388

How do I carry on managing an employee that is willing to go right over my head on an issue like this? This is not a problem with the employee. This is a problem between you and your superior. As a middle-level manager, I would be aghast if my boss allowed someone to go around me and get their acceptance on such a request without even first letting me ...


345

There's a 4th option: Call your retired infrastructure support manager and ask him for advice. He knows the right people, and may care enough about his former teams to call his contacts higher up in the company. The advantage of this option is that there's pretty much nothing to lose. If he doesn't want to get involved he may still have valuable advice, and ...


294

Get "sent home" notes in writing, preferably in emails This supports both (1) and (2), and might even get this new chap to back down a bit, because when he is forced to explicitly state "Joe Smith yawned twice at 4am" in writing, something which can then be taken to anyone with a modicum of common sense, he might realize that having his judgement reflected ...


232

the remaining ones will work hard in fear that if I don't work harder I may be the next Much more likely that the remaining ones will think "better jump, before I get pushed". And, the best of them will find it easiest to find new jobs with other companies. That's the way that it normally plays out when redundancies start. Add the knowledge that the ...


168

I wouldn't try to dictate his style of coding, let him do it the way he wants. If performance is an actual documented business requirement and he fails to fulfil it call him out on that. If he carries on failing to meet business requirements then he is failing to do his job, start giving him official verbal warnings, then written warnings and then let him ...


168

I am wondering if and how I can approach this employee, in an effort to convince her to stay Of course you can approach her. Something like "I heard through the grapevine that you might be setting up job interviews. Can we talk about that?" might work. Then ask if she is unhappy at your company, and if so, why. She may be willing to talk about it, or ...


166

Question: How to properly justify a team increase given that we don't have an output issue? (we are delivering in an acceptable manner already) Stop working overtime and see if your team can still deliver in an acceptable manner. By working overtime, you are simply adding hours of work to each member of the team, which is not much different than those ...


122

My general pattern for dealing with office conflicts is to try to work it out with the person (which you did, and it was fruitless) and if not to appeal to higher authority and or HR. In your case, I would be choosing something closest to option 1. Of course, just because you're going to another person doesn't mean you can't be diplomatic. If there is ...


110

You're reading a lot into his behaviour. Sure, those could be signs he's about to quit, but they are more general signs of unhappiness. It could mean trouble in his personal life, dissatisfaction with his job that's not bad enough to quit over, poor mental or physical health, or something else. Unless his performance is falling below acceptable, then as a ...


106

I'd say you only really have two options, if your boss isn't interested in your feedback and tells you "that's just the way things are": Do exactly what your boss asks you to do, even if it seems pointless and it is likely that it'll get torn up in a couple of weeks' time. If your boss is dictating, then they are 100% responsible for any failure. If, as you ...


93

It looks like you have a prima donna or even worse, Michel Angelo, working for you. How long has he been in the business of programming? I am asking that question because there is a huge difference between being in the business of programming and programming. Those who us have been in the trenches for any length of time can tell him that perfection can be ...


91

You have at least three issues here: you and the other dev waiting for him to join the morning meeting is wasting time and perhaps upsetting the two of you he would like flex time, to come in when he likes as long as he hits 40 hours and gets his stuff done, but the morning meeting is interfering with that now you think overall his quality of work dropped ...


77

Two issues. Your taxes and quitting. ...it's been more than 5 months of overtime money that has not been paid and there are no benefits whatsoever, sometimes the salary can be late. [...] And I did not sign any contract when I was told that I was a permanent employee, only verbal statements and congratulations. If you are in the United ...


75

As a Senior Developer, both of you are correct. It's finding the balance that you must work towards. Firstly, from your side, your requirements should be detailed clearly. I would recommend using the behavior-driven development (BDD) approach. This allows you to detail your requirements and ensure the software meets them. It is current best practise to ...


69

First and foremost, talk to your superior. You've got to start out by realising that this is not a problem with your employee, if anything, it's a problem with your boss. Unless it is typically his / her responsibility to set your employees hours, (s)he's out of his / her department by approving the request. It is quite probable that (s)he didn't know that ...


66

Uh so there are some other answers here that deal with, you know, your actual question. I'm more interested in the whole "not sending the employee on the trip" aspect. Just go to the end if you want my answer to your actual question though. Penalising an employee out of the blue is a terrible management decision. and From what i'm reading here, ...


63

That question made me think of what Joel "Joel on Software" Spolsky (who also served in the Israeli army) wrote about "The Command and Control Management Method": "Soldiers should fear their officers more than all the dangers to which they are exposed…. Good will can never induce the common soldier to stand up to such dangers; he will only do so through ...


55

A subjective measure like bags under eyes or yawn for 'fully fit to work at all times' is not valid in my opinion. The new manager should be measuring actual output. I could be bright eyed and doing no work (like I am now). If he is sending people home weekly with reasons like that and upper management has not already taken action is a bigger problem. ...


50

In this case, feel absolutely free Loyalty demands a certain amount of reciprocity, i.e. the employer must treat you reasonably. Being overworked, having lousy project management (getting that far behind is the evidence of that), not getting paid for overtime, sometimes not getting paid until late, and being unable to sleep all each individually qualify as ...


49

But maybe that "positive" effect do exist ? While it's not a universal "no" to that.. it's pretty close and the overall effect is likely to be negative. Let's assume the local jobs market for these people's skills is in reasonable health (i.e. the layoffs aren't as a result of a general tanking in the sector) and imagine you have three devs are intended to ...


43

This topic is a big favorite of mine, or more specifically: the topic of establishing "rules of conduct" for a team. A lot of times I see rules being established and enforced, without much thought being spent on the actual value of that rule. So what's the value of being on time, in other words having mandatory time where people are working? Most times, ...


41

First of all, you are both wrong. He is wrong to insist that code looks good, and you are wrong to insist on using an anti-pattern. The appropriate way to develop software lies somewhere in the middle of your two ideologies. It is possible to follow best practices and still have code that can be developed quickly, has good performance, and is maintainable,...


40

I have never encountered a competent person in any field who values rigid adherence to rules and forms over outcomes and function. If wrapping one's self in the flag is the first refuge of the scoundrel, then wrapping one's self in a set of rigid rules is the first refuge of the incompetent. I would be concerned that you're stuck with a "Cargo Cult" or "...


40

Okay several points: Don't argue, DOCUMENT Follow orders, but DOCUMENT Raise concerns, but FOLLOW ORDERS The boss isn't the boss because he's right, HE'S RIGHT BECAUSE HE'S THE BOSS That said: The way to approach everything is: Present your boss with the following information: What is wrong Why it is wrong Alternatives What the alternatives are better ...


39

A nearby team (of 4 members), whose output is poor, got an additional member. This is a potential red flag for me. Of course, some of the times, the output deficiency is due to not having enough staff, in which case it makes sense to add headcount and continue monitoring output. But if there's a more general pattern of rewarding poor-performing teams with ...


39

may I resign in the middle of this project? The answer to this question is always "Yes" There is never a good time to resign, it will always be an inconvenience of one kind or another. However, that inconvenience is not your problem; your problem is that your employment arrangement is no longer convenient for you. The project status is your employer's ...


36

You can't, and honestly, probably shouldn't. It's inevitable that he'll figure out his worth (or at least figure out that he's worth a lot more than you guys are paying him) and move on to somewhere that appreciates his abilities and will pay him commensurate to his abilities. The fact that it should be a no-brainer for your company to see his value doesn't ...


35

Read the employee handbook. Everywhere I've ever worked, escalation to your boss's boss is exactly how disagreements with your boss are supposed to go. Chances are that your employee has done the right thing, if they believe a reasonable request has been unreasonably refused. If you're going to complain about your employee not following the letter of ...


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