but definitely by company culture, since the boss asked you to. How can I approach my boss with this issue? No need to make this complicated. Go to your boss, tell him that have been thinking about his request to "participate more" and wanted to clarify something. The thing you wanted to clarify is what you ...


71

I disagree somewhat with the other responses as a first response to directly ask. I would suggest you can get a very good feel based on other questions what the answers are and bring this up in a way they don't realize you are asking it. Ask how they plan projects and create deadline estimates. If they have any system at all, you can naturally followup ...


71

Yes, which is one reason why so many of us are contractors/consultants. If you're with a good company, they will compensate you with either comp time, or an IDGAF attitude towards what you are doing during slow times. If they are a bad company and don't compensate you, update your resume and prepare to move on. A family member of mine was working so much ...


69

I don't "show a sense of urgency" like the rest of the team because I am laid-back and typically leave right at 5. If "laid-back" was a term actually used by your boss in this context, he is basically telling you that leaving "right at 5" isn't sending off the kind of signals he wants from his leaders. Is he right that coming in early is not the same ...


68

Assuming you are in the US... If non-exempt employees work overtime, and you know they work overtime and do not pay them time-and-a-half for it, you are breaking the law. Employees cannot volunteer. You need to instruct your employees that when they do this, it is not they who break the law but you. As kindly as their work is intentioned, it is putting your ...


67

Fact: You gave your employer a lot of your time for free, and they will not respect you one bit for it. They like the status quo, that you work your ass off without additional pay. They like that very much. It will be close to impossible to convince your current employer that this should be otherwise. You will even have trouble to convince your employer ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible