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1

My advice....when/if this happens again, look at the person directly for a few seconds and don't respond immediately. I'd then say something like "...we can table that discussion for after this meeting Bob. For now, let's move to ......" For the conversation with him after the meeting, I'd be direct with him - tell him that you are all on the same ...


2

I might be wrong as it's difficult to judge the situation over the internet. I see a pattern that freshly promoted team leads try to overcompensate the lack of experience and maybe confidence by brushing off critical feedback. In this case you can't even excuse that you need time to learn the ropes, because your were there before. Still you inherited some ...


11

I'm a fan of saying, "Let's table this discussion for ["another meeting" or "tomorrow's standup" or "our weekly 1-on-1"]." This does two main things: Makes it clear that this is not the appropriate time for the discussion, which should satisfy your desire to discourage insubordination. If they refuse, it is now their ...


1

I've watched this behavior before. It's pretty unsettling. You are sensing that they are trying to undermine you. You're probably right. Keeping your cool in a situation like this is key to resolving it. You find yourself getting upset (understandable) and don't want to look like an idiot. You also don't want to react badly to something that's not there. You'...


0

It's definitely a delicate situation. It sounds like the person in question might be harbouring some resentment over the fact that you got the promotion over them - which I'm sure you can understand, especially since they'd been at the company longer than you. That's not an excuse for poor behaviour, but it's important to consider the other person's feelings....


2

I agree with your proposed plan of action. As to what to do if your former manager doesn't play ball, then take it up with his new manager and have them solve it. If they don't, then escalate as appropriate. It's not your problem to solve, so don't make it one.


7

There is really no need for action at this stage. Them not playing ball is not your problem, and you can only complicate things by getting involved. They business will know there such a demotion is likely to cause problems. Pretend they didn't say anything. Go about your business. It's likely they will screw up in some way without your involvement. Their new ...


1

As a software professional who's been in this business for ... (koff, koff, wheeze) ... "quite a while now," the basic situation that you are now describing is: "legacy systems." For example – "my present employer has been manufacturing sofas for more than 85 years." When IBM first introduced the "System/36," they ...


1

You have two issues which could be in conflict with each other Managing the "technical stack" Managing a technical person Managing the "technical stack" is deciding what languages, tools, frameworks, and testing systems the company will use - especially for critical production work. No one developer should be allowed to change that ...


2

Without knowing much more about your boss, it seems there is a disconnect between you and your boss. You seem to be a technical person, who typically talks in terms of data throughput, storage, and bandwith. Your manager, meanwhile, talks in terms of cost and product. This is what a manager is paid to be concerned about. What you need to do is translate what ...


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