Hot answers tagged

280

Talk to your boss. This isn't a 'petty' issue - not being paid on time is breach of contract. I see two scenarios here; either the HR person isn't organized at all (and why is HR handling Payroll? That should be Accounts) - or, the company has cashflow issues and he's under orders to delay payments as long as possible. In either case, a chat with your boss ...


166

Don’t spend the money. You should put it aside for when you are asked for the money back. Inform the company that they are still paying you. A registered letter to their company address will be fine. Don’t offer anything. It’s their mess, they can clean it up. If they paid for health insurance, pension etc. That’s their problem to get the money back. ...


149

Just start with whatever you use for general informal communications with your boss (instant messaging, text messaging, whatever) and just say: Hi Boss. My August salary doesn't seem to have made it into my bank account yet - could you check on this? Thanks! I'd be pretty sure you'd then get a response which is either "Aaargh. Sorry. Slipped my mind. I'...


57

I've been working for a small company (about 10 FTE, and a bunch of contractors). When I started about 7 years ago, our payroll was also a mess. It was being done by an accountant who had little understanding of payroll tax law. The company wasn't withholding state income taxes (the employees based in the US were on their own to pay quarterly estimated taxes)...


53

This is a scam. I'd do a little research on that bank/credit union, too. Directing you to a specific bank seems fishy. To do ACH payments, your employer needs the bank's ROUTING number, and your account number. No one EVER needs your PIN. PIN sands for PERSONAL identification number. Keep it personal.


50

I suggest you go to him on Friday morning, when your work starts, so the time you spend waiting comes out of your working time. And you wait until you have your check. Probably good to call your direct manager if it takes more than five minutes, so he is informed about what is going on. It is illegal not to pay you in time. So if he starts printing a ...


50

Don't spend the money. In many jurisdictions, employers have the legal right to ask for any overpaid money to be given back. Keep the money they have paid you to one side. Do keep trying to contact them. Skip HR and escalate it up the chain if you have to If you have the contact details for your old manager (assuming they still work there), that would be ...


40

Your work contract should not only include how much your salary is, but also when it's due. Keeping in mind that money transfers can take up to 3 days, it's appropriate to check in with your boss 3 - 5 days after the salary was due. You don't need to give any reasons for asking where the money is, it's part of your contract and should be transferred ...


40

Expect it to be clawed back at any time. Stop using the account. Whichever account this money is arriving into, stop using it and open another checking account. At the same bank is fine. If you use checks, get new checks. Leave in the account exactly the amount you were overpaid, plus $100. Let the money sit there, and continue to pile up as they ...


26

Talk to your boss and give it a little time. If necessary, talk to his boss and give it a little time. If that doesn't work, update your resume. If you're in the US, you can report it to your local Employment Security Association (or whatever it is called in your state/county) and they will do something about it. In my state if you can prove that is ...


26

While this may be a pain to do, create a second bank account, transfer all of your funds, minus the errant pay, and keep the first account to hold only the errant transfers so that your funds are not blended. Contact your local tax office for advice, and continue to pester HR, and CC senior management in the company so that they are made aware. Truth be ...


26

The simplest way to avoid "having to pay the money back" is never to receive it. I assume the payments are electronic transfers, since if they were posting you physical cheques all you have to do is not cash them. Rather than opening a new account with your bank and getting the payments transferred, just request your bank to block them. Eventually the ...


25

Well, what you describe is a very strong red flag. An incompetent, unorganised person will have problems like you describe now and then, maybe 50% times or even more but not always. What you describe is a strong suggestion that the payment delay is deliberate. For all developed countries I know this is a breach of labour laws that if exposed/discovered can ...


19

Personally, I would not agree to do so. I do not work in the modeling industry, but this request is definitely not normal in any industry I'm familiar with. I would propose that I verify the payment for them instead of giving them access to a bank account in my name. Edit: To be completely clear, I would have no problems with giving them the account number.


17

tl;dr: You should repay the money as soon as possible. You could still try to spin things as a misunderstanding, but that will become a harder sell with each passing day. The harms could go beyond 150 pounds-- perhaps you develop a reputation for dishonesty, making it harder to get future jobs. Or you end up with a criminal record, plus court costs. If ...


16

The reason this is such a headache is because it's not that they haven't paid you but that they have stopped you an incorrect amount of tax. They can't just transfer you the £300 and call it quits because from the point of view of HMRC (I'm assuming you are in the UK with your use of £) that would be an additional payment to you..which would in of itself be ...


15

Never give your pin to anyone. Ring the bank and check, they will tell you the same, in fact you can lose any protection the bank offers if they discover you gave the pin out. For some who don't seem to get it: Ring any bank you like and ask them if you should, or should not, divulge your PIN... Any bank will tell you no, try Bank of America, JPMorgan ...


12

How do I approach my boss again regarding this? Wait until pay day. Check to see if the money has been transferred to your account. If not, talk to your boss. "Boss. I think you forgot to transfer my pay again." Mention it each day that your pay doesn't appear in your account. Repeat until he gets the hint and does it automatically, or he doesn't get the ...


12

I agree with other answers to not spend it. As for screwing up your taxes and plans, you should put in your formal claim letter that accounting charges (hiring a professional accountant, transfert fees, ...) will be deduced from the money they sent you before returning it, as it was not your fault.


10

Ask for a detailed pay slip when in doubt, you should receive one monthly even if in electronic form. This is a mandatory procedure in many countries. Get acquainted with local labor laws and with your work environment. This is the kind of stuff that you should be familiar with to look out for your rights. If in doubt, or needing a quick consultation, ...


10

Step 1: Next time you go to visit the payroll guy, do it during work hours. Pick a time on Friday, and just sit in his office until you have the cheque in hand. If you work on a laptop, bring your laptop with you, and just camp out in his office, so your boss can't accuse you of shirking your duties. Step 2: Record whatever he says. Your locale may vary, ...


10

Outsource it. Insperity and companies like them are full of experts to help companies exactly like what you describe. One seriously bungled HR "event" can destroy a small company. A company such as this can make sure you start out "right" and keep you there. Remember: HR is a supporting function - it is not a revenue generator. Keep it simple, keep it ...


9

Sure, just be clear about your intentions. If they don't want to give out that information then it would be their responsibility to let you know. Otherwise, It's a very reasonable request. Hi HR, I have a friend who I think would be a good fit for job opening #12345. What is the starting pay for that position?


9

I am someone who has experienced a very similar issue. I got overpaid £20,000 at my workplace, and I chased the payroll department for 2 years before I got them to even respond to my calls / letters / emails. The only email that worked was the one that said "My employment is coming to an end and I am about to leave the country". I then received an ...


9

As everyone else is already saying, this is almost guaranteed to be a scam, but I wanted to highlight that modelling agency scams can go way beyond stealing your money. Fake modelling agencies can be fronts for human trafficking, and you should be very careful. While suspicious on its own, they are in general correct that you can simply change the PIN ...


8

I can sit here and try to think about if it's a scam or not. A lot of other answers have suggested it's a scam. But they miss the mark, because at the end of the day, it doesn't actually matter if it's a scam or not. There are certain things you should never do, regardless of the situation. Giving someone your PIN is one of them. It doesn't matter if it's "...


7

Without knowing the exact jurisdiction it's hard to comment on the legality of the situation. However in the general case if the two franchises are seperate legal entities (regardless of whether they have the same owner) then what the owner has done is the correct way to do things. Tennessee isn't somewhere I'm super-informed on but IIRC it may well be ...


7

Don't spend it until you consult a lawyer with expertise in local law. It might be preferable to spend it ASAP. "Don't spend it" is probably a nice hunch in good spirit, but this is a legal question with high dependence on jurisdiction. I wouldn't listen to internet people regarding this one. There are jurisdictions where an erroneously awarded gain is a ...


7

You should ask your cousin for a simple proof of employment, which is a letter with the dates that you worked there, and your role. This is standard practice elsewhere in the world, not sure if pay-stubs are an American thing. Seems rather strange.


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