193

Should I just make up an excuse not to go even though I'll risk my boss being upset with me? No. You are making far too big a deal of this. Just go, be part of the photo shoot, then give your notice once the details of your new job are formally worked out.


105

You've kind of broken one of the first rules of freelancing. There is an old consultant's rhyme that goes: Roses are red, Violets are blue, Pay me. You've given this person free work long enough that now they expect it. It's time to put a stop to that. I would recommend finishing what is on your plate and telling them that you can't continue until your ...


94

In Germany since January 2019 you can request a temporary reduction of your work time (Brückenteilzeit). This has to be at least a year though. They have to grant your request unless they can bring up a valid reason that speaks against it. You have to hand it in 3 months in advance though and you need to have been with your company for at least 6 months. ...


93

It's a part time casual job. People quit them all the time without repercussions. In theory all sorts of things can happen, but in practice no one cares. I've left a couple of jobs with no notice waving a finger at all and sundry. One I just stopped showing up. These sorts of jobs don't have the same sort of connotations as leaving full time professional ...


74

When a project has gone over the allotted hours, am I morally obligated to spend my own time fixing bugs or finishing the project? No. You are entitled to be paid for all of your hours worked. Even if the project runs over the allotted time, even if your work is the reason why it went over, even if you feel bad - you should still be paid for your work. ...


69

As long as you think that you need good reasons to turn down underpaid freelance work you don't enjoy doing, you will be stuck doing this forever. Your reasons need only be good enough for you. Next time he asks you to make a change or to do something, tell him "My apologies, but that will not be possible." If he starts to argue or tell you why it ...


65

I apparently hate working 40-hour weeks, and I don't need as much money as I'm making. I'm not sure yet if I would rather stay in my current position or find another, but I've already been warned of a huge drawback to switching to part-time: I would lose all of my benefits. I wouldn't have the option to use my employer's health or life insurance,...


63

A possible schedule is working 9 hours M-Th, and then 4 on Friday, which keeps you at full time. However, you need to find reasons that benefits your company, not you. If you can come up with good reasons that will be beneficial to the company, then present that to your boss. If the ONLY reason is that it will make you happier (because you'll be able to ...


58

You would run several risks, a lot depends on your relationship with the company/manager. The three major ones I see are as follows: You might get stuck on the 80% if you deliver all the work they need from you when the 6 months is up, remember it wasn't their idea. You may be replaced if they feel you're more committed to personal projects, especially ...


53

Well you're not morally obligated to do anything, depending on your morals :) If you look at the two ends of the spectrum, you have: Fix them for free and then be expected to do so ad infinitum; or Point blank refuse to fix them and (potentially) cause bad blood or even get fired. Of course, this is if you only take the black and white approach. I would ...


51

My question here is: Would using this automation script be advisable? It makes a lot of sense to me, but the real decision maker is your boss. Once on the job, learn what they really want done, and how they do it. You may very well learn that what you imagine automating isn't realistic, or isn't the crux of the problem. You might learn that the real skill (...


39

so it's not a done deal yet You answered your own question, it is not a done deal yet, therefore you continue to work this job as though the other will fall through. Which of course means you need to participate in the staff photo.


36

It sounds like here that the company has made a fixed price bid to the customer based on your estimates and now things have run over they are refusing to pay more. This is a common scenario and if the company isn't big enough to swallow the disparity then usually you'll be expected to provide the time to finish it. Whether you should is down to you, but ...


33

The question you have to ask yourself is "Do I want to do a job that can be trivially automated by a Photoshop script?" I hope that the answer is no. You are too good for the job as originally described. You automate the process, show them what you did, and if they don't have something that requires someone with your level of abilities to do, they might let ...


29

This is what you should email: You need to pay me all the money you owe me. I need to be paid in full. Until you can make this happen, I'm indefinitely suspending this contract. This has gone long enough. When he starts calling you, you repeat yourself like a broken record, and you say something like: I need to be paid in full now. Do you have my payment ...


28

The phrase "what comes around goes around" springs to mind. Treat employers the way you'd like to be treated and you will rarely tarnish your personal brand. The world is small and alienating anyone in the workforce is not worth it. If you run into any of these folks in the future, you'll be the guy who walked off the job. Take care of your reputation as ...


25

I'm surprised no one has mentioned it, but the question you should ask is: Why do any employers offer health insurance, retirement packages, etc.? Why not just offer bigger salaries? (What does health insurance really have to do with paying someone to answer the phone, or to fix clogged pipes, or to program computers?) Googling "history of employer ...


23

It depends on what type of contract you're working under. If your contract is for a specific task, quoted/estimated by you to be done within a certain amount of time or at a specific price (often called a fixed-price job), then you are taking on the risk of the job requiring more time. In such a contract, you should be making it clear that any changes to the ...


22

I am more than ready to work the extra four hours mid week. Not meaning to be picky, but those are not extra four hours. They would be extra if you took them along with your full day at the IT job, but you are proposing to cut the full-time job in half that day (so you will have normal work hours). Being realistic, it's unlikely your IT employer will agree ...


21

What I have observed of people moving to part time (even mostly full-time as you suggest) is that they are taken less seriously and are seen as less committed. This may translate into getting less interesting projects because they see you as having no promotion potential. The fewer hours worked, the less seriously you are taken. So working 80% of the time ...


20

Yes you can probably quit without notice without repercussions, but why not give notice anyway? They will not ask you to serve your notice unless they are desperate to fill a shift - they would rather give them to those who are staying.


18

Whether you finish a degree in 1 semester or 20 has little bearing on its competitive value. Your terminology is a bit flawed, there is no such thing as a "part time degree". Once you have a degree, you have it. The fact that you went to school part-time has no relevance. If a school doesn't hold the same requirements for a "full time degree" and a "part ...


17

Just to add a different (non-US) perspective: In Germany, working part-time is quite normal (though not every company supports it to the same degree). In particular, I know several software developers who work part time (between 20 and 30 hours, when the regular work week is 40h). Benefits are usually not a problem: health insurance and retirement ...


17

It's legal, they can do this, and you should have raised the issue then and there. Much more importantly, in case you ever get a similar situation owing to a bank error or a tax refund error, you should not have spent the money because it wasn't yours to begin with. Try to seek an arrangement with them.


17

In general, when speaking to HR, should it be paid for or done during a paid word day? Since this is a work-related issue, it should be performed "on the clock" and you should be paid. Find an on the clock time that works for both of you. Propose that you speak with them during that time period. Make sure that you are providing enough time to meet their ...


16

I have received many awards in my life, including from the CEO of a large (for Canada) organization I have worked for as an intern. I am also Canadian. How I have replied was heavily driven by the culture of the organization and the nature of the award. Absolutely respond. This is absolutely something you should respond to as it was directed at you. ...


15

Legal Obligations Check your contract in regards to anything involving notice period, non-competition, or other clauses that impact you leaving the company. As long as you follow those, you are legally protected. Ethical Obligations You are a part-time employee who has only been there for a few months. Chances are that you are not a mission-critical ...


15

To me, this sounds like such a trivial thing, really. It sounds to me like you are using Photoshop the way it was designed. You are doing the job you were asked to do. You are hardly "automating" anything. Using a script to do this is part of how it is done. I almost feel like you are saying you've been hired to do someone's roof because nobody else at the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible