194

Should I just make up an excuse not to go even though I'll risk my boss being upset with me? No. You are making far too big a deal of this. Just go, be part of the photo shoot, then give your notice once the details of your new job are formally worked out.


136

If you don't sign a contract, you don't have a new job. Go to the photoshoot. There are ways to deal with it later if required. This is the same as the other 2 answers but couldn't resist adding the photo :)


93

It's a part time casual job. People quit them all the time without repercussions. In theory all sorts of things can happen, but in practice no one cares. I've left a couple of jobs with no notice waving a finger at all and sundry. One I just stopped showing up. These sorts of jobs don't have the same sort of connotations as leaving full time professional ...


69

When a project has gone over the allotted hours, am I morally obligated to spend my own time fixing bugs or finishing the project? No. You are entitled to be paid for all of your hours worked. Even if the project runs over the allotted time, even if your work is the reason why it went over, even if you feel bad - you should still be paid for your work. ...


64

I apparently hate working 40-hour weeks, and I don't need as much money as I'm making. I'm not sure yet if I would rather stay in my current position or find another, but I've already been warned of a huge drawback to switching to part-time: I would lose all of my benefits. I wouldn't have the option to use my employer's health or life insurance,...


64

A possible schedule is working 9 hours M-Th, and then 4 on Friday, which keeps you at full time. However, you need to find reasons that benefits your company, not you. If you can come up with good reasons that will be beneficial to the company, then present that to your boss. If the ONLY reason is that it will make you happier (because you'll be able to ...


53

Well you're not morally obligated to do anything, depending on your morals :) If you look at the two ends of the spectrum, you have: Fix them for free and then be expected to do so ad infinitum; or Point blank refuse to fix them and (potentially) cause bad blood or even get fired. Of course, this is if you only take the black and white approach. I would ...


52

My question here is: Would using this automation script be advisable? It makes a lot of sense to me, but the real decision maker is your boss. Once on the job, learn what they really want done, and how they do it. You may very well learn that what you imagine automating isn't realistic, or isn't the crux of the problem. You might learn that the real skill (...


39

so it's not a done deal yet You answered your own question, it is not a done deal yet, therefore you continue to work this job as though the other will fall through. Which of course means you need to participate in the staff photo.


35

It sounds like here that the company has made a fixed price bid to the customer based on your estimates and now things have run over they are refusing to pay more. This is a common scenario and if the company isn't big enough to swallow the disparity then usually you'll be expected to provide the time to finish it. Whether you should is down to you, but ...


33

The question you have to ask yourself is "Do I want to do a job that can be trivially automated by a Photoshop script?" I hope that the answer is no. You are too good for the job as originally described. You automate the process, show them what you did, and if they don't have something that requires someone with your level of abilities to do, they might let ...


28

The phrase "what comes around goes around" springs to mind. Treat employers the way you'd like to be treated and you will rarely tarnish your personal brand. The world is small and alienating anyone in the workforce is not worth it. If you run into any of these folks in the future, you'll be the guy who walked off the job. Take care of your reputation as ...


25

I'm surprised no one has mentioned it, but the question you should ask is: Why do any employers offer health insurance, retirement packages, etc.? Why not just offer bigger salaries? (What does health insurance really have to do with paying someone to answer the phone, or to fix clogged pipes, or to program computers?) Googling "history of employer ...


23

I am more than ready to work the extra four hours mid week. Not meaning to be picky, but those are not extra four hours. They would be extra if you took them along with your full day at the IT job, but you are proposing to cut the full-time job in half that day (so you will have normal work hours). Being realistic, it's unlikely your IT employer will agree ...


22

They exist but due to the somewhat temporal and volatile nature of part time contract work they are not likely to be advertised on job boards. As with most of my professional experience throughout my life so far, the only quality jobs I have ever had were obtained by knowing and keeping in touch with past colleagues and friends. Public job postings and ...


22

It depends on what type of contract you're working under. If your contract is for a specific task, quoted/estimated by you to be done within a certain amount of time or at a specific price (often called a fixed-price job), then you are taking on the risk of the job requiring more time. In such a contract, you should be making it clear that any changes to the ...


21

What I have observed of people moving to part time (even mostly full-time as you suggest) is that they are taken less seriously and are seen as less committed. This may translate into getting less interesting projects because they see you as having no promotion potential. The fewer hours worked, the less seriously you are taken. So working 80% of the time ...


20

Yes you can probably quit without notice without repercussions, but why not give notice anyway? They will not ask you to serve your notice unless they are desperate to fill a shift - they would rather give them to those who are staying.


18

Whether you finish a degree in 1 semester or 20 has little bearing on its competitive value. Your terminology is a bit flawed, there is no such thing as a "part time degree". Once you have a degree, you have it. The fact that you went to school part-time has no relevance. If a school doesn't hold the same requirements for a "full time degree" and a "part ...


17

Just to add a different (non-US) perspective: In Germany, working part-time is quite normal (though not every company supports it to the same degree). In particular, I know several software developers who work part time (between 20 and 30 hours, when the regular work week is 40h). Benefits are usually not a problem: health insurance and retirement ...


17

It's legal, they can do this, and you should have raised the issue then and there. Much more importantly, in case you ever get a similar situation owing to a bank error or a tax refund error, you should not have spent the money because it wasn't yours to begin with. Try to seek an arrangement with them.


15

Legal Obligations Check your contract in regards to anything involving notice period, non-competition, or other clauses that impact you leaving the company. As long as you follow those, you are legally protected. Ethical Obligations You are a part-time employee who has only been there for a few months. Chances are that you are not a mission-critical ...


15

To me, this sounds like such a trivial thing, really. It sounds to me like you are using Photoshop the way it was designed. You are doing the job you were asked to do. You are hardly "automating" anything. Using a script to do this is part of how it is done. I almost feel like you are saying you've been hired to do someone's roof because nobody else at the ...


14

First off, you are not jeopardizing the company. It is the company's responsibility to make sure the company can continue in case an important worker is lost. If they cannot operate without you, that is unfortunate, but not your responsibility. If you feel it is best to leave the company, then that is your choice and your right. They cannot force you to ...


14

Go to the dentist and have your wisdom tooth fixed Inform you boss in writing (e-mail) that you are unfit to work and need to take care of this. Do this as soon as possible Have the doc write a note that you were in no shape to go to work and how long you will need to recover before you can do your job again. Send copy of this note to your boss (photo by e-...


13

You mention a few factors that make me feel like you are viewing this as more of what I would call an internship than an regular job. The big difference being that an intern accepts being underpaid because they are learning, building a good job history and entered the job with fewer skills - so they are potentially less productive. In these cases, an ...


12

I work typically 3.5 hours per day, at a high enough billing rate to cover my expenses. I've been doing this since 2009 reasonably successfully. However, I am a contractor - I'm not working for a single employer on their payroll. Your employer, in this circumstance, will be a very small organization and you will most likely be their only programmer. In ...


12

technically I'd be working one day for free Don't make assumptions like this. Ask them. I'm unsure how these things normally work The norm is you get paid for the time you work.


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